Programs and Courses

New Courses

ANT405H5 • Behind Bars: Anthropology of Institutions and Confinement

ANT405H5 • Behind Bars: Anthropology of Institutions and Confinement

This course explores confinement, institutions, and incarceration from a broad anthropological perspective. Bioarchaeological, archaeological, and ethnographic research on institutions (e.g., asylums, poorhouses, prisons) will be critically examined. The goal of the course is to provide students with a complex understanding of institutionalization through time and how health vulnerabilities are created and recreated.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT497H5 • Advanced Independent Study

ANT497H5 • Advanced Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading, research and planning for a publishable report on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the research and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT497Y5 • Advanced Independent Study

ANT497Y5 • Advanced Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading, research and planning for a publishable report on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the research and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO259H5 • Introduction to Biological Data

BIO259H5 • Introduction to Biological Data

This course introduces students to the exploration and analysis of biological data through computation. Students will learn to import biological datasets, parse and manipulate the data, and develop an intuition for basic statistical thinking through practical exercises and lectures.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Exclusions: BIOB20H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO427H5 • Data Science in Biology

BIO427H5 • Data Science in Biology

Biology has become a data-driven science with the arrival of complex datasets. Extracting information from these large-scale experiments requires approaches that unify statistics and computer science. The course will focus on strengthening mathematical intuition on core topics such as hypothesis testing and statistical models while connecting these to machine learning.

Prerequisites: BIO360H5
Exclusions: BIO429H5 or CSC311H1 or CSC311H5 or CSC413H1 or CSC413H5 or CSCC11H3 or STA314H1 or STA314H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO361H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO429H5 • Data analysis in Neurobiology

BIO429H5 • Data analysis in Neurobiology

This course explains the fundamental principles of biological data analysis by focusing on neuroscience datasets. Students will learn methods for sampling data, testing hypotheses, multiple linear regression, PCA, clustering through both lectures and practical exercises. These methods will be discussed in the context of current research in understanding brain functions.

Prerequisites: BIO360H5 or permission of instructor
Exclusions: BIO427H5 or CSC311H1 or CSC311H5 or CSC413H1 or CSC413H5 or CSCC11H3 or STA314H1 or STA314H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT307H5 • Critical Infrastructure Studies

CCT307H5 • Critical Infrastructure Studies

This course explores how infrastructures shape society, culture, and understanding of the human condition. We examine different infrastructures from electric networks to communication networks, data farms, environmental sensing systems, smart cities, and satellite technologies and our reliance on them. We will also examine how these infrastructures are sustained and maintained. By building on critical theories and approaches to infrastructures and their impact, the course investigates the power of infrastructure to establish the conditions of our daily lives.

Prerequisites: CCT218H5
Exclusions: CCT207H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT317H5 • Creative and Experimental Coding

CCT317H5 • Creative and Experimental Coding

This course will instruct students in the use of programming languages such as Python or Processing for novel applications, including cases from animation, design, and information visualization. Appropriate use of code libraries, platforms and programming techniques will be developed. Assessment will be based on both programming and the expressive use of programs in their case context.

Prerequisites: CCT211H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC415H5 • Introduction to Reinforcement Learning

CSC415H5 • Introduction to Reinforcement Learning

Reinforcement learning is a powerful paradigm for modeling autonomous and intelligent agents interacting with the environment, and it is relevant to an enormous range of tasks, including robotics, game playing, consumer modeling and healthcare. This course provides an introduction to reinforcement learning intelligence, which focuses on the study and design of agents that interact with a complex, uncertain world to achieve a goal. We will study agents that can make near-optimal decisions in a timely manner with incomplete information and limited computational resources.

The course will cover Markov decision processes, reinforcement learning, planning, and function approximation (online supervised learning). The course will take an information-processing approach to the concept of mind and briefly touch on perspectives from psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy.

Prerequisites: CSC311H5
Exclusions: CSC498H5 (Winter 2021 and Fall 2021)
Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC478H5 • Robotic Perception

CSC478H5 • Robotic Perception

This course focuses on perception algorithms for robotics applications and sensors. The aim is to provide an understanding of the challenges encountered when deploying perception algorithms on a robot and introduce some of the tools and algorithms typically used to address these challenges. The algorithms will also be implemented and evaluated using real-world data from common use-cases.

Prerequisites: CSC373H5 and ( CSC311H5 or CSC321H5) and CSC376H5
Exclusions: CSC498H5 (Winter 2022)
Recommended Preparation: CSC338H5
Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ECO320H5 • Economic Analysis of Law: Part 1

ECO320H5 • Economic Analysis of Law: Part 1

This course examines the economic basis for law and legal institutions. The topics covered include the microeconomic analysis of property rights, contract law, tort law, crime, and the limitations of economic analysis. The appropriate economic measures of damages in tort and contract cases will be discussed. No previous familiarity with the law is assumed. (This is an economic analysis of legal issues, not a course in law.)

Prerequisites: ECO200Y5 or ECO204Y5 or ECO206Y5
Exclusions: ECO320Y5 or ECO320H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ECO321H5 • Economic Analysis of Law: Part 2

ECO321H5 • Economic Analysis of Law: Part 2

This course is a continuation of ECO320H5 An Economic Analysis of Law: Part 1. The topics covered include the microeconomic analysis of corporate law, law and financial markets, bankruptcy law, intellectual property law, marriage and divorce law and the choice between regulation and the common law.

Prerequisites: ECO320H5
Exclusions: ECO320Y5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS101H5 • Health and Education

EDS101H5 • Health and Education

This course serves as an introduction to theory and research in the related fields of health and education.  Students will learn to identify, address, and manage health-related risk in school environments by deepening their knowledge of holistic and brain-based theory. The course will explore health and wellness as a fundamental human right by addressing proactive approaches through the Determinants of Health and Developmental Assets Framework. Active research will include investigation of school-based policies and practices (e.g, the critique of a new fitness technology, examination of a school food and nutrition program, assessment of a school health campaign). 

Note:
As this is an introductory course to the topic, students are encouraged to take this course in their first or second year as preparation for EDS220H5 Equity and Diversity Studies and EDS388H5 – Internship in the Community. 


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG217H5 • Writing about the Visual Arts

ENG217H5 • Writing about the Visual Arts

This course introduces students to various literary traditions of writing about the visual arts, from the close analysis of images in novels, poems, and essays to verbal forms (such as ekphrasis and calligrammes) that make poetry and fiction out of paintings, photographs, and sculptures. While the puzzle of translating between space-based and time-based arts will be at the centre of our inquiry, the course will also consider texts and books as visual objects; how writers create visual experiences and mental images; and how literary writing is inspired by museums and exhibitions. Students will have opportunities to practice writing about the arts in collaboration with the Blackwood Gallery at UTM and its featured artists, and, when possible, with other Peel Region and Greater Toronto Area artists and galleries.

Prerequisites: 4.0 credits Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG309H5 • Anishinaabe Storytelling and Oral Tradition

ENG309H5 • Anishinaabe Storytelling and Oral Tradition

An introduction to the legends, beliefs, and values of the Anishinaabek Nation. Students will explore literary and non-literary texts, media, and/or performances, spanning traditional and innovative forms, genres, and mediums. Content may include contributions by Basil Johnston, Jane School Craft, George Copway, Richard Wagamese, Winona LaDuke, Margaret Noodin, Drew Hayden Taylor, Louise Erdrich, Waubgeshig Rice, Alan Corbiere, Isaac Murdoch, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Debajehmujig Theatre Group, and Aanmitaagzi.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG318H5 • Eighteenth-Century Women Writers

ENG318H5 • Eighteenth-Century Women Writers

A study of poems, novels, dramas, and prose works by British and American authors such as Mary Astell, Aphra Behn, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Frances Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Eliza Haywood, Hannah More, Judith Sargent Murray, Mercy Otis Warren, Charlotte Smith, Phyllis Wheatley, and Mary Wollstonecraft. Topics may include professionalization and the literary marketplace; domestic labour; motherhood and children’s literature; class and education; personal agency and political engagement; colonialism, slavery, and abolition; Bluestocking culture; and early feminist thought.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG307H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG332H5 • Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature

ENG332H5 • Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature

This course engages with British poetry, drama, and prose from the later seventeenth century through early eighteenth century—a period that saw the restoration of the monarchy, the Glorious Revolution, the Acts of Union, and the transition from Stuart to Hanoverian rule. Topics to be addressed may include religious and political dissent; colonialism and slavery; libertine culture; theatrical performance; female actors and women writers; the “birth” of the novel; and the establishment of the periodical press. Authors may include Aphra Behn, John Bunyan, Susanna Centlivre, Daniel Defoe, John Dryden, Anne Finch, Delarivier Manley, Samuel Pepys, and the Earl of Rochester.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits
Exclusions: ENG308Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG338H5 • Eighteenth-Century British Literature

ENG338H5 • Eighteenth-Century British Literature

This course engages with British poetry, drama, and prose from the “Augustan Age” through the early Romantic period. Topics may include the flourishing of print culture; satirical and sentimental literature; the “rise” of the novel; art and aesthetics; science and technology; colonialism, slavery, and abolition; and women writers. Authors may include Frances Burney, Henry Fielding, Thomas Gray, Eliza Haywood, William Hogarth, Samuel Johnson, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Alexander Pope, Samuel Richardson, Mary Robinson, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, and Jonathan Swift.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG308Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG339H5 • Early Modern Women Writers

ENG339H5 • Early Modern Women Writers

A study of poems, plays, prose fiction, and polemical works by medieval and early modern writers such as Anne Askew, Mary Wroth, Queen Elizabeth I, Mary Sidney, Amelia Lanyer, Lucy Hutchinson, Hester Pulter, and Margaret Cavendish. Topics may include race, women and science, love poetry from a female perspective, gender and trans studies, renarrations of the story of Eve, sexuality, and editorial history and practice.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG307H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG347H5 • The Nineteenth-Century American Novel

ENG347H5 • The Nineteenth-Century American Novel

This course will introduce students to historical and cultural concerns of nineteenth-century America through major subgenres of the novel, including the gothic, the sentimental, realism, and naturalism. Emphasis will be on shifts in the novel across the century as well as the relationship of the nineteenth-century novel to print culture, including serial publication in literary magazines and newspapers. We may also think about how non-fiction texts from this period draw on the conventions of fiction. Authors studied may include Charles Brockden Brown, Fanny Fern, George Lippard, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charles Chesnutt, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, and Pauline Hopkins.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG379H5 • American Literature in Global Contexts

ENG379H5 • American Literature in Global Contexts

We often categorize literature by its nation of origin when we study and teach, though we also recognize the limitations involved in doing so. Over the past several decades, the study of U.S. literature, in particular, has been shaped by transnational and global approaches that emphasize the porous nature of any “national” literature. In this course, students will study approaches to American Literature in global contexts. These may include hemispheric approaches to U.S. literatures that emphasize U.S. interactions with Central America and the Caribbean, engagements with Africa in U.S. literatures, or U.S. literatures and the Pacific from the eighteenth century through the present.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH338H5 • Multicultural Middle Ages

FAH338H5 • Multicultural Middle Ages

This course examines medieval works of art and architecture that challenge long-held ideas about the European Middle Ages as monocultural and exclusively Christian. It considers the mobility of people, objects, and ideas through migration, trade, diplomacy, conquest, and pilgrimage, and focuses on particular places where multiculturalism flourished, including Spain, Sicily, and Venice. It also evaluates multiculturalism from different eras, from the Middle Ages to the contemporary world, to better understand its different meanings and manifestations, as well as its impact on art history.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and ( FAH215H5 or FAH216H5)
Recommended Preparation: At least 1.0 credits at the 200 level in FAH

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE227H5 • Teaching and Learning a Second/Foreign Language

FRE227H5 • Teaching and Learning a Second/Foreign Language

This course provides an introduction to second language pedagogy with a particular focus on French. Students will learn key concepts in pedagogy and compare the teaching and learning processes and experiences of first and second language learners as well as the roles of classroom teachers and learners via the creation of linguistic portraits and pedagogical materials.

Prerequisites: FRE181H5
Exclusions: FRE225Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE272H5 • A Linguistic Introduction to the French Language

FRE272H5 • A Linguistic Introduction to the French Language

This course provides a linguistic introduction to the French language and French-language phenomena. Students will learn to analyze meaning, word, sound, and sentence structure; describe linguistic phenomena including first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, and creoles; and identify the linguistic variation observed among French speakers and speech communities.

Prerequisites: FRE181H5
Exclusions: FRE272Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE282H5 • Intermediate Language Practice: Written French

FRE282H5 • Intermediate Language Practice: Written French

This course develops writing skills at an intermediate level in the areas of vocabulary, grammar, and style. Students will acquire practical tools for understanding and producing French written texts for their university studies and beyond. Emphasis will be placed on developing descriptive, narrative, and argumentative writing skills. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.

Prerequisites: FRE181H5 or FSL305Y5 or equivalent as determined by the department's French Placement Test. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.
Exclusions: FRE282Y5 or FSL321Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE354H5 • Teaching French in a Plurilingual Context

FRE354H5 • Teaching French in a Plurilingual Context

This course allows students to explore innovative pedagogical approaches such as the Action Oriented and Plurilingual & Pluricultural Approaches, building on knowledge and skills acquired in FRE227H5 Teaching and Learning a Second/Foreign Language. This is accomplished through the examination of the linguistic and cultural diversity observed in French Language classes today, and the discovery of innovative and current teaching approaches followed by the creation of pedagogical materials. Particular emphasis is placed on students’ abilities to transfer knowledge into practice.

Prerequisites: FRE227H5 or FRE272Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE377H5 • Phonetics & Phonology of French Foreign Accent

FRE377H5 • Phonetics & Phonology of French Foreign Accent

This course explores the phonetic and phonological properties of second language French learners' speech. Particular emphasis is placed on students' ability to summarize typical characteristics and phenomena of second language speech learning, identify segmental and prosodic features of non-native French including inter-learner variability, and conduct acoustic analyses of real learner speech.

Prerequisites: (( FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and [ FRE280Y5 or ( FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE389H5 • Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition

FRE389H5 • Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition

This course examines the effects of cognitive (e.g., aptitude, working memory) and affective differences (e.g., motivation, L2 anxiety) on second language acquisition. Students will come to understand the nature of these differences via empirical studies on learners of French and the use of assessment instruments including questionnaires and on-line tests. Particular emphasis is placed on students' ability to discuss between-learner differences in comprehension and production, identify relevant individual differences capable of explaining such variability, and conduct their own individual differences research.

Prerequisites: ((FRE225Y or FRE227H or FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and [ FRE280Y5 or ( FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE395H5 • Francophone Media and Global Culture

FRE395H5 • Francophone Media and Global Culture

This course explores media and culture in the Francophone world through textual, graphic, musical and cinematographic content. Students will apply previously acquired knowledge in cultural studies, and their oral and written competences in French to the study of multiple cultural and mediatic forms including movies, graphic novels and songs. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive reading skills as ways of thinking about texts, images and music, and on deploying these skills to better understand the relationship between different Francophone cultures within our contemporary world.

Prerequisites: ( FRE240H5 and [ FRE280Y5 or ( FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC485H5 • Professional Opportunity in Forensic Science

FSC485H5 • Professional Opportunity in Forensic Science

This course provides students with the opportunity to engage in, and reflect on, a professional forensic experience that contributes to their employment eligibility after graduation. They will develop networking skills, enhance professional competencies, and are given the opportunity to locate and select their own experience relevant to their career goals, which may include (but is not limited to) a possible: work-study position, conference workshop, professional certification, field school, paid or unpaid internship or agency co-op. All opportunities must be approved by the program director in the term prior to enrolment.

Prerequisites: Completion of the forensic program statistics course(s) requirement and any third-level IDENT course and permission of instructor.
Corequisites: FSC482H5
Exclusions: FSC483H5 or FSC481Y5
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to Forensic Science Specialists. Course Application required.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR319H5 • Landscapes of Belonging

GGR319H5 • Landscapes of Belonging

Grounded in human geography and qualitative methods, this course investigates the meaningful non-tangible relationships between humankind and environment. These relationships include emotional attachment (to place), aesthetics (of landscape), ethics (of environment), and relationships (to place and to other species). We will examine these ideas through exploration of the geohumanities; ways of seeing or apprehending the world; ways of being in place; ways of translating or reproducing the world; and possible paths forward in the relationship between us and the landscapes around us.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits of which 1.0 credit must be GGR or ENV

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR442H5 • GIS Capstone Project

GGR442H5 • GIS Capstone Project

Students apply prerequisite knowledge and techniques to real-world GIS projects requested by external clients. Through background research, proposal, data management, and implementation, students develop GIS professional competencies, which will be demonstrated through collaboration, presentations and reports.

Prerequisites: [12.0 credits and GGR276H5 and GGR278H5 and (1.0 credit from GGR321H5 or GGR335H5 or GGR337H5 or GGR376H5 or GGR382H5 or GGR463H5) and (1.0 credit from GGR311H5 or GGR370H5 or GGR372H5 or GGR384H5 or GGR437H5 or GGR440H5)] or permission of instructor.

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR444H5 • Space Time Data Analysis

GGR444H5 • Space Time Data Analysis

This course is designed for senior undergraduate students in a workshop format with a specific focus on application. Topics include space-time data collection, processing, analysis, and visualization. Widely used space-time analysis tools and newly developed data mining techniques will be introduced and discussed with examples and hands-on practices in the class. With practical experience on real-world space-time datasets, students will learn the basic knowledge and various tools for analyzing spatiotemporal datasets. The course encompasses practical instruction and training in ArcGIS Pro to use multiple public available space-time datasets. The primary outcome for students taking this course will be an independent analysis of a substantial space-time dataset, a formal report of the analysis, and a professional oral presentation.

Prerequisites: 13.5 credits and GGR321H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HIS301H5 • North Africa and Western Asia Before World War I

HIS301H5 • North Africa and Western Asia Before World War I

A cultural history of North Africa and Western Asia from the 1870s to World War I. This late Ottoman period, known in Europe as the fin de siècle, was marked by imperialisms, nationalisms, and revolutions, as well as anxiety and alienation, environmental degradation, famine, and genocide.

Prerequisites: HIS201H5
Exclusions: HIS392H5 (Winter 2019 and Fall 2020)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HIS337H5 • History of Information and Media

HIS337H5 • History of Information and Media

In (mis)information age, it seems that the more we know, the less we understand. This course examines how data, fact, and information all have their own history, and that their production and circulation are shaped by politics, emotion, capital, as well as mediated by technology.

Exclusions: HIS392H5 (Fall 2019 and Fall 2020)
Recommended Preparation: HIS101H5 or HIS102H5 or HIS103H5 or HIS104H5 or HIS105H5 or HIS106H5 or HIS107H5 or HIS108H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HIS405H5 • Microhistory

HIS405H5 • Microhistory

Microhistory focuses on a small part of the past to address big questions. By encouraging us to examine evidence up close, it provides a powerful way to investigate the rich texture of earlier societies and think about connections with our own time. This course considers classic microhistorical studies as well as more recent works, balancing theories with examples of the approach.

Prerequisites: HIS101H5 or HIS102H5 or HIS103H5 or HIS104H5 or HIS105H5 or HIS106H5 or HIS107H5 or HIS108H5
Exclusions: HIS420H5 (Fall 2020)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HIS464H5 • Decolonizing Africa

HIS464H5 • Decolonizing Africa

This research-intensive seminar looks at alternative histories of decolonization in Africa, including revolutionary nationalisms, secessionist movements, and pan-Africanism– as well as ongoing debates over boundaries, citizenship, and sovereignty in postcolonial Africa.

Prerequisites: HIS101H5 or HIS102H5 or HIS103H5 or HIS104H5 or HIS105H5 or HIS106H5 or HIS107H5 or HIS108H5
Exclusions: HIS493H5 (Winter 2020)
Recommended Preparation: HIS295H5 or HIS325H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

IMI299H5 • Research Opportunity Program

IMI299H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for IMI299H5 course credit. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Social Sciences or Sciences distribution requirement. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Exclusions: Concurrent enrolment in IMI399H5 or IMI499H5.

Mode of Delivery: In Class

IMI399H5 • Research Opportunity Program

IMI399H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a rewarding opportunity for students in their third or fourth year to undertake relatively advanced work in the research project of a professor in return for IMI399H5 course credit. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Social Sciences or Sciences distribution requirement. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: 8.0 credits and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Concurrent enrolment in IMI299H5 or IMI499H5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

IMI499H5 • Research Opportunity Program

IMI499H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a rewarding opportunity for students in their fourth year to undertake relatively advanced work in the research project of a professor in return for IMI499H5 course credit. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Social Sciences or Sciences distribution requirement. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Concurrent enrolment in IMI299H5 or IMI399H5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ISP299H5 • Research Opportunity Program

ISP299H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to participate in the research project of a faculty member in return for 299H course credit. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Exclusions: ISP299Y5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ISP299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

ISP299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to participate in the research project of a faculty member in return for 299Y course credit. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Exclusions: ISP299H5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ISP399H5 • Research Opportunity Program

ISP399H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their third year to participate in the research project of a faculty member in return for 399H course credit. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Exclusions: ISP399Y5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ISP399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

ISP399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their third year to participate in the research project of a faculty member in return for 399Y course credit. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Exclusions: ISP399H5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ISP490Y5 • Independent Reading

ISP490Y5 • Independent Reading

This course is intended to offer students advanced supervised reading and research experience within the areas of writing studies, numeracy, and pedagogy. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Students interested in this course should obtain a supervisor before applying directly to the Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy.


Mode of Delivery: In Class

ISP491H5 • Independent Reading

ISP491H5 • Independent Reading

This course is intended to offer students advanced supervised reading and research experience within the areas of writing studies, numeracy, and pedagogy. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Students interested in this course should obtain a supervisor before applying directly to the Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy.


Mode of Delivery: In Class

LIN341H5 • Linguistics and Computation

LIN341H5 • Linguistics and Computation

How can you get a computer to tell grammatical and ungrammatical sentences apart? How does it know whether 'cricket' refers to the game or the insect in a sentence like "The cricket jumped over the fence"? This course is designed to introduce students with either a background in Linguistics or in the Computing Sciences to the intersection of linguistics and computing, with a focus on the question of how computational algorithms and data structures can be used as a formal model of language. Topics may include finite-state automata for phonology and morphology, context-free grammars, semantic parsing, vector space semantics, computational cognitive modelling, and computational sociolinguistics. No programming skills are required to take the course.

Prerequisites: [( LIN101H5 and LIN102H5) and any 200-level LIN course] or [( CSC108H5 and CSC148H5) and any 200-level CSC course]
Exclusions: CSC485H1 or CSC401H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

LIN387H5 • Theoretical Issues in Teaching and Learning Second Language Vocabulary

LIN387H5 • Theoretical Issues in Teaching and Learning Second Language Vocabulary

This course provides an overview of second language vocabulary acquisition research and the resultant implications for second language teaching. Topics include dimensions of vocabulary knowledge, incidental and intentional vocabulary learning, textbook analysis, learning strategies, and teacher beliefs about vocabulary teaching and learning. Implications are drawn for pedagogical practices, including best vocabulary teaching practices, materials selection, and measuring vocabulary knowledge.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit from LIN228H5 or LIN229H5 or LIN231H5 or LIN232H5 or LIN237H5 or ( LIN256H5 or JAL253H5) or LIN288H5.
Exclusions: LTL387H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

LIN419H5 • Field Methods: A Language Unlocked

LIN419H5 • Field Methods: A Language Unlocked

This course provides experience in language analysis based on elicited data from a native speaker of an understudied language. It emphasizes procedures and techniques and provides an opportunity for first-hand appreciation of linguistic unity and diversity.

Prerequisites: LIN229H5 and LIN231H5 and LIN232H5 and (one of LIN327H5 or LIN328H5 or LIN329H5 or LIN332H5 or LIN337H5 or LIN338H5 or LIN360H5 or LIN366H5 or LIN369H5 or LIN411H5 or LIN418H5 or LIN476H5 or LIN479H5)
Exclusions: JAL401H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

LTL387H5 • Theoretical Issues in Teaching and Learning Second Language Vocabulary

LTL387H5 • Theoretical Issues in Teaching and Learning Second Language Vocabulary

This course provides an overview of second language vocabulary acquisition research and the resultant implications for second language teaching. Topics include dimensions of vocabulary knowledge, incidental and intentional vocabulary learning, textbook analysis, learning strategies, and teacher beliefs about vocabulary teaching and learning. Implications are drawn for pedagogical practices, including best vocabulary teaching practices, materials selection, and measuring vocabulary knowledge. This course is taught in English and is open to students from other disciplines. Written work to be completed in French/Italian for credit towards a Specialist (French or French & Italian) or Major (French/Italian).

Prerequisites: FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5
Exclusions: LIN387H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MGT218H5 • Quantitative Analysis for Management

MGT218H5 • Quantitative Analysis for Management

Acquaints students with the statistical principles that managers need in order to extract information from numerical data, and to understand the formal principles of decision-making under conditions of uncertainty. Covers descriptive statistics, elementary probability, expected values, sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing for normal and binomial data.

Prerequisites: MGM101H5 and MGM102H5
Exclusions: ECO220Y5 and STA218H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MGT299H5 • Research Opportunity Program

MGT299H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides second year undergraduate students, who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods, an opportunity to work in the research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Project descriptions for participating faculty members for the following summer and fall/winter sessions are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MGT373H5 • Machine Learning

MGT373H5 • Machine Learning

This course will introduce the students to a diverse collection of big data and machine learning techniques. These techniques are often aimed at identifying and quantifying various structures in the data to answer business problems and provide managerial insights. Model validation and effective communication of model-based results will be stressed. The course will employ a "whitebox" methodology, which emphasizes an understanding of the algorithmic and statistical model structures. Following leading industry standards, the course will use Python to apply a number of different algorithms to real-world big data.

Prerequisites: MGT201H5 and ( ECO220Y5 or STA218H5)
Exclusions: MGT311H5 (Winter 2021 and Winter 2022)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MGT399H5 • Research Opportunity Program

MGT399H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods an opportunity to work in the research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Project descriptions for participating faculty members for the following summer and fall/winter sessions are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 10.0 credits

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MGT445H5 • Enterprise Risk Management and Analytics

MGT445H5 • Enterprise Risk Management and Analytics

This course studies risk management from a holistic perspective for various institutions (i.e. non-financial and financial). Various risk categories will be considered such as investment risk, financial risk, cyber risk, operational risk, market risk, energy risk, technology risk, etc. Cases, models, and frameworks will be integrated into the course. Depending on current market issues, the data and cases may cover various areas from energy (i.e. weather), sports, accounting, finance, government (public), arts/entertainment, health, technology, etc. Special topics may also be considered such as environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG) issues.

Prerequisites: ECO220Y5 and STA218H5 and MGT231H5 and MGT232H5
Exclusions: MGT416H5 (Winter 2019 and Winter 2020 and Winter 2021 and Winter 2022)
Enrolment Limits: 44

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MGT450H5 • Digital Marketing

MGT450H5 • Digital Marketing

This course explores various digital marketing strategies in the context of online and mobile advertising platforms, and will provide a comprehensive understanding of both existing marketing strategies and emerging trends. Various domains will be covered in this course (search, display, mobile, social, etc.) to enable students to explore how emerging technologies are used to facilitate B2B and B2C transactions. This class will explore the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to digital marketing while helping students develop a better understanding of various elements of marketing campaigns from formulation to integration and assessment.

Prerequisites: MGT252H5
Exclusions: CCT354H5 or MGT414H5 (Winter 2022)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MGT495H5 • Entrepreneurial Finance and Private Equity

MGT495H5 • Entrepreneurial Finance and Private Equity

This course is designed to introduce students to the challenges and pitfalls of financing new enterprises. We can think of entrepreneurial financing decisions in terms of a life cycle. The cycle begins with identifying opportunities and refining the business plan, moves to marshaling resources to take advantage of these opportunities and executing the business plan, and ends with harvesting the venture's success.

Prerequisites: MGT231H5 and MGT232H5
Exclusions: RSM439H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

PHL311H5 • South Asian Philosophy

PHL311H5 • South Asian Philosophy

An intermediate-level course on one or more philosophical traditions from the South Asian world, including orthodox Indian schools (Nyaya, Vaisheshika, Samkhya, Yoga, Mimamsa, and Vedanta) and non-orthodox schools such as Buddhism and Jainism, with a focus on their theories of religion, ethics, epistemology, or metaphysics.


Prerequisites: 1.5 credits in PHL
Exclusions: PHL293H5 (Fall 2020) and PHL390H5 (Fall 2019) and PHL339H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

POL116H5 • Politics & Social Justice

POL116H5 • Politics & Social Justice

​In this course students are introduced to the concept of social justice as a political issue. The course is designed to develop modes of analysis that focus on human rights, economic and social (in)equity, fairness and inclusion. Key concepts may include power, identity, conflict, community, consent, advocacy, inequality, solitary, structural racism, and intersectionality. Specific issues to be considered may include gender equality, racism, justice between generations, spatial inclusion, wealth distribution, and equity in the international realm. The substantive themes and perspective may vary from year to year.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

PSY330H5 • The Basics of Measurement in Social and Personality Psychology

PSY330H5 • The Basics of Measurement in Social and Personality Psychology

In psychology, we often talk about people in relation to concepts like attachment, happiness, and need to belong. But, how do we actually measure these psychological constructs when we cannot see and touch them? Importantly, how can we be sure that research findings are based on good measurement practices and therefore seen as trustworthy? This course explores basic issues of psychometrics – the measurement of psychological constructs -- in social and personality psychology. We will read scholarly literature on psychometrics, discuss good practices for conceptualizing and assessing psychological constructs, and learn about how we can provide evidence for the validity and reliability of people’s responses to measures. We will practice using analytic techniques that examine measurement properties. The student should leave the course with a practical “measurement toolbox” which will allow them to conduct their own psychometric analyses, and better evaluate measurement practices used in social and personality psychology.
Prerequisites: PSY201H5 (or equivalent)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

PSY385H5 • Human Factors: Applying Perceptual and Cognitive Research to the World

PSY385H5 • Human Factors: Applying Perceptual and Cognitive Research to the World

How can understanding perception help to explain what we do in the world? In this course, we will consider questions from engineering and human factors through the lens of perceptual research, tackling the human side of design and engineering problems. Topics include driver behaviour, interface design, data visualization and the perceptual and psychological foundations that dictate their success or failure.

Prerequisites: PSY280H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

PSY389H5 • Perception Laboratory

PSY389H5 • Perception Laboratory

In this course, students will learn how to develop and design experiments to answer scientific questions of their interest in the study of perception. Students will learn psychophysical methods, which relate the physical properties of the world to perceptual experience, and apply these advanced methods by carrying out experiments and analyzing data.

Prerequisites: PSY202H5 (or equivalent) and PSY280H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

RLG300H5 • Religion at the Edge of Tomorrow

RLG300H5 • Religion at the Edge of Tomorrow

What will religion look like in 2100? This course asks how early twenty-first century society is using religion to imagine its future around such questions as climate change, neoliberalism, authoritarian capitalism, pandemics, artificial intelligence, etc. Readings pair history, anthropology, and critical theory with science fiction, news media, and visual culture.

Recommended Preparation: RLG101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

RLG319H5 • Magic, Astrology, and Religion

RLG319H5 • Magic, Astrology, and Religion

This course studies the interplay between religion, magic, and astrology. It analyzes how magic and astrology have been viewed in history by different world religions, and how these religions have integrated, or excluded, magical practices and astrological beliefs in their mainstream practices and beliefs.

Recommended Preparation: RLG101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC305H5 • Asian Canada and Asian Diaspora

SOC305H5 • Asian Canada and Asian Diaspora

The course will introduce students to the core and cutting-edge sociological and interdisciplinary scholarship on Asian Canada and Asian diaspora from transnational perspectives. We will examine the history of Asian migration to North America on the context of colonialism, the Cold War, and capitalist development, as well as the experiences of various Asian immigrant communities in the contemporary era.

Prerequisites: ( SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Recommended Preparation: 200-level course on race and ethnicity

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC308H5 • Law and Crime in Asia and Asian Diasporas

SOC308H5 • Law and Crime in Asia and Asian Diasporas

This course introduces students to the core and cutting-edge sociological and interdisciplinary scholarship on law and crime in Asia and Asian diasporas across the world. It examines major topics in criminology, law and society in various Asian contexts (e.g., legal consciousness, legal pluralism, dispute resolution, policing, rights mobilization, etc.), as well as the experiences of Asian immigrant communities with legal and criminal justice systems. 

Prerequisites: ( SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and ( SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC409H5 • Masculinity and the Internet

SOC409H5 • Masculinity and the Internet

In this course we will take an in-depth look at a number of topics related broadly to masculinity and the internet, including such things as the “manosphere”, incels, and representations of masculinity on social media. These topics will be examined through the lens of the sociological literature on gender and masculinities. A recurring theme relates to the questions: “Is masculinity changing?” Students will be encouraged to critically examine and evaluate these topics and the sociological literature in multiple ways.

Prerequisites: ( SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC422H5 • Sociology of the Body

SOC422H5 • Sociology of the Body

The body is an inevitable part of our existence, but it has not always played a central role in sociology. This course aims to bring the body into sociology by drawing on multiple approaches to theorizing and researching the body as a fundamental element of social interactions. We will work to connect the body to power, social problems and diverse forms of exploitation, but we also examine how the body serves as a source of pleasure, joy, and resistance. Fundamentally, we will study the processes by which bodies are shaped, and in turn, shape our social life. Body topics that may be covered include, but are not limited to, the following: health and illness, fatness, fitness and sport, diet culture, taste, aging, disability, sexuality, beauty, cosmetic surgery, and eating disorders.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and ( SOC205H5 or SOC231H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC426H5 • Social Theory and Third Cinema

SOC426H5 • Social Theory and Third Cinema

This course is an exploration of the societies of Asia, Africa, and Latin America through films created by directors living and working in the Global South. Each week, we’ll pair a social theory reading with a film made in the Global South to explore themes of colonialism, political economy, race, class, gender, power, and history.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and ( SOC205H5 or SOC231H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC427H5 • Politics, Violence, Democracy and Human Rights in Latin America

SOC427H5 • Politics, Violence, Democracy and Human Rights in Latin America

This course examines the transnational, national and local historical, social and political contexts that produce, and is in turn affected by, criminal, state and other forms of violence in Latin America, and the challenges that this poses for the functioning of Latin American democracies and for the everyday life of people in the region, whose human and civil rights are frequently violated.  Examples of transnational factors examined may include the legacies of the Cold War, the impact of the U.S. war on drugs, and the circulation of ideas about punishment throughout the hemisphere. We also contextualize the presence of violence into the historical and contemporary political and social realities of particular Latin American countries.


Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC428H5 • Health, Disability, and Crisis

SOC428H5 • Health, Disability, and Crisis

This course will apply sociological theories of inequality, health, and disability to contemporary problems associated with economic and health crises, including the COVID-19 pandemic. This course integrates both quantitative and qualitative methods across substantive themes, providing an opportunity for students to link theories to data.

Prerequisites: SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Recommended Preparation: SOC350H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SPA219H5 • Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers I

SPA219H5 • Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers I

This course is designed for heritage and native speakers with little to no knowledge of written Spanish who have basic to fluent speaking and comprehension abilities. The course provides foundations in understanding the Spanish grammatical system, opportunities to increase vocabulary and to develop writing skills and the ability to use the language across different contexts including in more formal situations. Students MUST complete the Spanish Language Assessment Questionnaire before enrolling in this course. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires

Prerequisites: As determined by the Spanish Language Assessment (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: SPA100Y5 or SPA219Y5 or SPA219Y1 or SPA220Y5 or SPA220Y1 or SPA319H5 or SPA320Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SPA319H5 • Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers II

SPA319H5 • Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers II

This course is designed for heritage and native speakers with solid reading and writing abilities in Spanish as well as fluent speaking and listening skills. The course provides opportunities to develop a complex Spanish grammatical system as well as opportunities to increase vocabulary, and develop writing skills and the ability to use the language across different contexts including in more formal situations.

Prerequisites: As determined by the Spanish Language Assessment (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: SPA100Y5 or SPA219Y5 or SPA219Y1 or SPA219H5 or SPA220Y5 or SPA220Y1 or SPA319H5 or SPA320Y5 or higher

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SPA390H5 • Crosscultural Communciation and Pragmatics in the Spanish-speaking World

SPA390H5 • Crosscultural Communciation and Pragmatics in the Spanish-speaking World

The course introduces students to the different ways in which speakers communicate across the diverse Spanish-speaking world. Students will analyze how culturally defined politeness, social norms, and speaker identities impact how language is used in diverse Spanish-speaking countries. Students will also explore, identify, and solve problems resulting from cultural differences between Spanish and other languages. Furthermore, students will develop pragmatic competence in Spanish and will compare variation in pragmatic norms among different Spanish-speaking communities.

Corequisites: SPA219Y5 or SPA319H5 or SPA320Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SPA443H5 • Studies in Spanish Linguistics: Pragmatics

SPA443H5 • Studies in Spanish Linguistics: Pragmatics

This course introduces students to the discipline of linguistics through a focus on Spanish- speaking communities and the linguistic diversity amongst them. This advanced task-based course focuses on developing students’ pragmatic competence in Spanish, or the ability to use the language appropriately in different social contexts. To do so, students will analyze how culturally confined politeness norms, contextual elements, and speakers’ identities impact how language is used to carry out different speech acts such as requests, invitations, and apologies, among others, and will compare variation in pragmatic norms among different Spanish-speaking communities.

Prerequisites: SPA320Y5 or ( SPA219Y5 and permission of the instructor)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

UTM108H5 • utmONE: Special Topics at the Intersection of Science and Social Science

UTM108H5 • utmONE: Special Topics at the Intersection of Science and Social Science

This course brings together first-year students to explore a current topic or problem at the intersection of science and social science in a small-group environment. The focus of each section will depend on the instructor’s areas of expertise and will provide students with the opportunity to develop foundational learning strategies and sharpen their academic skills to support the transition into university.

Exclusions: UTM109H5 or UTM110H5 or UTM111H5 or UTM112H5 or UTM113H5 or UTM114H5 or UTM115H5 or UTM116H5 or UTM117H5 or UTM118H5 or UTM119H5 or UTM190H5 or UTM191H5 or UTM192H5 or UTM193H5 or UTM194H5 or UTM195H5 or UTM196H5 or UTM197H5

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

UTM109H5 • utmONE: Special Topics at the Intersection of Science and Humanities

UTM109H5 • utmONE: Special Topics at the Intersection of Science and Humanities

This course brings together first-year students to explore a current topic or problem at the intersection of science and humanities in a small-group environment. The focus of each section will depend on the instructor’s areas of expertise and will provide students with the opportunity to develop foundational learning strategies and sharpen their academic skills to support the transition into university.

Exclusions: UTM108H5 or UTM110H5 or UTM111H5 or UTM112H5 or UTM113H5 or UTM114H5 or UTM115H5 or UTM116H5 or UTM117H5 or UTM118H5 or UTM119H5 or UTM190H5 or UTM191H5 or UTM192H5 or UTM193H5 or UTM194H5 or UTM195H5 or UTM196H5 or UTM197H5

Distribution Requirement: Science, Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

UTM110H5 • utmONE: Special Topics at the Intersection of Social Science and Humanities

UTM110H5 • utmONE: Special Topics at the Intersection of Social Science and Humanities

This course brings together first-year students to explore a current topic or problem at the intersection of social science and humanities in a small-group environment. The focus of each section will depend on the instructor’s areas of expertise and will provide students with the opportunity to develop foundational learning strategies and sharpen their academic skills to support the transition into university.

Exclusions: UTM108H5 or UTM109H5 or UTM111H5 or UTM112H5 or UTM113H5 or UTM114H5 or UTM115H5 or UTM116H5 or UTM117H5 or UTM118H5 or UTM119H5 or UTM190H5 or UTM191H5 or UTM192H5 or UTM193H5 or UTM194H5 or UTM195H5 or UTM196H5 or UTM197H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science, Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

VCC419H5 • Animals in Visual Culture

VCC419H5 • Animals in Visual Culture

In 1977 the influential critic John Berger wrote an essay called “Why Look at Animals?” which framed humans’ relationship with animals as a matter of vision or, as we now say, of visual culture. More recently the humanities have been described as taking an “animal turn,” influenced by posthumanist thought and the idea that we are living in a period of unprecedented human impact on the planet, commonly (yet controversially) known as the Anthropocene. How has visual culture studies developed on or challenged Berger’s insights since he wrote that essay? Building on critiques of the category of “nature” as something that somehow pre-exists “culture” and is outside of it, which in turn challenges the terms of our distinctions between humans and animals, how does recent scholarship approach the place of images and vision in human-animal relations, and indeed the very idea of the animal itself?

This seminar investigates these questions through texts that discuss key theoretical questions and examine representations of animals across a variety of media, species, historical or geographical contexts, and disciplinary approaches.

Prerequisites: ( VCC101H5 or FAH101H5) and a minimum of 1.0 VCC credit.
Exclusions: VCC490H5 - Animals in Visual Culture Fall 2018
Recommended Preparation: FAH275H5 or FAH375H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

WGS348H5 • Sex, Gender, and the Environment

WGS348H5 • Sex, Gender, and the Environment

This course discusses, historicizes, and theorizes the undeniable connection between the health of our bodies and the health of our planet. This course engages with Indigenous feminisms, Black feminisms, and queer/decolonial/anticolonial thought to build a response to historic and ongoing colonial, gender-based, and environmental violence through grounded justice practices.

Prerequisites: WGS101H5 or WGS200Y5
Recommended Preparation: ANT241H5 or GGR202H5 or SOC228H5 or WGS102H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

WRI293H5 • Introduction to Technical Communication

WRI293H5 • Introduction to Technical Communication

Introduction to Technical Communication serves as an introduction to the academic and professional fields of technical writing and communication. It explores strategies for analyzing organizational contexts, including professional audiences, professional purposes for writing, and organizational cultures. Assignments will build skills in technical writing, document design, documentation, accessibility, and ethical considerations for communication in professional settings.

Prerequisites: WRI173H5 or WRI203H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class