Programs and Courses

New Program

Chinese Language & Culture - Minor (Arts)

Chinese Language & Culture - Minor (Arts)

The Minor in Chinese Language and Culture is for advanced language learners who would like to improve their written and oral communication skills in both academic and professional settings. Students in this program will also advance their linguistic knowledge and cultural literacy from cross-cultural perspectives.

Enrolment Requirements:

Enrolment in this program is limited and based on completion of 4.0 credits, including:

  • CHI211H5 and CHI212H5 (with an average grade of 63% across both courses); and
  • a minimum CGPA of 2.3.

NOTE: The Chinese Language Minor is intended for students who have near-native proficiency level in Chinese so that they can be fully engaged in course materials and lectures conducted in Chinese. Students’ proficiency level will be evaluated based on the language placement questionnaire first. If the results of the questionnaire meet the language proficiency requirement, students will be permitted to enrol in courses. If the results are not satisfying or borderline, a one-on-one interview with Professor Chiu-Hung Chen will be arranged in order to determine students’ qualification for enroling in courses.

Completion Requirements:

4.0 credits are required.


ERMIN2021 | Program Area: Chinese

Technology, Coding & Society - Major (Arts)

Technology, Coding & Society - Major (Arts)

The Technology, Coding, and Society (TCS) major program focuses on the impact of technologies, including hardware, platform and associated software, on people and on society more generally. Students learn essential computer coding skills, are taught theories on the use of digital platforms from humanistic and social science perspectives, learn to analyze the data that digital platforms produce, and then apply these concepts through practical labs and through optional work-integrated learning opportunities. Since the TCS Major is within the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology (ICCIT), students can concurrently obtain a Professional Experience Certificate in Digital Media, Communication, and Technology from ICCIT.

Enrolment Requirements:

Limited Enrolment — Admission is based on academic performance (CGPA) in a minimum of 4.0 credits that must include CCT109H5, CCT110H5 and CCT111H5. Enrolment in this program is determined annually and is limited to students who have a CGPA of at least 2.4. Tuition fees for students enrolling in any CCIT Specialist/Major programs will be higher than for other Arts and Science programs.

Completion Requirements:

8.0 credits are required including at least 3.5 at the 300/400 level. Program must be taken in
combination with another major or two minors.

First Year: (1.5 credits required)

Second Year: (3.0 credits required)

Third and Higher Years: (3.5 credits required)


Note:

1. 300/400-level CCT courses are restricted to students in ICCIT programs only.
2. It is your responsibility to ensure that the prerequisites for courses listed in the calendar have been met. Students without the prerequisites can be removed at any time. No waivers will be granted.


ERMAJ1040 | Program Area: Communication, Culture, Information and Technology

New Courses

ANT353H5 • Queer Bodies: Gender, Disability, and Illness

ANT353H5 • Queer Bodies: Gender, Disability, and Illness

This course explores key concepts in medical anthropology, disability studies, and gender and queer studies by examining how gender and sexuality matter in the contexts of illness and disability across a range of institutional, social, and national contexts. Students will learn to think critically about the body as a site of power configured in the social and material fields of heath/illness, dis/ability, race, and gender and sexuality.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT381H5S - Special Topics in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology (Winter 2021)
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/12S

ANT355H5 • Disabled Cyborgs and Racist Robots: Bodies, Technologies, and Social Justice

ANT355H5 • Disabled Cyborgs and Racist Robots: Bodies, Technologies, and Social Justice

How does technology mediate our ideas about the social differences of disability, race, and gender? By rethinking the role of technology in reproducing social disparities and challenging bioethical debates about enhancement, students will emerge with the tools to reimagine the relationship between technology, the human body, and social justice.

Prerequisites: 8.0 credits of which 0.5 credits must be a social sciences or humanities course at the 200-level or higher
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/12S

ANT397Y5 • Independent Study

ANT397Y5 • Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading and initial research planning on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department
Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science

ANT398Y5 • Independent Reading

ANT398Y5 • Independent Reading

This independent reading course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department
Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science

ANT455H5 • TOXIC! The anthropology of toxicity

ANT455H5 • TOXIC! The anthropology of toxicity

The presence of toxic chemicals is a defining feature of contemporary life. But while toxicity is everywhere, it is not everywhere the same. Considering toxicity through medical and environmental anthropology, science and technology studies, and environmental justice, we will gain new perspectives on the politics of evidence, the nature of health, and the nature of nature. Creative, hands-on assignments will help us understand the toxic worlds around us at UTM.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT433H5S - Advanced Seminar in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology (Winter 2021)
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

ANT467H5 • Are Media Turning Humans into Cyborgs?

ANT467H5 • Are Media Turning Humans into Cyborgs?

The contemporary world is profoundly shaped by mass media. We might even ask if media technologies have changed what it means to be human. Democratic politics, globalized economic flows, and new religious practices all depend on modern technologies of communication, as does the discipline of anthropology. How might we make sense of how social media, television, radio, and film have shaped our lives from an ethnographic perspective? In this course, we will pursue this question through a series of studies of media use, production, and circulation in a wide range of cultural contexts, including the exploring centrality of media to the production of anthropological knowledge. Developing some of the themes that students might have been exposed to in ANT102H5 (Introduction to Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology) and ANT204H5 (Sociocultural Anthropology), students will also be guided in pursuing their own research interests in this upper-level seminar.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5 or permission of the department
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

ANT498Y5 • Advanced Independent Study

ANT498Y5 • Advanced Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading, research and planning for a publishable report on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the research and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department
Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science

ANT499H5 • Advanced Independent Research

ANT499H5 • Advanced Independent Research

This independent research course is designed to offer students advanced supervised research and writing of a publishable report on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the research and writing program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department
Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science

ARA400Y5 • Advanced Arabic for Heritage Learners

ARA400Y5 • Advanced Arabic for Heritage Learners

This course develops the student's communication skills in grammar, writing, reading, and formal registers of speaking, into an advanced level. It caters to the students who have completed the intermediate high level: ARA300, or whose language assessment reflects an intermediate level of proficiency of Arabic as a heritage language. The teaching of this course will also focus on error analysis to develop the student’s ability to distinguish between their version of heritage spoken language and that of the erudite Arabic, الفُصْحى, as used formally across the Arab world. By the end of the course, the student will be able to write in a formal academic register, sustain oral expressions and deliver oral presentations in formal Arabic.

Prerequisites: ARA300Y5 or appropriate language level as indicated by the language assessment questionnaire (www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/ara-language-course-assessment-que…).
Exclusions: ARA412Y5 and NML410Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P

AST221H5 • Astrophysics I – Planets, Sun and Stars

AST221H5 • Astrophysics I – Planets, Sun and Stars

This course explores the astrophysics of planets, Sun and stars, including their observed variety, structure, formation and evolution.

Prerequisites: AST110H5 and [(MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5] and (PHY146H5 and PHY147H5)
Exclusions: AST221H1
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

AST222H5 • Astrophysics II – Stellar Systems, Galaxies and the Universe

AST222H5 • Astrophysics II – Stellar Systems, Galaxies and the Universe

This course explores the astrophysics of the Milky Way, other galaxies, and the Universe.

Prerequisites: AST221H5
Exclusions: AST222H1
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

AST320H5 • Astrophysics III – Formation and Evolution of Astronomical Objects

AST320H5 • Astrophysics III – Formation and Evolution of Astronomical Objects

This course explores the formation, equilibrium and evolution of structure on all astronomical scales, from the smallest to the largest: stars, gas clouds, clusters of stars, the Milky Way, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and the whole universe.

Prerequisites: AST222H5
Exclusions: AST320H1
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

BIO332H5 • Biology Field Research

BIO332H5 • Biology Field Research

A two-week Biology field research experience offered in one of the summer terms. The location, subject of the research, and instructor will change according to a regular cycle. Details will be made available on the Department of Biology website well in advance of a change to location. Please note that this course can only be completed once. There will be additional costs for travel and accommodation.

Prerequisites: 6.0 credits and current registration in a Biology, Ecology, Environment/Geography or Earth Science program and permission of the instructor. Appropriate upper level BIO prerequisite core course requirements will be posted on the Biology department website. Any additional unique prerequisites for the course will be posted one year in advance of the move to a new location or with a change of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: STA215H5 or equivalent 200-level STA course
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/80P

CCT112H5 • Introduction to Management in the Networked Information Economy

CCT112H5 • Introduction to Management in the Networked Information Economy

This course introduces students to the foundational principles and analytical tools from the management discipline that are appropriate for understanding enterprises in the context of the networked information economy. Particular emphasis is given to the interconnections between information and communications technologies, innovation, the role of managers and their decision-making processes, and related social, cultural, and economic institutions.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

CCT219H5 • Media Economics I (DEM)

CCT219H5 • Media Economics I (DEM)

This course presents economic principles that explain how markets help organize exchange and production among competing but nevertheless cooperating economic units. Theories of consumer demand, the economic nature and function of business firms, optimal business decision rules of monopoly, oligopoly, and anti-combines regulations, as well as game theory, are presented. Efficiency criteria pertaining to the operation of firms and markets, the role of property rights, and the scope for public policy, are also examined.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5 and CCT112H5
Exclusions: CCT319H5 or ECO100Y5 or (ECO101H5 or ECO102H5)
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

CCT435H5 • Media and Outer Space

CCT435H5 • Media and Outer Space

Examines the relationship between media studies and Outer Space inhabitation and exploration. Through analysis of military, technological, industrial, scientific, design, artistic, and civilian projects, films, novels, science fictions, and other media forms, the class investigates and reveals the historical, social, cultural, and political implications of our mediated relation with Outer Space. Technologies and topics include: the space race and the Cold War, space imagery, extreme environments, space travel, space suits, space vehicles, and space habitats, satellites, extra-terrestrial intelligence, mining, extraction, terraforming, radiation, gravity, and levitation.


Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 university credits
Exclusions: CCT495H5
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

CCT440H5 • Power, Privilege and Technology

CCT440H5 • Power, Privilege and Technology

How is social inequality reproduced and encoded in technology systems and in digital media? In what ways do technology and media creations inform and influence perceptions, beliefs, and practices that impact girls and women, communities of colour, Indigenous groups, LGBTQ+ and other minoritized people? This course will address overlapping and intersectional issues of power, privilege, oppression, and sociotechnical imaginaries - all related to networks, big data and predictive analytics, algorithms, digital gig economies, and interactive multimedia like social media and virtual reality.

Prerequisites: CCT200H5 and CCT222H5
Exclusions: CCT395H5
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

CCT486H5 • Digital Platforms: A Global Perspective

CCT486H5 • Digital Platforms: A Global Perspective

From Apple, Amazon, and Facebook to LINE, WeChat and Tik Tok, digital platforms dominate contemporary life. This course provides an intellectual voyage of the global spread of digital platforms from the days when they were not yet recognized as platforms to the contemporary era when users can hardly think of an internet without platforms. We will explore questions concerning the penetration of platforms into the social fabric of our digital life on a global scale while paying attention to the local conditions and specificity. Students will engage with key concepts, theories, and approaches related to platform studies through readings and discussions about different types of platforms, ranging from e-commerce and social media to live-streaming and on-demand service matching.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 University credits
Exclusions: CCT490H5
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

CHI314H5 • Chinese Culture through Media

CHI314H5 • Chinese Culture through Media

This course examines Chinese cultural traditions and values through contemporary media produced in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Background readings and literary works will provide students with the necessary historical and cultural context for each work. Class discussions will focus on the political, social and cultural transformations presented in the media. Special attention will be paid to topics such as family, class issues, gender and identity.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5 or appropriate language level as indicated in the language assessment questionnaire.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P

CHI403H5 • Advanced Chinese I

CHI403H5 • Advanced Chinese I

This course, designed for second-language learners of Mandarin Chinese, aims to: 1) develop listening and speaking skills in handling most informal and some formal communicative tasks; 2) strengthen reading and writing skills in expository and persuasive essays on familiar cultural and social topics; 3) cultivate cultural knowledge that facilitates effective intercultural communication.

Prerequisites: CHI304H5 or appropriate language level as indicated in the language assessment questionnaire.
Exclusions: EAS401H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P

CHI404H5 • Advanced Chinese II

CHI404H5 • Advanced Chinese II

This course, designed for second-language learners of Mandarin Chinese, is the second half of Advanced Chinese. It continues to: 1) develop listening and speaking skills in handling most informal and some formal communicative tasks; 2) strengthen reading and writing skills in expository and persuasive essays on familiar cultural and social topics; and 3) cultivate cultural knowledge that facilitates effective intercultural communication.

Prerequisites: CHI403H5 or appropriate language level as indicated in the language assessment questionnaire.
Exclusions: EAS402H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P

CHM436H5 • Metal-based Chemistry for Synthesis of Small Molecules and Functional Materials

CHM436H5 • Metal-based Chemistry for Synthesis of Small Molecules and Functional Materials

Modern metal-mediated (inorganic) reactions useful in organic synthesis. Applications of advanced organometallic chemistry. Selected solid-state compounds: metal-organic frameworks, nanoparticles and related materials for separation, catalysis, diagnostics.

Prerequisites: CHM231H5 and CHM243H5
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

CIN315H5 • From Script to Screen

CIN315H5 • From Script to Screen

This is a screenwriting course where students will be introduced to key narrative tools, scriptwriting conventions and components so they can develop an understanding and appreciation of the process from script to screen. From a comparative analysis of screenplays and completed short and feature films with varying budgets in the global cinema landscape, students will learn to use freely available specialized software to craft their own short film materials, including logline, synopsis, treatment, and screenplay.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P

CIN317H5 • Production: Independent Cinema

CIN317H5 • Production: Independent Cinema

What can the title cards and credits of a film tell us about its journey to the screen?

Outside of the studio system model adopted in various countries, there are established pathways and structures for the development, financing, production, sales, distribution and exhibition of independent cinema. This class asks how, from idea to completion, an independent film is able to find funding and reach an international audience. Focusing on the transnational ecosystems that sustain the passage of independent cinema around the world, we will examine case studies of films from Asia, Europe and North America.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P

CIN410H5 • Creating Mobile Cinemas

CIN410H5 • Creating Mobile Cinemas

This class will introduce students to low-budget aesthetic approaches to cinema across fiction and documentary genres. The class will involve a hybrid of cinema research and creation. During the first half of the semester, we will study a selection of feature-length works and shorts. The second half of the semester will be dedicated towards students creating 10-15 minute pieces of their own inspired by what they have studied.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 and 1.0 at the 300/400-level in CIN
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24P/24S

CIN430H5 • Making a Short Film

CIN430H5 • Making a Short Film

This is a production course that introduces students to the four stages of filmmaking: development, production, post production, and release. Through learning the practical aspects of filmmaking such as scriptwriting, budgeting, key crew positions, basic technical proficiency of equipment, and understanding the film festival circuit and online platform, students will make a 5-10 minute fiction short film. Equipment and funds will not be provided but students will be able to complete the assignments on a smartphone with recommendation of free video editing software.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 and 1.0 credit at the 300/400-level in CIN
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24P/24S

CLA207H5 • Introduction to Greek and Roman Literature

CLA207H5 • Introduction to Greek and Roman Literature

This course provides an introduction to Greek and Roman literature. Detailed interpretations of key works from a variety of genres are complemented by discussions of more general issues like literacy levels, orality, literary rhetoric, performance contexts and intertextuality.

Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

CLA220H5 • Introduction to Greek and Roman Archaeology

CLA220H5 • Introduction to Greek and Roman Archaeology

This course introduces students to archaeology in the ancient Mediterranean, covering key archaeological methods and material from the Greek Bronze Age through the Roman Empire. Students develop essential skills to recognize and analyze ancient material culture.

Exclusions: CLA210H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

CLA307H5 • Greek and Roman Lyric Poetry

CLA307H5 • Greek and Roman Lyric Poetry

This course discusses Greek and Roman lyric poetry in its wider literary, cultural and political contexts. Poets who will be discussed include, among others, Sappho, Theocritus, Catullus and Horace. Some of the poems featured in this course belong to the best and most beautiful literature written in Graeco-Roman antiquity.

Prerequisites: CLA207H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

CLA337H5 • Pompeii and Herculaneum: Everyday Life and Death in Roman Cities

CLA337H5 • Pompeii and Herculaneum: Everyday Life and Death in Roman Cities

Focusing on Roman Pompeii and Herculaneum, this course studies the experiences of townspeople: the freeborn (male and female), freed persons, and slaves; the demography of a Roman town and its public infrastructure; the interior design of Roman houses; local politics; leisure activities; economy; and religious beliefs and funerary practices.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA391H5 (Winter 2019)
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

CSC475H5 • Introduction to Reinforcement Learning

CSC475H5 • Introduction to Reinforcement Learning

This course provides an introduction to reinforcement learning intelligence, which focuses on the study and design of agents that interact with a complex, uncertain world to achieve a goal. The course covers Markov decision processes, reinforcement learning, planning, and function approximation (online supervised learning). Applications to computer vision, robotics, etc. are explored, and common RL algorithms are analyzed and implemented.

Prerequisites: CSC311H5 and STA256H5
Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P

ECO101H5 • Principles of Microeconomics

ECO101H5 • Principles of Microeconomics

An introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of microeconomic theory, including: price determination through supply and demand, market failure, microeconomic theories of households and firms, and market structure.

Exclusions: ECO100Y5 or ECO101H1 or ECO100Y1 or ECO105Y1 or MGEA01H3 or MGEA02H3
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

ECO102H5 • Principles of Macroeconomics

ECO102H5 • Principles of Macroeconomics

An introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of macroeconomic theory, including: the determination and measurement of national income, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy in closed and open economies.

Prerequisites: ECO101H5 or ECO101H1
Exclusions: ECO100Y5 or ECO102H1 or ECO100Y1 or ECO105Y1 or MGEA05H3 or MGEA06H3
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

ECO313H5 • Environmental Economics

ECO313H5 • Environmental Economics

Application of economics to the field of environmental and natural resource economics. This course uses economic theory and empirical evidence to address important environmental issues, such as management of renewable and non-renewable resources, and different forms of environmental regulation and pollution control. The course will focus on market based instruments, such as tradeable pollution rights, and climate change problems.

Prerequisites: (ECO200Y5 or ECO204Y5 or ECO206Y5) and (ECO220Y5 or ECO227Y5 or 1.0 credit from STA256H5 or STA258H5 or STA260H5)
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

EDS291H5 • Black Education

EDS291H5 • Black Education

This course investigates first-hand experiences and contributions of black students and teachers in the Canadian education system. Historical, systemic barriers to access will be studied along with current policy, practice and teaching pedagogies that aim to produce systems of education without oppression. By looking specifically at research focused on black schooling in Ontario, students will engage in policy analysis and assess current Afrocentric schooling models to assess effectiveness in eliminating educational inequality. Drawing on principles of equity and diversity, Afrofuturist scholarship will be emphasized and provide the framework that seeks to understand and investigate the past to better inform education’s future.


Recommended Preparation: EDS220H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

ENG310H5 • Modern South Asian Literature in English

ENG310H5 • Modern South Asian Literature in English

The English language belongs not just to the British conquerors, but also (and perhaps more so) to the artists and writers, the poets and politicians of the colonized world. From Rabindranath Tagore’s mystical poetry to Slumdog Millionaire, the styles and aesthetics of South Asian English are as vast as the peninsula itself, and the literature that has emerged from this diverse region has utterly reshaped contemporary global culture. Additionally, we will take up select contemporary criticism on subaltern studies, postcolonialism, and narratology. Authors will include Anand, Naipaul, Narayan, Suleri, Rushdie, Roy, Lahiri, as well as select works of poetry, film, and visual art.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG317H5 • Drama of the Global South

ENG317H5 • Drama of the Global South

This course compares works of selected playwrights of the Global South in an effort to understand their refashioning of postcolonial perspectives and subaltern histories. Ranging beyond the West and its theatrical traditions, the course will explore innovative theatrical performances that focus on South-South affiliations and link discourses, places, and people positioned between peripheries. Students will learn about traditions of orality, cultural pluralities, and indigenous mythic/folk styles that constitute the unique syncretism of South-South theatre cultures. Writers may include Padmanabhan, Nadeem, Jinghui, Taha, Fugard, Aidoo, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Miri, Walcott, Triana, and Dorfman.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG334H5 • Global Indigenous Literatures

ENG334H5 • Global Indigenous Literatures

This course studies Indigenous literatures from around the world. Regions may include the Americas, the Pacific Islands, New Zealand, Australia, Asia, Africa, Russia, and Scandinavia. Through these literatures, the course addresses topics such as: the specific and localized ways colonialism manifests and exerts power; UNDRIP (the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples); the distinct experiences, histories, storytelling traditions, and decolonization processes of Indigenous peoples from different regions; how and why decolonization processes shift from one part of the world to another; and movements and experiences that bring Indigenous peoples from various regions together in solidarity.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG346H5 • Indigenous Literatures of Tkaronto

ENG346H5 • Indigenous Literatures of Tkaronto

This course examines Indigenous texts set in the Tkaronto/Toronto area to provide a fuller understanding of the ongoing Indigenous histories, treaties, laws, experiences, and stories of the area in which we live, work, and learn. Through studying Indigenous literatures to deepen this understanding, the course asks students to reflect on what it means to be treaty people within this territory, the responsibilities of living in the Tkaronto/Toronto area, and how to be more mindful residents within this space and place. Texts may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, visual art, film, and drama. The course may also include land-based and autoethnographic components.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG348H5 • Special Topic in Indigenous Storywork

ENG348H5 • Special Topic in Indigenous Storywork

Applying decolonial and Indigenous methodologies, students will explore Indigenous texts, media, and/or performances, spanning traditional and innovative forms, genres, and mediums engaged by Indigenous writers and makers. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG351H5 • Toni Morrison: Texts and Contexts

ENG351H5 • Toni Morrison: Texts and Contexts

In this advanced introduction to the work of Toni Morrison, we will encounter masterpieces such as Sula, Song of Solomon, and Beloved and pay particular attention to questions of literary tradition and inheritance, form and narrative voice, and ethics in contexts of oppression. We will read most of Morrison’s novels, alongside major essays, in the chronological order in which they were published. Students will be introduced to major themes in African American literary criticism and theory through close engagement with Morrison’s oeuvre and its critical legacy.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG355H5 • Black British Literature

ENG355H5 • Black British Literature

This course is an advanced introduction to the concept and key texts of ‘Black British literature.’ A term arising directly in response to empire and the postcolonial, Black British literature indicates texts written by both African- and South Asian- descended writers from the Caribbean, Africa, and the subcontinent. Focused primarily on the twentieth-century, we will contextualize this literary tradition within wider questions of Britain in the world and how the idea of literary influence is challenged and re-formed. Writers may include: Sam Selvon, Hanif Kureishi, Derek Walcott, Stuart Hall, Buchi Emecheta, Caryl Philips, Zadie Smith, Helen Oyeyemi, and Warsan Shire.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG356H5 • Caribbean Literature

ENG356H5 • Caribbean Literature

A multi-lingual and multi-racial archipelago, the Caribbean has a rich literary and theoretical tradition: this course will introduce students to major figures in Caribbean Anglophone literature (including Jean Rhys, Kamau Brathwaite, George Lamming, Erna Brodber, V.S. Naipaul, Jamaica Kincaid, in addition to some texts read in English translation (including Aimé Cesaire, Alejo Carpentier, Maryse Condé, Marie Vieux Chauvet)

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG359H5 • Indigenous Sovereignty and Storytelling

ENG359H5 • Indigenous Sovereignty and Storytelling

This course examines how Indigenous stories assert ongoing and inherent Indigenous sovereignty, with emphasis on the North American context. Indigenous stories document how Indigenous peoples continue to practice their lifeways as they always have, despite colonial encroachment. Through Indigenous writings, this course examines concepts like self-government, self-determination, and the politics of recognition. Topics covered may include Indigenous futurisms, online sovereignty, treaty-making, Indigenous feminisms, sovereign eroticism, Indigenous political movements, decolonization, and land-based organizing. Texts may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, film, and drama from writers such as Tenille Campbell, Glen Coulthard, Winona Laduke, Tracey Lindberg, Audra Simpson, and Leanne Betasamosake Simpson.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG367H5 • African American Literature

ENG367H5 • African American Literature

This class is an advanced introduction to the field of African American literary studies, tracing its origins and emergence through the slave trade to the present day, with particular focus on nineteenth- and twentieth-century writing, and the criticism and theory to which it gives rise. Authors studied may include: Harriet Jacobs, Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, James Baldwin, Gayl Jones, Toni Morrison.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG368H5 • Black Feminist Poetics

ENG368H5 • Black Feminist Poetics

This course considers the relationship between poetry written by Black women (particularly June Jordan, Audre Lorde, and Lucille Clifton) and Black feminist theory (bell hooks, Angela Davis, the Combahee River Collective). In addition to a grounding in this 20th-century moment, the course will also consider nineteenth-century example (including Sojourner Truth and Ida B. Wells) and the contemporary moment, consider a wide arc of how Black feminism produces and arises from Black poetics.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG369H5 • Black Women’s Writing

ENG369H5 • Black Women’s Writing

This course takes as its focus the intersection of race and gender as explored and expressed in diasporic Black women’s writing. With a focus on North America, we will ask about the relationships amongst self-expression and genre under conditions of disempowerment. This course introduces contemporary thinking about race and colonial encounters alongside fiction and life-writing by African American, Canadian, and Caribbean women from a range of historical periods. Authors may include: Mary Prince, Harriet Jacobs, Audre Lorde, Jamaica Kincaid, Edwige Danticat, Dionne Brand.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG388H5 • Spaces of Fiction

ENG388H5 • Spaces of Fiction

Real or imagined geographical locations, landscapes, rooms and houses play an important role in literature. In addition to providing a narrative setting, fictional space might guide our interpretation of plot, serve as a metaphor for broader historical, sociological or psychological issues, or become a character in its own right. Ranging across a variety of literary periods and genres, this course will explore how works of fiction describe space and how these descriptions shape our responses. Authors and texts may range from the early English period to the present day, including Beowulf, Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Margaret Cavendish, Jane Austen, Edgar Alan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Virginia Woolf, Daphne du Maurier, Shirley Jackson, Gloria Naylor, Toni Morrison, Arundhati Roy, Amitav Ghosh, V.S. Naipaul, and so on.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

ENG400H5 • Capstone Seminar: Writing a Research Project

ENG400H5 • Capstone Seminar: Writing a Research Project

This course offers specialists and advanced majors an opportunity to do sustained and intensive research on a topic developed in consultation with the instructor. Course instruction will consist of training in various research methodologies, advice and help in putting together reading and research lists, and guided workshops where students can practice drafting, editing, and peer editing as well as comparing notes and research materials.

Prerequisites: Completion of 14.5 credits.
Enrolment Limits: English Specialists have priority for registration, followed by English Majors.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

FAH317H5 • Spirit Photography

FAH317H5 • Spirit Photography

From the haunted images of William Mumler in the 1860’s to contemporary manifestations of digital ghost hunting, the search for elusive and invisible spirits by means of the camera lens has been an ongoing preoccupation in the history of photography for over 150 years. Starting with the emergence of phantasmagoric visual entertainments (ca. 1800), this course reviews this rich and fascinating history in Europe and North America but also with a few non-Western cultural examples (e.g., Japan, Philippines) focusing on key case studies in spirit photographic practice. The course considers various reasons why people have wanted to believe in the veracity of these phenomena (e.g., followers of the religious movement of Spiritualism) as well as why others have wanted to debunk spirit photography as a hoax or fraud (e.g., Harry Houdini and P.T. Barnum). Exploring theories derived from deconstruction and psychoanalysis, we seek to understand the philosophical and psychological significance of spirit photography introducing constructs such as hauntology, spectrality, the uncanny, and the work of mourning. The course also reviews how contemporary artists (e.g., Oursler, Beloff) have incorporated motifs and themes related to spirit photography in their works.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or VCC101H5) and FAH291H5
Exclusions: FAH492H5 (Fall 2017)
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

FRE343H5 • Indigenous Literatures in Quebec and Francophone Canada

FRE343H5 • Indigenous Literatures in Quebec and Francophone Canada

The course explores Indigenous literatures in Francophone Canada including Indigenous texts and authors from Quebec. The works discussed engage with issues of sovereignty, anti-racism, Native identity and gender, and span multiple genres including fiction, theatre, poetry and essay.

Prerequisites: [FRE240Y5 or (FRE240H5 and FRE241H5)] and (FRE280Y5 or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5)
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

FSC335H5 • Forensic Theory

FSC335H5 • Forensic Theory

This course will explore and discuss the basic role of a forensic scientist and what it means to be scientifically informed.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 and FSC271H5
Enrolment Limits: Priorty given to FSC Specialists, Majors and then Minors.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S

FSC361H5 • Mental Illness and the Criminal Justice System

FSC361H5 • Mental Illness and the Criminal Justice System

This course will develop students’ knowledge of forensic mental health issues throughout the criminal justice system, including the nature and extent of mental illness in our society and the various legal, social and ethical issues that arise when a mentally disordered individual comes into contact with the criminal justice system. Topics to be explored include: the medical and legal definitions of mental disorder and their relationship to each other; the criteria for state-compelled treatment and how it impinges upon individual autonomy; the changing views of the justice system’s duty to accommodate victims and witnesses with mental health issues; fitness to stand trial and the defense of not criminally responsible; and the Review Board process.

Prerequisites: FSC271H5
Exclusions: FSC350H5 (Special Topics in Forensic Science: Mental Health & the Law)
Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to FSC Specialists, FSC Majors and FSC Minors
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

FSC439H5 • Forensic Anthropology Case Analysis

FSC439H5 • Forensic Anthropology Case Analysis

This course offers a case-based approach to forensic anthropology. Students will critically evaluate real forensic anthropological cases, in addition to completing their own mock cases - from the transfer of evidence to a mock trial.

Prerequisites: ANT439H5
Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to Forensic Anthropology Specialists
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P

HIS105H5 • A Brief History of Capitalism

HIS105H5 • A Brief History of Capitalism

This course offers a history of capitalism. In twelve weeks, we study nearly six hundred years of human history, examining how the profit motive has reshaped lives, landscapes, and values. We consider how the drive to accumulate capital has given rise to distinctive legal, racial, and religious regimes.

Exclusions: HIS101H5 and HIS102H5 and HIS103H5 and HIS104H5 and HIS106H5 and HIS107H5 and HIS108H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

HIS106H5 • A History of Sex

HIS106H5 • A History of Sex

This course examines the history of sex, the history of the body, and the history of sexuality from the past to the present. Topics include the construction of sexual identities (including non-normative sexualities); desire and its regulation; and the porous boundaries between sex and gender, especially in relationship to trans history.

Exclusions: HIS101H5 and HIS102H5 and HIS103H5 and HIS104H5 and HIS105H5 and HIS107H5 and HIS108H5.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

HIS107H5 • Critical Historiography

HIS107H5 • Critical Historiography

This writing-intensive course introduces students to critical historical thinking and writing in the humanities and social sciences and explores the emergence of History as a field of academic inquiry. By learning to reason and to write historically, students in this course will acquire the foundational skills that are essential for their educational success in higher level courses.

Exclusions: HIS101H5 and HIS102H5 and HIS103H5 and HIS104H5 and HIS105H5 and HIS106H5 and HIS108H5.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

HIS108H5 • Encounters Across the Atlantic

HIS108H5 • Encounters Across the Atlantic

The movement of people, goods, and ideas across the Atlantic Ocean changed the world and shaped the modern age. This course considers how contact among Indigenous Americans, Africans, and Europeans between 1000 and 1800 contributed to ideologies of conquest and colonization; the development of a global economy; forced and voluntary migration on an unprecedented scale; and new forms of resistance.

Exclusions: HIS101H5 and HIS102H5 and HIS103H5 and HIS104H5 and HIS105H5 and HIS106H5 and HIS107H5.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

HIS255H5 • Introduction to Histories of Extraction and the Environment

HIS255H5 • Introduction to Histories of Extraction and the Environment

An introduction to the historical and ongoing disruptions of colonial extraction in Canada and their treatment within the historical record. From natural resources to Indigenous lands and knowledges, this course will deepen students’ understandings of the processes, industries and technologies responsible for settler colonial extraction in Canada.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

HIS336H5 • The Imperial Victorian World

HIS336H5 • The Imperial Victorian World

This course investigates the development of British politics and the emergence of its global empire from the early nineteenth century to 1900. It engages with key historical issues such as the development of representative government, imperialism, colonial relationships, the industrial revolution, and new political ideologies (i.e. conservativism, liberalism, socialism).

Recommended Preparation: HIS101H5 or HIS102H5 or HIS103H5 or HIS104H5 or HIS105H5 or HIS106H5 or HIS107H5 or HIS108H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

HIS355H5 • Histories of Extraction and the Future of the Environment

HIS355H5 • Histories of Extraction and the Future of the Environment

This course uses Indigenous, transnational and feminist frameworks to examine colonialism’s impact on the environment. From Turtle Island (Canada/U.S.) to Aotearoa (New Zealand), this course dismantles colonial histories, extractive industries and the state apparatuses that govern our relationship to the environment to form alternative understandings of environmental histories and futures.

Recommended Preparation: HIS255H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

HIS398H5 • South Asia in Motion: Circulation, Mobility, Histories

HIS398H5 • South Asia in Motion: Circulation, Mobility, Histories

This course examines how the movement of peoples, goods and ideas across land and sea has shaped South Asia’s history. In particular it analyses how far-reaching networks based on trade, pilgrimage, patronage, politics and labour that passed through the Indian Ocean, Bay of Bengal, and the Himalayas connected South Asia to Southeast Asia, and East Asia, amongst other spaces. It also foregrounds how these histories of mobility changed under colonial rule and its aftermath. The course focuses on the period from 1200 until the present.

Prerequisites: HIS282H5
Recommended Preparation: HIS382H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

HIS401H5 • Missionaries and Colonization in New France

HIS401H5 • Missionaries and Colonization in New France

The relationship between missionaries and colonization in New France was complicated and contested. This course will explore the links between missionary activities and colonial designs through late medieval and early modern European ideas of religion and expansion; early encounters between Indigenous peoples and Europeans; French attempts at settlement; cooperation and conflict between missionaries and the Crown; similarities and differences among different missionary groups; and Indigenous responses to missionary efforts.

Prerequisites: HIS101H5 or HIS102H5 or HIS103H5 or HIS104H5 or HIS105H5 or HIS106H5 or HIS107H5 or HIS108H5 and HIS230H5 or HIS261H5 or HIS262H5 or HIS263Y5.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

HIS453H5 • The Klondike Gold Rush

HIS453H5 • The Klondike Gold Rush

This course investigates the Klondike Gold Rush (Alaska-Yukon, 1896-1900) through the lenses of North American borderlands, environmental, and indigenous history. By viewing the gold rush in the context of growing national and imperial expansion, we will see it was an essential component of a much larger historical process centering on settlement, development, and dispossession.

Prerequisites: HIS101H5 or HIS102H5 or HIS103H5 or HIS104H5 or HIS105H5 or HIS106H5 or HIS107H5 or HIS108H5
Recommended Preparation: HIS262H5 or HIS263Y5 or HIS272H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

HIS480H5 • Partition and its Aftermath in South Asia

HIS480H5 • Partition and its Aftermath in South Asia

This course examines the everyday effects of the partition of 1947, and its aftermath, when British India gained independence and was also crafted into new nation states. Amongst other issues, it engages with sexual violence, nation-making, territoriality, rehabilitation, citizenship, and spatiality. More broadly it connects these issues to space, place and historical memory.

Prerequisites: HIS101H5 or HIS102H5 or HIS103H5 or HIS104H5 or HIS105H5 or HIS106H5 or HIS107H5 or HIS108H5 and HIS282H5.
Recommended Preparation: HIS382H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

ISP130H5 • Numeracy for University and Beyond

ISP130H5 • Numeracy for University and Beyond

This course teaches quantitative literacy and numeracy skills in order to develop core competencies identified as essential for university and beyond. ISP130H5 enhances students’ ability and confidence to engage with quantitative information in a variety of contexts, by applying mathematical, statistical, and computational approaches to make informed decisions, to problem-solve, to effectively communicate and express quantitative information, and to create logical, evidence-based arguments. Rather than focusing on math specific skills, the course explores relevant concepts as they appear in diverse disciplines and authentic real-life situations, such as numbers and magnitude, patterns and relationships, financial literacy, health, probabilistic reasoning, chance and risk, and interpreting data presented in various forms.

Total Instructional Hours: 36S

LTL381H5 • Methodologies for Teaching English as a Second Language

LTL381H5 • Methodologies for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides an overview of classroom teaching methods, techniques and strategies for English as a second language, as well as ways of creating and adapting materials to particular teaching contexts such as English-as-a-second-language (ESL) in Canada, English for Academic Purposes (EAP), English for Specific Purposes (ESP), English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) abroad, and blended teaching. Theoretical issues and classroom implications for teaching and learning with technology will be discussed. Classroom management techniques will also be examined, along with ways to access and work with classroom management and technology-related resources.

Prerequisites: (LIN101H5 and LIN102H5 and a minimum of 0.5 credit in LIN or LTL at the 200-level or higher) or (FRE280Y5 and FRE225Y5) or (ITA200Y5 and an additional 0.5 credit in ITA at the 200-level or higher)
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

LTL382H5 • Teaching Second Language Speaking and Listening

LTL382H5 • Teaching Second Language Speaking and Listening

This course examines theories and practices related to the teaching and learning of speaking and listening in a second language, particularly with reference to English. The course will focus on the theoretical and research-based underpinnings of second language speaking and listening on the ways in which instruction can facilitate the development of these skills. The relationship of pronunciation to listening and listening skills will be explored, and an overview of teaching pronunciation to second language learners will be provided (particularly with reference to English).

Prerequisites: (LIN101H5 and LIN102H5 and a minimum of 0.5 credit in LIN or LTL at the 200-level or higher) or (FRE280Y5 and FRE225Y5) or (ITA200Y5 and an additional 0.5 credit in ITA at the 200-level or higher)
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

LTL383H5 • Teaching Second Language Reading and Writing

LTL383H5 • Teaching Second Language Reading and Writing

This course examines theories and practices related to the teaching and learning of reading and writing in a second language, particularly with reference to English. The course will focus on the theoretical and research-based underpinnings of second language reading and writing and on the ways in which instruction can facilitate the development of these skills. The relationship of vocabulary to second language reading and writing will be examined (particularly with reference to English).

Prerequisites: (LIN101H5 and LIN102H5 and a minimum of 0.5 credit in LIN or LTL at the 200-level or higher) or (FRE280Y5 and FRE225Y5) or (ITA200Y5 and an additional 0.5 credit in ITA at the 200-level or higher)
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

LTL495Y5 • Individual Project

LTL495Y5 • Individual Project

A research or reading project undertaken by the student under the supervision of a faculty member. Written work to be completed in French/Italian for credit towards an LTL program in French or Italian.

Prerequisites: 0.5 credit at the 300 or 400 level in LTL
Distribution Requirement: Humanities

LTL496H5 • Individual Project

LTL496H5 • Individual Project

A research or reading project undertaken by the student under the supervision of a faculty member. Written work to be completed in French/Italian for credit towards an LTL program in French or Italian.

Prerequisites: 0.5 credit at the 300- or 400-level in LTL
Distribution Requirement: Humanities

MAT305H5 • Elementary Lie Theory

MAT305H5 • Elementary Lie Theory

This course is an introduction to the theory of matrix groups with a particular emphasis on applications and examples. This course will cover orthogonal transformations in two and three dimensions, quaternions, isometries of Euclidean space, Lie algebras and matrix exponentials.

Prerequisites: [(MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT232H5] or MAT257Y5
Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T

MAT307H5 • Curves and Surfaces

MAT307H5 • Curves and Surfaces

This course is an introduction to the theory of curves and surfaces with a particular emphasis on applications and computational techniques. This course will cover curves in R2 and R3, curvature, torsion, differential of maps, First Fundamental Form, Parallel transport, Bishop Frames, Geodesics, Gauss-Bonnet Theorem, and Gaussian curvature.


Prerequisites: [(MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT232H5] or MAT257Y5
Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T

MGT150H5 • Financial Planning for Individuals

MGT150H5 • Financial Planning for Individuals

This course will cover personal finance topics for individuals at all stages of life. Topics include budgeting, borrowing, investing, insurance and retirement planning. Tax issues associated with these topics is also covered including the basics of personal income tax. Case studies are used extensively to illustrate the material.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

MGT301H5 • Coding and Data Management for Business Analytics (Accelerated)

MGT301H5 • Coding and Data Management for Business Analytics (Accelerated)

Targeted to business students with some programming experience, the course provides the foundation to take more advanced courses in the Department of Management that requires programming and database knowledge. Topics in this accelerated course will include data structures, algorithms, analytics (i.e. descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive) and structured query language. Students will be expected to integrate concepts from statistics as well.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P

MGT324H5 • Financial Report Analysis and Valuation

MGT324H5 • Financial Report Analysis and Valuation

This course will provide a framework for analyzing a firm’s past performance, estimating its future performance, and valuing its equity. You will understand how to interpret financial statements, analyze cash flows, make judgments about earnings quality and uncover hidden assets and liabilities. It helps you become a sophisticated user of financial accounting data.

Prerequisites: MGT220H5 and MGT223H5
Exclusions: MGM320H5
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

MGT442H5 • Financial Distress and Insolvency

MGT442H5 • Financial Distress and Insolvency

Traditional business courses often deal with financially healthy firms. However, failure is an inevitable reality for many businesses. The problems currently being witnessed by the retail sector are a case in point. According to official Canadian government statistics, 3580 businesses filed for insolvency in 2018 alone, with more than a quarter of these businesses being from Ontario. This course aims to study the reasons why some firms find themselves in financial distress, alternative courses of action (including legal options) in response to financial distress, and the role of various stakeholders in the process.

Prerequisites: MGT231H5 and 0.5 credit in MGT/MGM at the 300/400 level
Exclusions: MGT411H5 Special Topics in Management: Financial Distress and Insolvency (Fall 2018 and Fall 2019)
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

MGT443H5 • Topics in Asset Pricing

MGT443H5 • Topics in Asset Pricing

This course represents a hands-on introduction to tools and techniques required to implement asset pricing and risk-management models in practice. The course will enable students to build computer algorithms tailored to financial problems. Emphasis is placed on portfolio optimization techniques, factor models for security pricing, risk quantification and management, option pricing, and the management of large high-frequency trading data sets.


Prerequisites: ECO220Y5 or STA256H5
Exclusions: MGT412H5 Special Topics in Management: Computational Finance (Winter 2020 & Winter 2021)
Recommended Preparation: STA258H5 and MGT201H5 and MGT330H5
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

MGT444H5 • FinTech Innovation

MGT444H5 • FinTech Innovation

Over just the last few years, entrepreneurs in Canada and the rest of the world have founded hundreds of start-up firms that promise to change the financial industry fundamentally. Fueled by technological innovations, these so-called FinTech firms develop products and services that promise not only great costs savings and efficiency gains, but that also threaten to eliminate century-old functions of traditional banks by digitizing and automating products and operations. And more than that, many of the technological developments allow new forms of customer-to-business interactions, new financial products, and new ways to analyze data. The course has two main objectives. First, it will introduce students to the emerging field of FinTech. We focus on two main technological innovations, blockchain technology and machine learning (which relates to artificial intelligence), that facilitate this transformation and that these FinTechs use. We will study the process of founding and financing of a FinTech startup. The second objective is to give students the opportunity to develop a viable FinTech product idea, based on a thorough analysis of the business models of two to three successful FinTech firms.

Exclusions: MGT415H5 Special Topics in Management: FinTech (Fall 2017, Fall 2018 & Fall 2020)
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

PHL237H5 • Introduction to East Asian Philosophy

PHL237H5 • Introduction to East Asian Philosophy

An introduction to the main systems of East Asian philosophy, including Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Shintoism, and Neo-Confucianism; the challenge of Western thought; the development of modern East Asian Philosophy.

Prerequisites: PHL101H5 or PHL102H5 or PHL103H5 or PHL113H5 or 4.0 credits
Exclusions: EAS241H1 and PHL237H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

PHL238H5 • Introduction to South Asian Philosophy

PHL238H5 • Introduction to South Asian Philosophy

An introduction to the main philosophical traditions of South Asia, focusing on their historical development and treatment of topics such as devotion, duty, ethics, consciousness, selfhood, suffering, meditation, enlightenment, knowledge, and reality. Readings may include the early Rig Veda, the Upanishads, early Buddhist thought, Jainism, Samkhya-Yoga Philosophy, and Classical Vedanta, among others.

Prerequisites: PHL101H5 or PHL102H5 or PHL103H5 or PHL113H5 or 4.0 credits
Exclusions: PHL390H5 (Winter 2020) and PHL293H5 (Fall 2020)
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

POL405Y5 • Political Science Internship

POL405Y5 • Political Science Internship

Through a part-time, unpaid internship (150 hours), students apply the knowledge and skills gained through previous coursework in political science. Participants will develop skill sets through a professional setting combined with class meetings that include workshops, writing, oral presentations, reading and reflection. Placements are made in both the public and private sectors, such as local or regional government offices, law firms, civil society organizations or non-profit agencies.

Normally, the 150 hours will be completed by attending the work placement one full day each week from September to April. Students must confirm internship arrangements well in advance and secure departmental approval for their internship position prior to the start of term. Students will be admitted to through an online application.


Prerequisites: 6.0 credits in POL including POL200Y5 and [(POL209H5 and POL208H5) or POL208Y5] and [(POL215H5 and POL216H5) or POL 214Y5) and POL218Y5 and POL320Y5 and 1.0 POL credit at the 300 level
Exclusions: Other department's internship courses, including HIS498Y5 or ECO400Y5 or SOC480Y5 or JEG401Y5
Enrolment Limits: Enrolment is limited to Political Science Specialists, Joint Specialists and Political Science Majors
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 150P/18S

PSY314H5 • Educational Psychology: The Science of Learning

PSY314H5 • Educational Psychology: The Science of Learning

In this class we will review key findings from cognitive development, cognitive psychology, and educational psychology that have implications for the development of learning experience inside and outside the classroom.


Prerequisites: PSY201H5 and PSY210H5 and PSY270H5
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

RLG423H5 • Ritual and Material Practice in South Asian Islam

RLG423H5 • Ritual and Material Practice in South Asian Islam

In this course we examine the intersection of material practices and senses in South Asian Islamic rituals in how religious worlds are experienced. The course also focuses on the role of ritual and material culture in shaping South Asian Muslim identities (Sunni, Shiʿi, Sufi).

Prerequisites: RLG205H5 or RLG303H5 and 1.5 RLG credits
Recommended Preparation: RLG204H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

RLG448H5 • Approaches to the Academic Study of Islam

RLG448H5 • Approaches to the Academic Study of Islam

This seminar introduces advanced undergraduate students to the history, genealogies, theories, and methods that have shaped the academic study of Islam and Muslims in the discipline of religious studies.

Prerequisites: RLG204H5 or RLG303H5 and 1.5 RLG credits
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

SOC339H5 • The Indian Act: Canadian Law, Sovereignty and Indigenous Womxn

SOC339H5 • The Indian Act: Canadian Law, Sovereignty and Indigenous Womxn

In discussions about Indigenous Peoples and law, the Indian Act is one of the most cited pieces of Canadian legislation. From explaining the history of residential schooling to violence against Indigenous womxn, critical and Indigenous scholars turn to the Indian Act as a key source and problem space. We will center the work of Indigenous feminist scholarship to understand why scholars argue that the act is still both required and a site of contestation, violence, and genocide, and how we are each affected by its governance.

Prerequisites: 1.0 SSC credit
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

SOC353H5 • Borders and Human Rights

SOC353H5 • Borders and Human Rights

This course focuses on the legal construction of international borders, with an emphasis on human rights. The course investigates a range of issues, including but not limited to, the 1951 Refugee Convention and refugee movements, the limits of citizenship rights, and the merging of criminal justice and migration enforcement, including the use of detention as a migration management tool.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

SPA420H5 • Advanced Topics on Spanish Grammar

SPA420H5 • Advanced Topics on Spanish Grammar

Study of traditional topics of Spanish grammar from a linguistic perspective with the goal of improving students’ knowledge and usage of Spanish grammar and language understanding in general. Topics include (but are not limited to): word order variation patterns, subject types, the verbal system, and the Spanish copulas. This course employs a cross-linguistic approach, as some of these topics are discussed from a comparative perspective. This course is taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SPA219Y5 or SPA320Y5 or as indicated by Spanish Language Assessment.
Exclusions: SPA420H1 and SPA421H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L

STA246H5 • Computational Probability and Statistics

STA246H5 • Computational Probability and Statistics

This course covers probability including its role in statistical and computational modeling. Topics include classical and computational perspectives on cumulative, mass and distribution functions, random variables, expectation, limiting results, the normal distribution. Computational topics include generating and sampling random numbers, combinatorial objects and probability functions for simulation and statistical analysis. Additional techniques include resampling, hypothesis testing, model fit and cross validation.

Prerequisites: CSC148H5 and (MAT134H5 or MAT136H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5 or 65%+ in MAT133Y5)
Exclusions: STA256H5 or STA237H1 or STA247H1 or STA257H1 or ECO227Y5 or STAB52H3
Recommended Preparation: MAT232H5 or MAT233H5
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T

WGS211H5 • Gender, Technology and the Body

WGS211H5 • Gender, Technology and the Body

This course engages with feminist theories of embodiment to explore the body’s intersections with gender and technology. Drawing on the interdisciplinary fields of feminist studies, science and technology studies and disability studies, it explores a range of technological and scientific policies and processes that shape and affect bodies in transnational contexts.

Recommended Preparation: WGS101H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T

WGS325H5 • Sustainability: Society and Feminist Praxis

WGS325H5 • Sustainability: Society and Feminist Praxis

Sustainability considers humanity’s relationship to the environment. It reflects on a feminist politic of care and the specific ways people are affected along lines of race, gender, class, sexuality and citizenship. It explores how feminist scholarship seeks to direct policy change and respond to ecological and climatic crises.

Recommended Preparation: WGS101H5 or WGS200Y5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

WGS341H5 • Black Queer Cinema and Visual Culture

WGS341H5 • Black Queer Cinema and Visual Culture

This course introduces students to LGBTIQ themed films and visual culture from Africa and the diaspora. It analyzes gender and sexuality from the perspective of black/African filmmakers, visual artists, and theorists.

Prerequisites: WGS200Y5 or WGS205H5
Recommended Preparation: WGS336H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P

WGS369H5 • Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

WGS369H5 • Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (S.T.E.M.) analyzes how society, culture, education, and intersectional power relationships shape women’s lives and their career choices and studies the underlying gendered issues in these professions.

Recommended Preparation: WGS101H5 or WGS200Y5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

WGS375H5 • The Aesthetics of Sexuality

WGS375H5 • The Aesthetics of Sexuality

What is the relationship between aesthetic form and sexuality? Drawing on theories and methods from feminist and sexuality studies, this course engages this question to understand the emergence of queer aesthetics as a response to social and political crisis, whilst comprehending how LGBTIQ+ artists create livable worlds by imagining otherwise.

Prerequisites: WGS200Y5 or WGS205H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P

WGS415H5 • Black Feminist Performance in Popular Culture and Everyday Life

WGS415H5 • Black Feminist Performance in Popular Culture and Everyday Life

This course provides students with an understanding of how Black Feminist Performance is read, interpreted and experienced in popular culture and everyday life. The course focuses on texts and cultural work produced by feminist scholars, critics and artists who engage with race, gender and sexuality across multiple sites.

Prerequisites: WGS200Y5 and 1.0 WGS credit at the 300/400 level
Exclusions: WGS434H5 (Winter 2020)
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

WGS425H5 • Decolonial Feminist Archival Practices

WGS425H5 • Decolonial Feminist Archival Practices

This course challenges the notion of the archives as institutions and repositories of historical truths. It develops students’ archival analytical skills using critical feminist intersectional, decolonial, diasporic, and queer approaches. Students learn to reimagine and rethink archival spaces.

Prerequisites: WGS200Y5 and 1.0 WGS credit at the 300/400 level
Recommended Preparation: WGS372H5
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S

WRI306H5 • Writing for the Academic

WRI306H5 • Writing for the Academic

Examines conventions and standard practices when scientists write for other scientists in academic science journals, in conference and poster presentations, and in grant applications. This course focuses on presenting primary and secondary research. Humanities and social science students will gain specialized skills in technical writing and editing. Science students will learn the writing practices expected in professional labs and research groups. Students will present an article-length paper presenting primary research findings and a conference poster presenting the same findings to a scientific audience.

Prerequisites: WRI173H5 or approval from the PWC program director.
Exclusions: WRI490H5
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L

WRI470H5 • Writing Futures

WRI470H5 • Writing Futures

This course examines speculative non-fiction and explores ways writers communicate about research, projections, and plans for humanity’s future. Students will consider how writing and other cultural forms act not only as “products” of science and reportage but as tools of knowledge-making. Students will produce portfolios that respond to and add to the literature of speculative non-fiction.

Prerequisites: 3.0 WRI credits and permission of instructor
Exclusions: WRI490H5
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L