Sociology


Faculty List

Professors Emeriti
M. Blute, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
D. Brownfield, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
D.F. Campbell, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
H. Friedmann, A.B., M.A., Ph.D.
B. Green, B.A., Ph.D.
J.B. Kervin, B.A., Ph.D.
E. Silva, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
J.H. Simpson, B.A., B.D., Th.M., Ph.D.
M.W. Spencer, A.B., M.A., Ph.D.X

Professors
J. Adese, B.A., B.A. (Hons), M.A., Ph.D.
Z. Baber, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
J. Baker, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
E. Berrey, A.B., Ph.D.
T. Bryan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
H.Y. Choo, B.A., M.S., Ph.D.
C. Cranford, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
L. Farah Schwartzman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
J. Flores, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
P. Goodman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
R. Gray, B.A.S., M.A., Ph.D.
J. Haag, B.A. (Hons)., M.A.
S. Hoffman, B.A., Ph.D.
N. Innocente, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
J. Johnston, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
A. Korteweg, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
S. Liu, LL.B., M.A., Ph.D.
N. Maghbouleh, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
P. Maurutto, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
A. Miles, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
M. Milkie, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
A. Owusu-Bempah, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
D. Pettinicchio, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
K. Plys, B.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.
Z. Richer, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
L. Richter, B.A., M.A., Ph.D
E. Schneiderhan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Y. Sherwood, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
C. Sibblis, B.A., B.S.W., M.S.W.
C. Smith, B.A., Ph.D.
G. Super, B.A., LL.B.,M.Sc. PhD.
W. Zhang, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.

Chair
P. Goodman
Maanjiwe nendamowinan, Room 6230
905-828-5395
p.goodman@utoronto.ca

Associate Chair, Undergraduate
J.Baker
Maanjiwe nendamowinan, Room 6268
jayne.baker@utoronto.ca

Academic Counsellor
Ania Joly
Maanjiwe nendamowinan, Room 6252
905-569-4288
socadvisor.utm@utoronto.ca

 

Sociologists study how families work; how individuals change over the life course; how norms and laws are made, broken, enforced, and changed; how inequalities of gender, class, and race emerge, continue, and change; how cities, regions, nations, and international institutions work as organized sets of relationships; how power is exercised and resisted; how individuals, groups, and organizations communicate or fail to communicate; how cultural meanings relate to patterned social relationships; and more. Sociology thus creates theories about a broad range of human activity. Sociologists study these questions in two complementary ways. First, they gather data about large numbers of individuals to discover patterns of behaviour and interpret them through statistical analysis. Second, they gather in-depth data by interviewing and observing individuals and groups, and interpret these data through qualitative methods.

The Department offers Specialist, Major, and Minor programs in Sociology, and Specialist and Major programs in Criminology, Law and Society.

Students may select from a variety of special areas of interest in their Specialist or Major programs. They may also consult with the department for other combinations of courses such as those emphasizing Canadian society, interpersonal relations, or research methods.

A degree in Sociology leads to careers in social policy, government, education, health, public opinion research, community and social services, non-governmental, cooperative, business and non-profit organizations, criminology and corrections, industrial and labour relations, evaluation research, and environment.

Students should also review the Degree Requirements section prior to selecting courses

Program websitehttps://www.utm.utoronto.ca/sociology

Sociology Programs

Sociology - Specialist (Arts)

Sociology - Specialist (Arts)

Enrolment Requirements:

Limited Enrolment � Space in the Specialist Program in Sociology is limited. To be considered for enrolment, students must meet the following minimum criteria. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

For students applying in 2022-2023 for program entry in the 2023-2024 Academic Year

  1. Registration Status: Current enrolment in the Sociology Major program.
  2. Credits: A minimum of 8.0 credits.
  3. Prerequisite Courses:�SOC100H5�and�SOC221H5�and�SOC222H5�and�SOC231H5�with a minimum average of 73% across all courses.
  4. Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA): The Department of Sociology determines the minimum CGPA annually in relation to the number of applicants. It is never below 2.00.

For students applying in 2023-2024 (and beyond) for program entry in the 2024-2025 Academic Year (and beyond):

  1. Registration Status: Current enrolment in the Sociology Major program.
  2. Credits: A minimum of 8.0 credits.
  3. Prerequisite Courses:�SOC100H5�and�SOC221H5�and�SOC222H5�and�SOC231H5�and ISP100H5 with a minimum average of 73% across all courses.
  4. Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA): The Department of Sociology determines the minimum CGPA annually in relation to the number of applicants. It is never below 2.00.

Completion Requirements:

10.0-10.5 credits are required.

First Year:

Higher Years:



Note:

Students are not permitted to take any of the following courses elsewhere:

    1. SOC100H5
    2. SOC109H5
    3. SOC205H5
    4. SOC221H5
    5. SOC222H5
    6. SOC231H5
    7. SOC350H5
    8. SOC387H5
    9. SOC440Y5

If any of the above credits are completed outside of UTM, students will be required to complete the UTM version of the course and it will be designated as an EXT course. Special consideration may be given to new students assessed for transfer credit at UTM.


ERSPE1013

Sociology - Major (Arts)

Sociology - Major (Arts)

Enrolment Requirements:

Limited Enrolment: Space in the Major program in Sociology is limited. To be considered for enrolment, students must meet the following minimum criteria. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

For students applying in 2022-2023 for program entry in the 2023-2024 Academic Year:

  1. Credits: A minimum of 4.0 credits.
  2. Prerequisite Course(s):Students must have a final mark of at least 67% in SOC100H5 OR a final mark of at least 70% in each of two 0.5 credit SOC courses at the 200 level or above.
  3. Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA): The Department of Sociology determines the minimum CGPA annually in relation to the number of applicants. It is never below 2.00.

For students applying in 2023-2024 (and beyond) for program entry in the 2024-2025 Academic Year (and beyond):

  1. Credits: A minimum of 4.0 credits.
  2. Prerequisite Course(s):Students must have a final mark of at least 67% in SOC100H5 OR a final mark of at least 70% in each of two 0.5 credit SOC courses at the 200 level or above.
  3. ISP100H5
  4. Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA): The Department of Sociology determines the minimum CGPA annually in relation to the number of applicants. It is never below 2.00.

Completion Requirements:

7.0-7.5 credits are required.

First Year:

Higher Years:

  • SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and SOC231H5
  • 1.0 credit of SOC at the 300 level
  • 1.0 credit of SOC at the 400 level
  • 1.0 credit of SOC at the 300/400 level
  • 2.0 credits of SOC


Note:

Students are not permitted to take any of the following courses elsewhere:

    1. SOC100H5
    2. SOC109H5
    3. SOC205H5
    4. SOC221H5
    5. SOC222H5
    6. SOC231H5
    7. SOC350H5
    8. SOC387H5
    9. SOC440Y5

If any of the above credits are completed outside of UTM, students will be required to complete the UTM version of the course and it will be designated as an EXT course. Special consideration may be given to new students assessed for transfer credit at UTM.


ERMAJ1013

Sociology - Minor (Arts)

Sociology - Minor (Arts)

Enrolment Requirements:

Limited Enrolment: — Admission is based on the following criteria:

  1. Credits: Students must have a minimum of 4.0 credits.

  2. Prerequisite Course(s): Students must have a minimum final mark of 65% in SOC100H5, OR a final mark of 67% in each of two 0.5 credit SOC courses at the 200 level or above.

  3. Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA): The Department of Sociology determines the CGPA requirement each admission period in relation to the number of applicants and it is never below 2.00.

Note: Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

Completion Requirements:

4.0 credits in Sociology are required.

Year 1

Year 2

  • 2.5 SOC credits at the 200 level

Year 3

  • 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level

Note:

Students are not permitted to take any of the following courses elsewhere:

    1. SOC100H5
    2. SOC109H5

If any of the above credits are completed outside of UTM, students will be required to complete the UTM version of the course and it will be designated as an EXT course. Special consideration may be given to new students assessed for transfer credit at UTM.


ERMIN1013

Sociology Courses

SOC100H5 • Introduction to Sociology

An introduction to the conceptual and empirical foundations of the discipline intended on providing a foundation for subsequent Sociology and Criminology, Law and Society courses and programs. Students will learn the sociological approach of theory and inquiry to a range of topics.

Exclusions: SOC100H1 or SOC101Y1 or SOC102H1 or SOC103H1 or SOCA01H3 or SOCA02H3 or SOCA03Y3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC109H5 • Introduction to Criminology, Law & Society

This course provides an introduction to the overlapping areas of “criminology” and “law and society” within the Criminology, Law & Society (CLS) stream. The goal of the course is to provide a sociological foundation for subsequent CLS courses. In addition to a criminological/socio-legal introduction to theory and methods, topics may include law, inequality, intersectionality, legal institutions, legal professions, crime, criminal justice, and punishment.


Note: This course is required for Criminology, Law and Society Major and Specialist programs.

Exclusions: SOC209H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC202H5 • Cultural Sociology

This course introduces students to the field of cultural sociology, which seeks to understand how ideas, meanings, values and beliefs are created, and how they are also implicated in foundational sociological issues such as inequality, identity, social change, and social organization. These linkages are examined through topics such as popular culture, the mass media, science, religion, art, language, knowledge, public opinion, food, advertising and consumerism.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5
Exclusions: SOC280H1 or SOCB58H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC205H5 • Theories in Criminology

This course will cover major theoretical paradigms in the field of criminology included, among others, classical, positivist, strain, control, social learning, critical, feminist, postmodern and critical race theories. Students are required to take this course upon entry to the Criminology, Law and Society Major and Specialist programs.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC206H5 • Introduction to the Sociology of Genocide

This lecture course will lead students through an in-depth consideration of why genocides occur.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC208H5 • Crime and Organizations

An analysis of the intersection between crime and organizations. This course introduces students to various organizational theories and examines crime by organizations, crime within organizations, and crime that is "organized."

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC210H5 • Canadian Criminal Justice

This course provides an introduction to sociological and criminological analyses of crime, law, and the operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, with emphasis on how law and criminal justice are shaped by social, political and economic considerations. It will also consider how social identities such as race, class and gender influence individuals' perceptions of, and experiences in, the Canadian criminal justice system.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and SOC109H5
Exclusions: CRI205H1 or CRI210H1 or SOC209H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC211H5 • Law and Social Control

This course investigates the role of law in shaping social norms and regulating behavior.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5)
Exclusions: SOC212H1 or SOCB50H3 or SOCB51H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC216H5 • Sociology of Law

Major theoretical and substantive debates in the sociology of law. How race, gender and social inequality shape legal institutions, the law and the broader social context.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5)
Exclusions: CRI215H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC219H5 • Gender and Crime

This course explores how masculinity and femininity shape and are shaped by offending, violence, and victimization. Possible topics may include the gender gap in crime, intersectionality, gender diversity, victimless crimes, survival crimes, gender-based violence, and missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5)
Exclusions: CRI380H1 or SOC365H5 Special Topics in Criminology: Gender, Violence and Offending (Fall 2019 and Winter 2020)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC221H5 • The Logic of Social Inquiry

Logic of Social Inquiry compares the logic of quantitative and qualitative research. Key topics include the relationship between theory and research, conceptualization and measurement of sociological concepts and sampling strategies in the quantitative and qualitative traditions. Students are introduced to a range of data collection methods. Students are required to take this course upon entry to the Sociology and Criminology, Law and Society Major and Specialist programs.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5
Exclusions: SOC200H1 or SOCB05H3 or SOC150H1 or SOC204H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC222H5 • Measuring the Social World

This course addresses how we are able to measure social concepts such as social characteristics, social attitudes, and social actions. Descriptive statistics and their presentation in tables and graphs will be presented in some detail. A very basic introduction to inferential statistics and sampling will also be presented. Students are required to take this course upon entry to the Sociology and Criminology, Law and Society Major and Specialist programs.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5
Exclusions: SOC202H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC224H5 • Sociology of Education

This course examines what some of our key sociological thinkers have said about the role of education in society, from socialization to sorting students into different opportunities, including along the lines of race, class and gender. The course also covers the development of the education system in Canada, the career of teaching, curriculum development, and standardized testing. Students will have the opportunity to apply sociological insights to contemporary issues in education.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5
Exclusions: SOCB26H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC227H5 • Sociology of Work and Occupations

This course covers work and post-industrialization in Canada today. It considers labour force participation, and social differences and inequalities across different groups, including gender, class, and ethnicity/race. It also examines managerial cultures and styles, and workers' responses and resistance to managerial control.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5
Exclusions: SOC207H1 or SOCB54H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC228H5 • Introduction to Indigenous Studies

This survey course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Indigenous Studies. Students will explore the themes, theories and methods of the discipline,and develop a foundational knowledge about Indigenous history, peoples, cultures and societies in Canada.

Prerequisites: 0.5 SSC credit

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC230H5 • Thinking Like a Sociologist

This course builds on SOC100H5 through a deep engagement with 4-5 significant new publications in Sociology, typically books by department faculty and visiting scholars. By developing reading and writing skills through a variety of assignments, including reflections, and experiential learning in classroom debates and simulations with the researchers who produced the publications, students will learn to "think like a sociologist". Possible topics covered include race/ethnicity, gender, work, immigration, political sociology, cultural sociology, and criminology, as well as other major subfields within the discipline.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC231H5 • Classical Sociological Theory

This course presents a discussion and analysis of classical sociological theory including such luminaries as Marx, Durkheim, Weber and Dubois among others. Students are required to take this course upon entry to the Sociology Major and Specialist programs and the Criminology, Law and Society Specialist program.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5
Exclusions: SOC201H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC236H5 • Globalization

How do individuals relate to the complex and over-used concept of "globalization"? This course will explore major theories and controversies in the field of globalization scholarship, looking at the phenomena from the perspective of global capitalists, anti-globalization social movements, consumers, states, and citizens. Students will critically evaluate common claims made about globalization, and acquire tools to assess the validity of competing perspectives.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC239H5 • Sociology of Health and Illness

This course examines the social causes of illness and disease, the sociology of illness experience, and the sociology of risks to health. The course addresses only peripherally issues related to formal health care provision, health care work, and the structure of health care systems.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5
Exclusions: SOC243H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC240H5 • Introduction to Social Policy

This course will examine how human needs are met by states. It focuses on the sociological, political and economic forces that help create new policies and reshape existing social policies. The course will provide a survey of welfare state policies, economic policies and family policies. It will also focus on the outcomes of social policy as these affect various constituencies and social groups such as the economically underprivileged and disadvantaged, racial and ethnic minority groups, and people with disabilities.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC244H5 • Sociology of Families

The development and variation in contemporary families will be presented. Topics may include cross-cultural comparisons, the impact of legal, economic and political factors as well as change in the meaning of the term "family".

Prerequisites: SOC100H5
Exclusions: SOC214H1 or SOCB49H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC253H5 • Social History of Race and Ethnicity

This course examines how ideas about "race" and "ethnicity" evolved and became institutionalized on a global scale, as well as systems of exploitation, exclusion and inequality that have given rise to today's patterns of racial and ethnic inequality in the world. We focus on examples from different regions of the world, as well as examine large-scale historical events such as colonialism, slavery and immigration.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC263H5 • Social Inequality

Examines the causes, prevalence and manifestations of social, political and economic inequalities, internationally and within Canada. The effects of gender, age, ethnicity-race, among other characteristics, are carefully analyzed in Canada and cross-culturally.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5
Exclusions: SOC363H5 or SOC220H1 or SOCB47H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC275H5 • Sociology of Gender

This course introduces students to the sociology of gender showing how gender is a relationship of power that structures our everyday lives from intimate relationships through global political and economic forces. We will focus on gender and gender differences as produced in historically and locally specific ways where gender differences intersect with those of race, ethnicity, class, religion, sexuality and other structures of inequality.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5
Exclusions: SOC265H1 or SOCB22H3 or SOCC24H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC299H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for SOC299H5 course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and 2nd Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may not take SOC299H5 and SOC299Y5 concurrently.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for SOC299Y5 course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and 2nd Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may not take SOC299H5 and SOC299Y5 concurrently.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC301H5 • Canadian Prisons

This course will examine trends and approaches within the correctional system in Canada. It will explore the historical and contemporary context of correctional practices. Attention will be paid to the differential impact of Canadian corrections on Aboriginal people and other minority groups.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC302H5 • Indigenous-Canada Relations

This course analyzes Indigenous-Canada relations. Topics may include nationhood, diplomatic relations, trade, military relationships, assimilation/civilization policy, land claims, self-government, and/or education.

Prerequisites: 1.0 SSC credit
Exclusions: SOC345H5 (Fall 2018)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC303H5 • White-collar and Corporate Crime

This course explores the individual, organizational, and ecological dimensions of white-collar and corporate crime. Topics generally include financial and environmental crime, workplace safety, and organizational deviance. As well, the social, political, and criminal justice responses to these crimes will be examined.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC304H5 • Environmental Sociology

This course focuses on human-nature interactions, and the social processes that modify and threaten the natural world.Students develop a better understanding of environmental issues, the interrelationship between social problems and environmental problems, as well as the ways that humans themselves are part of nature.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and 1.0 SSC credit at the 200-level
Exclusions: SOC336H5S Special Topics in Sociology:Environmental Sociology (Winter 2020)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC305H5 • Asian Canada and Asian Diaspora

The course will introduce students to the core and cutting-edge sociological and interdisciplinary scholarship on Asian Canada and Asian diaspora from transnational perspectives. We will examine the history of Asian migration to North America on the context of colonialism, the Cold War, and capitalist development, as well as the experiences of various Asian immigrant communities in the contemporary era.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Recommended Preparation: 200-level course on race and ethnicity

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC306H5 • Education and Social Control

This course explores the intersections of education and social control. In particular, we focus on moments when social control is evident in schooling, including how that control is used on some populations more than others. Topics include zero-tolerance policies, police/security presence in schools, education programming in prison, and the school-to-prison pipeline.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Recommended Preparation: SOC224H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC308H5 • Law and Crime in Asia and Asian Diasporas

This course introduces students to the core and cutting-edge sociological and interdisciplinary scholarship on law and crime in Asia and Asian diasporas across the world. It examines major topics in criminology, law and society in various Asian contexts (e.g., legal consciousness, legal pluralism, dispute resolution, policing, rights mobilization, etc.), as well as the experiences of Asian immigrant communities with legal and criminal justice systems. 

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC309H5 • Sociology of Mass Communication

This course examines the theories, methods, and findings of sociological studies of media production, content, and reception. The focus is on understanding how communication theories are adjudicated by empirical findings. Topics include race and gender in the media, bias in the news, media ownership, the film industry, and the role of the media in politics.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC310H5 • Youth Justice

The youth criminal justice system in Canada. Topics include historical and contemporary shifts in the youth justice system, young offender legislation, public perceptions and media representations of juvenile delinquency, current research and theories on youth crime and crime prevention strategies. Particular attention is paid to the treatment of specific groups.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: CRI370H1 or SOC310H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC311H5 • Special Topics in Law

This course will provide an in-depth exploration of a specific topic in law. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC312H5 • Law, Race and Racism

The course investigates the relationship between law, race, and racism and the societal implications. Students will gain a stronger understanding of how law creates race for the purposes of legitimating and perpetuating racism and the ways that law can, under some conditions, generate social change that reduces racial inequality.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC311H5S Special Topics in Law: Law, Race and Racism (Winter 2020)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC316H5 • Crime Prevention and Security

The growth of political, economic, community and academic interest in crime prevention and security. How segments of society or particular physical sites are constructed as security risks in need of regulation. The regulation of security, including crime prevention, community safety, risk reduction and surveillance. These issues are then examined in relation to specific empirical developments such as private policing, restorative justice, community policing and gated communities.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC317H5 • Shopping and Society

This course provides an overview of the Sociology of Consumption. The study of consumption provides an entry point for examining the intersection between culture, economics, and the environment. Potential topics include the following: the shopping experience, consumption as status, the environmental impact of consumerism, fashion cycles, and identity construction through consumption.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 200 level.
Recommended Preparation: SOC202H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC318H5 • Sociology of Mental Health and Mental Disorders

An overview of the link between social inequality and inequality in distress, focusing on differences in mental health across social groups and the role of stress and coping resources in explaining group differences.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC363H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC320H5 • Criminal Justice Organizations

This course uses organizational theory to examine major criminal justice institutions--including police, courts, and prisons. It examines the role of organizational goals, structure, resources, legitimacy, culture, and front-line workers in shaping organization-level decisions about policy and practice. It also examines the interactions, mutual influence, and competition between government, interest groups, and criminal justice institutions that help to initiate and sustain field-wide change.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC300H5 Special Topics in Criminology: Criminal Justice Organizations (Fall 2016, Winter 2017)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC321H5 • Law & Rights

This course investigates the promise and limitations of rights as a legal framework to safeguard citizens and residents of Canada and abroad. Topics include the framing and implementation of novel rights claims, the relationship between formal rights and social norms, and the impact of rights frameworks on civic and community ties.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC322H5 • Criminal Justice and Inequality

This course examines the intersections between social inequality and the criminal justice system in Canada and internationally. The course will explore the impact of practices and policies on race, class, gender and other forms of social inequality.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC323H5 • Law, Culture and Social Problems

This course explores contemporary social problems related to law with an emphasis on cultural dynamics such as perception, group and community culture, stereotyping, and meaning-making. Topics covered may include law in everyday life, gun carrying by gun owners, workplace discrimination lawsuits, the #MeToo movement, and the Canadian government’s marginalization of Indigenous legal orders.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC324H5 • Carceral Feminisms: Race, Gender and State Violence

This course explores how different strains of feminism shape practices of punishment. Course topics may include: intersectional debates in the regulation of domestic violence, gender-responsive policing, state regulation of gender-based violence, and prison abolition theory and praxis.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC447H5S (Winter 2019)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC325H5 • Law and Social Theory

This course examines the writings on law-related topics in classical and contemporary social theories. At the intersection between socio-legal studies and sociological theory, the course traces how different generations of social theorists approach law, from classical theorists such as Montesquieu, Tocqueville, Marx, Durkheim, and Weber to contemporary socio-legal theorists across the world.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC326H5 • Policing

This course will examine the nature of policing, its structure and function. Attention is given to the theoretical analyses of policing, the history of policing and to its public and private forms. The course will focus on the objectives and domain, as well as the strategies, powers, and authority of contemporary policing; including decision-making, wrong-doing, accountability, and the decentralization of policing.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: CRI335H1 or SOCC11H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC327H5 • Drugs and the Modern World

The course examines how "drugs", as well as attempts to police and control their use, have been implicated in the making of the modern world. Instead of taking drugs as inherently criminal and deviant, the course will look at how drugs have played a central role in the development of capitalism, colonialism and global inequality in the past 200 years.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC300H5 (Winter 2019)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC328H5 • Drugs in the City

This course will explore illegal urban drug markets in Canada and the United States. Specifically, it will focus on how urban drug markets and drug use are influenced by drug cycles, moral panics, the economy, and criminal justice policy. Moreover, it will sociologically analyze the business practices, subcultures, and gendered interactions of drug market participants.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC329H5 • Law & Social Movements

This course focuses on how popular movements and legal institutions influence efforts to produce or prevent social change. Taking a comparative approach, it examines the social conditions that mobilize and sustain popular movements, factors that contribute to movement success, and the receptivity of courts to pressure from below.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC446H5 Advanced Topics in Criminology, Law and Society: Law and Social Movements (Winter 2020)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC330H5 • Criminology and Immigration

This course examines the intersection between immigration and crime control. More specifically, it examines immigration detention and deportation, concerns with immigrant risk, security and terrorism, as well as the impact of public policy on immigration and crime.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: CRI383H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC331H5 • Gender and Criminal Justice

This course explores how gender impacts criminalization and how gender shapes the way criminal justice is conceptualized and delivered. Possible topics may include masculinity & criminalization; gender & policing; gender & court outcomes; women's prisons, and trans issues in prisons.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC332H5 • Race and Ethnicity in Canada

This course deals with the social construction of racial and ethnic categories in the Canadian context, as well as with how Canadian institutions have used racial and ethnic categories to generate inequality and exclusion. It also addresses how individuals, social movements and institutions have at times worked to resist, challenge or modify these practices of categorization and exclusion.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC333H5 • Criminal Groups and Organizations

An analysis of the intersection between criminal groups and crime and organizations. This course introduces students to various organizational theories and examines how criminal groups and organizations form, crime by organizations, and crime that is "organized".

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC334H5 • Aging and Society

This course will examine (1) theoretical and empirical issues regarding demographic, economic, and social processes of aging as they affect individuals, families, and societies; (2) the variations in the process and meaning of aging across gender, ethnicity, and class; and (3) public policy issues concerning aging with regard to the process of public policy-making and effectiveness of relevant programs and services.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC246H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC335H5 • Political Sociology

This course will introduce students to the classic and contemporary view of political processes in small groups, organizations, institutions, communities and societies. Specific topics to be covered may include revolutions, state formation, ethnic nationalism, social capital and civic participation, gender politics, the various varieties, causes and effects of welfare states and social movements. The course will have both a Canadian and international focus.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC260H1 or SOCC39H3 or SOCB30H3
Recommended Preparation: SOC263H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC336H5 • Special Topics in Sociology

This course explores a particular area within sociology. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC337H5 • Special Topics in Criminology, Law and Society

This course will explore a particular area within criminology, law and society. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC338H5 • Legal Developments in Criminology

This course will survey new legal developments in the field of criminology and criminal law. It will explore the intersections between criminal law and other forms of regulation in society.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC339H5 • The Indian Act: Canadian Law, Sovereignty and Indigenous Womxn

In discussions about Indigenous Peoples and law, the Indian Act is one of the most cited pieces of Canadian legislation. From explaining the history of residential schooling to violence against Indigenous womxn, critical and Indigenous scholars turn to the Indian Act as a key source and problem space. We will center the work of Indigenous feminist scholarship to understand why scholars argue that the act is still both required and a site of contestation, violence, and genocide, and how we are each affected by its governance.

Prerequisites: 1.0 SSC credit

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC340H5 • Social Change

Understanding social transformation is at the heart of sociological inquiry. This course introduces students to the sociological analysis of social change - particularly how societies evolve into complex systems. The course examines how social, political and economic institutions are transformed by social change, as well as how these institutions can themselves promote social change. We also examine how citizens can affect change through social and political participation. In addition to classical foundations, the course covers a range of contemporary themes including inequality and stratification, social movements, globalization, and law and justice.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC341H5 • Contemporary Issues in the Sociology of Work

This course will focus on key changes in the world of work since the 1970s and their implications for different groups. We will engage different sides of debates about such issues as women in the workforce, recent immigrant and migrant workers, unions and mobility. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on how class, gender, ethnic and race relations shape work and occupations.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOCC15H3
Recommended Preparation: SOC227H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC342H5 • Sociology of Scandals

This course takes up scandals as sociological events: What are the causes of scandals? How are scandals 'made'? How are scandals represented? and What are the consequences of scandals? The course will pay attention to how scandals are made public: Leaks, investigations, whistleblowers, and media reporting, and the framing of events as scandals worth of public condemnation. To do so, this course will focus on scandals among professionals, in the private corporate sector and in government, domestically and worldwide, both current and past. By understanding scandals as sociological events, students will learn to trace how scandals may lead to new organizational, professional, social, cultural, and political responses.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 200 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC343H5 • Urban Sociology

The course will introduce students to the core and cutting-edge scholarship in urban sociology. We will discuss theories and empirical studies related to the issue of urban politics, including the issues of food, housing, gentrification, and neighborhood change. Despite the focus on Canadian and American cities, this course also highlights global and transnational perspectives, such as immigrant experiences, “ethnic” restaurants, and forces of globalization that are intricately tied to urban lives. This course aims to open this discussion about how we connect the micro-level of our social interactions, consumption, and daily lives to macro-levels of progress, global economic forces, politics and culture.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC205H1 or SOCB44H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC344H5 • Sociological Approaches to Social Psychology

This course provides an overview of sociological approaches to social psychology, with an emphasis on how individuals' thoughts, behaviors, and emotions are influenced by both situations and larger social structures. Theoretical perspectives including symbolic interaction, group processes, and social structure and personality will be examined in depth and applied to understanding various topics; these may include self and identities, socialization, attitudes, emotions, deviance, mental health, and collective behavior.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC213H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC345H5 • Special Topics in Sociology

This course explores a particular area within sociology. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC346H5 • Special Topics in Criminology, Law and Society

This course will explore a particular area within criminology, law and society. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC347H5 • Sociology of Masculinities

In this course students will engage with foundational material on the intersections of gender, sex, and sexuality as they relate to masculinity. This includes foundational work on hegemonic masculinity and multiple masculinities.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC345H5 Special Topics in Sociology: Sociology of Masculinities (Winter 2017)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC348H5 • Indigenous Rights, Resistance, and Resurgence

This course explores Indigenous people’s confrontations with colonization through an examination of rights-based processes, resistance movements, and community-led resurgence efforts. Topics may include: rights, courts, and legal action; land reoccupation; political organizing;everyday acts of resistance and resurgence such as petitioning, social media, arts-based movements, and community initiatives.

Prerequisites: 1.0 SSC credit

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC349H5 • Sociology of Food

Sociological analysis of food in global, regional and intimate contexts. It links cultural and structural aspects of the food system, historically and in the present. Students will investigate and report on inter-cultural food practices in Canada.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC350H5 • Quantitative Analysis

The course is a continuation of SOC222H5 (Measuring the Social World) ) and introduces students to more advanced applications of regression analysis. In addition to producing and interpreting regression models, this course also focuses on diagnostic tools for addressing outliers and multicolinearity, as well as regression with categorical independent variables and dependent variables (including a basic introduction to logistic regression). This course is mainly project based. Students will develop their own research questions and hypotheses and use statistical software to analyze data in order to provide evidence for their hypotheses. All students in the Sociology and Criminology, Law and Society Specialist programs are required to take this course.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC300H1 or SOC252H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science, Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/11P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC351H5 • Politics and Violence: Spot the Difference

This course aims to develop a critical approach to the study of violence. We will examine the linkages between politics and crime, between violence and democracy and the political context of specific forms of violence, such as vigilantism, state, collective and, structural violence.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC346H5 Special Topics in Crime and Law: Politics and Violence: Spot the Difference (Fall 2017, Winter 2018)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC352H5 • Gender and Care

This course will examine how gender shapes the work of care, and its value in society. It will look at both unpaid and paid care and the relationship between them. It will compare how care is organized and it's value in different countries, and institutions (ranging from hospitals to homes) and consider care provided to children, elderly people and adults with disabilities. Contemporary topics include care from the recipient's perspective, and new efforts to value care work.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and 1.0 SOC/WGS credit at the 200 level
Recommended Preparation: SOC263H5 or SOC275H5 or WGS200Y5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC353H5 • Borders and Human Rights

This course focuses on the legal construction of international borders, with an emphasis on human rights. The course investigates a range of issues, including but not limited to, the 1951 Refugee Convention and refugee movements, the limits of citizenship rights, and the merging of criminal justice and migration enforcement, including the use of detention as a migration management tool.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC354H5 • Global Sociology

Approaches to transnational networks, structures and processes, such as diasporic networks, transnational corporations, and social movements.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC355H5 • Sociology of the Professions

Becoming a professional (doctor, accountant, lawyer, engineer, nurse, etc...) remains a coveted goal for many young adults and their parents. But what is a profession, and what do these disparate groups have in common? This course lays the groundwork for understanding how the "professional projects" define professions, limit entry, create internal inequalities and try to maintain their prestige. The role of policy is key to our understanding of the professions, and we will focus on the role of policies in the creation of professions, in the substance of professional work such as ethics, autonomy and commercialism, and on the role of policies in addressing social concerns of inequality and diversity in the professions.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC356H5 • Population and Society

This course will discuss interrelationship between human population and societal issues such as aging, reproductive health, gender, environment, and social policy. It will examine population structure and dynamics in relation to social, economic, political, and cultural elements of change in both developing and developed world. It will also examine historical population policy developments and the diversified national policies in relation to policy formulation, implementation, and effectiveness.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 200 level
Exclusions: SOC312H1 or SOC325H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC357H5 • The Legal Profession

This course introduces the legal profession from a sociological perspective. Focussing on the social structure of the legal profession, the course draws on the sociology of professions and the sociology of law and covers topics such as the creation of the profession, competition from inside and outside, historical and modern challenges to professional boundaries, and structural transformations and shifts. The course will provide examples from global legal professions. It does not teach how to think like a lawyer, nor does it provide the perspective of legal practitioners, but instead it provides social science perspectives for understanding how the legal profession is organized, differentiated, and transformed over space and time.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC358H5 • Indigenous People: Legal Orders and Law

This course examines Indigenous people's traditional and contemporary legal orders and confrontations and interactions with non-Indigenous legal systems. Topics may include: treaties; land and resource rights and laws; rights; self-government; governance; restorative justice; colonial legal systems; criminalization and criminal law; and/or international law.

Prerequisites: 1.0 SSC credit

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC359H5 • Gendered Identities

This course will focus on the production of gendered selves, femininity and masculinity, sexuality and sexual identities. We will draw from theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of gender and related disciplines, emphasizing the ways in which gender intersects with class, ethnicity, race, religion and other forces of difference in the production of identities.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Recommended Preparation: SOC263H5 or SOC275H5 or WGS200Y5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC361H5 • Sociology of Organizations

This course examines the structure and culture of organizations, including the range of management cultures, and how relationships among unions, management, and employees are affected by the social structure and culture of both the employer and the union as organizations.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 200 level
Recommended Preparation: SOC227H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC362H5 • Sex, Gender and Work

This course will look at the situation faced by women in the workplace and workforce, and the implications for male employees. We will focus on classic and current research, theory and debates about sex segregation in jobs and occupations, the wage and earnings gap, and access to and exercise of authority by women in management positions.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOCC09H3
Recommended Preparation: SOC227H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC363H5 • Sexuality and Crime

This course focuses on the socio-legal origins, regulations,and consequences of sexuality, reproduction, and sexual violence. Possible topics may include historical and contemporary sexual and reproductive regulations, sexual violence, sex offenders, sex work, pornography, trafficking, and hate crimes against sexual minorities.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC364H5 • New Directions in Social Inequality

This course reviews current ways of viewing and researching social inequality. Particular attention will be paid to how foundational work on social inequality connects to contemporary patterns, especially as demonstrated through current research.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC365H5 • Special Topics in Criminology

This course will explore a particular area within criminology. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC366H5 • Special Topics in Criminology

This course will explore a particular area within criminology. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC371H5 • Sociology of Punishment

Punishment cannot be analyzed outside of its historical, cultural, economic, political and social context. This course offers students a critical, multidisciplinary approach to the study of punishment in Canadian society.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: CRI340H1 or SOC413H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC373H5 • Economic Sociology

How is the worth of an item determined? What do financial crises reveal about social life? How do financial traders make decisions? Economic questions, and facts, are inherently sociological. This course teaches you to connect the economy to society by examining a range of phenomena that are more readily related to the economy,such as financial crises, CEO compensation, Silicon Valley innovation, markets and firms, but also those that are not,such as love, art, doormen, the organs of dead bodies, and nature. This course will emphasize how economic transactions create, legitimate, and transform social relations, how economic behaviour needs to be understood within its social context, and how economic principles permeate aspects of social life that seem to resist or lie outside of the economic realm.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC323H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC375H5 • Sociology of International Migration

This course will analyze the forces that cause people to leave the country of their birth. We will look at why some countries become predominantly leaving countries, and other immigrant receiving countries. Possible topics include the politics of integration, multiple citizenships, refugee and settlement policies, the development of transnational social spaces and transnational governance structures. Attention will also be given to the dynamics of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in structuring international growth.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC311H1 or SOC342H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC378H5 • Law, Crime and Justice

This course draws on case law to explore a particular area within law and justice. Topics will vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC379H5 • Criminology, Urban Life, and Social Policy

The city is an important site of human interaction, characterized by crisis and promise. Through the lens of the city, this course will examine the nature of various social problems, including their causes and impacts. In particular, we will consider how criminological scholarship can analyze and inform policy responses to these issues. Course topics will include a diverse array of issues related to criminalization, youth justice, neighbourhood-level inequality, violence, and the criminal justice system.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC380H5 • Gender, Politics and Society

This course analyzes the social structural forces that produce gender and the ways in which gender affects political and social change. Possible topics include: migration, social movements, social policy and the welfare state, and globalization. We will also pay special attention to the ways in which gender intersects with class, ethnicity, race, religion and other forces of difference.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Recommended Preparation: SOC263H5 or SOC275H5 or WGS200Y5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC382H5 • Genocide and Memory

This research-based course will engage students with the following two questions: Why does genocide happen? How do we construct, present, and maintain our memories of these terrible social phenomena? Students will spend the first part of the course learning about the sociology of genocide. Students will also be exposed to general theories of culture and the social construction of memory, and will be trained in qualitative methods, with a focus on basic field observation and field note writing. Students will take this knowledge and training into the field, using a sociological lens to look at genocide museums and memorials, and the people who visit them. The course will culminate in a final project based on the students' observations and analysis during one of several course field trips. The specific cultural and historical sites for the course will vary from year to year. As part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process. An interview may be required, with priority going to UTM Sociology and Criminology Majors and Specialists.


International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC384H5 • Media Ethics and Policy: Controversies in Mass Communication

This course examines conflicts and controversies in the media. The goal of the course is to analyze power struggles within the realm of the media in order to understand how they both reflect and can reinforce broader social inequalities. Special emphasis is paid to the role of media policies and regulations. Topics include censorship, violence, pornography, marketing, social media and privacy.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Recommended Preparation: SOC202H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC387H5 • Qualitative Analysis

This course surveys various qualitative methods sociologists use. Students gain insight into the craft of sociology through reading examples of the different qualitative methods, discussing the theories behind the methods, conducting hands-on research exercises and analyzing qualitative data. The objective of this course is to learn to design and conduct a qualitative research project and to analyze qualitative sociological data. All students in the Sociology and Criminology, Law and Society Specialist programs are required to take this course.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Exclusions: SOC302H1 or SOC204H1 or SOCC23H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/10P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC388H5 • Race and Indigeneity

This course examines how the concept of race, and the ideologies that inform it, impacts identity politics for Indigenous peoples. Special attention will be paid to the socio-cultural and legal effects of racialized knowledge production. Topics may include: human genome projects, museums, recognition politics, legal definitions, criminalization, access to resources, stereotypes and personhood.

Prerequisites: 1.0 SSC credit

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC391H5 • Independent Research in Sociology

This course is intended for Sociology Specialists and Majors who wish to explore a specific Sociology topic in depth. To enrol, a student must prepare a proposal form in consultation with a faculty supervisor and submit the approved form to the academic counsellor.

Note: Professors have discretion whether to take on an independent study; they are not required to serve as faculty supervisors.

Prerequisites: SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and SOC231H5 and 3rd Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may take a maximum of 1.0 credits of independent studies.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC392H5 • Independent Research in Sociology

This course is intended for Sociology Specialists and Majors who wish to explore a specific Sociology topic in depth. To enrol, a student must prepare a proposal form in consultation with a faculty supervisor and submit the approved form to the academic counsellor.


Note: Professors have discretion whether to take on an independent study; they are not required to serve as faculty supervisors.

Prerequisites: SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and SOC231H5 and 3rd Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may take a maximum of 1.0 credits of SOC independent studies.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC393H5 • Independent Research in Criminology, Law and Society

This course is intended for Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Majors who wish to explore a specific Criminology, Law and Society topic in depth. To enrol, a student must prepare a proposal form in consultation with a faculty supervisor and submit the approved form to the academic counsellor.


Note: Professors have discretion whether to take on an independent study; they are not required to serve as faculty supervisors.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 3rd Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may take a maximum of 1.0 credits of SOC independent studies.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC394H5 • Independent Research in Criminology, Law and Society

This course is intended for Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Majors who wish to explore a specific Criminology, Law and Society topic in depth. To enrol, a student must prepare a proposal form in consultation with a faculty supervisor and submit the approved form to the academic counsellor.


Note: Professors have discretion whether to accept students wishing to pursue an independent studies course; they are not required to serve as faculty supervisors.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 3rd Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may take a maximum of 1.0 credits of SOC independent studies.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC399H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their third or fourth year to work in the research project of a professor in return for SOC399H5 course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 3rd Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may not take SOC399H5 and SOC399Y5 concurrently.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their third or fourth year to work in the research project of a professor in return for SOC399Y5 course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 3rd Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may not take SOC399H5 and SOC399Y5 concurrently.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC401H5 • Doing Public Sociology

In this seminar course, students learn to communicate insights based in sociological research to a broader audience, beyond the university. Student design and execute projects (essays, creating a podcast or video, and/or public speaking) on sociological topics of their choosing related to law and/or crime. The course also provides students with guidance on how to locate sociological research through library resources and how to incorporate that research into their public sociology projects. Priority may be given to Criminology, Law and Society students.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: SOC456H5 (Winter 2018)

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC402H5 • Understanding Human Action

This course addresses a fundamental question in the social sciences: "Why do people do what they do?" Readings and discussion focus on classic and current sociological approaches to understanding human action, giving attention to topics such as rational calculation, decisions, cultural processes, values, attitudes, identities, perception, interaction, situational influences, and automatic cognitive processing. A recurring theme is the tension between individual and situational explanations of behavior.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level
Recommended Preparation: SOC350H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC403H5 • Prisons, Punishment & Surveillance Across the Globe

This seminar course will focus on possible solutions for issues related to prisons, punishment and surveillance across the globe. Along with this surveillance you have a rise in prisons and other forms of state sponsored punishment.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC404H5 • Special Topics in Social Policy

This lecture course will explore a particular area within Social Policy. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level
Recommended Preparation: SOC240H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC405H5 • Surveillance in a Digital World

This course introduces students to theories of surveillance and risk in the digital era. The era of big data has given rise to smart policing, preventative security measures, and data driven solutions which are producing new knowledge about risk. It focuses on how surveillance is shifting institutional risk practices within law and criminal justice systems and how marginalized populations and particular geographical spaces are constructed as security risks.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level
Exclusions: SOC448H5 Advanced Topics in Criminology, Law and Society: Surveillance in a Digital World (Fall 2019)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC406H5 • Vigilantism on the Margins of the State

This seminar examines the social problem of “vigilantism”. It focuses on how the act is defined in terms of scholarly works on punishment and policing, as well as mainstream popular opinion. The course looks at questions such as how vigilantism manifests in different geographic spaces (e.g. the “global north” and the “global south”), in rich and poor areas, and in different historical periods.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level
Exclusions: SOC421H5S Senior Seminar in Criminology: Vigilantism on the Margins of the State (Winter 2020)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC407H5 • Development and Social Change: The Case of China

This course introduces concepts, theories, and policies of development and underdevelopment. With China as a case, it focuses on social, economic, political, and cultural factors shaping the nature and meaning of social change.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level
Exclusions: SOC444H5 Advanced Topics in Sociology: Contemporary Chinese Society (Fall 2017, Fall 2018, Fall 2019)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC408H5 • The Sociology of Anti-Muslim Racism

This reading-intensive course explores historical and contemporary manifestations of anti-Muslim racism through a transnational lens, while paying special attention to scholarship from and about Canada and the United States. Issues related to gender and sexuality, race, citizenship status, Orientalism, colonialism, and military intervention cut across the readings.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level
Exclusions: SOC444H5 Advanced Topics in Sociology: The Sociology of Anti-Muslim Racism (Fall 2018, Winter 2020)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC409H5 • Masculinity and the Internet

In this course we will take an in-depth look at a number of topics related broadly to masculinity and the internet, including such things as the “manosphere”, incels, and representations of masculinity on social media. These topics will be examined through the lens of the sociological literature on gender and masculinities. A recurring theme relates to the questions: “Is masculinity changing?” Students will be encouraged to critically examine and evaluate these topics and the sociological literature in multiple ways.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC410H5 • Senior Seminar in Inequality

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of inequality.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC411H5 • Senior Seminar in Social Institutions

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of social institutions.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC412H5 • Senior Seminar in the Sociology of Work

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of work.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: SOC227H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC413H5 • Senior Seminar in the Sociology of Gender

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of gender.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: SOC275H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC414H5 • Senior Seminar in Political Sociology

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in political sociology.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: SOC335H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC415H5 • Senior Seminar in Indigenous Studies

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in Indigenous Studies.

Prerequisites: 1.0 SSC credit, including 0.5 credit at the 300-level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC416H5 • Senior Seminar in the Sociology of Culture

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of culture.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: SOC202H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC417H5 • Senior Seminar in the Sociology of Globalization

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of globalization.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300-level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: SOC236H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC418H5 • Senior Seminar in the Sociology of Health

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of health.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC419H5 • Senior Seminar in Race and Ethnicity

This course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in Race and Ethnicity.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC420H5 • Senior Seminar in Punishment

Restricted to Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Majors. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC421H5 • Senior Seminar in Criminology

Restricted to Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Major. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC422H5 • Sociology of the Body

The body is an inevitable part of our existence, but it has not always played a central role in sociology. This course aims to bring the body into sociology by drawing on multiple approaches to theorizing and researching the body as a fundamental element of social interactions. We will work to connect the body to power, social problems and diverse forms of exploitation, but we also examine how the body serves as a source of pleasure, joy, and resistance. Fundamentally, we will study the processes by which bodies are shaped, and in turn, shape our social life. Body topics that may be covered include, but are not limited to, the following: health and illness, fatness, fitness and sport, diet culture, taste, aging, disability, sexuality, beauty, cosmetic surgery, and eating disorders.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC423H5 • Identity Crime

This interactive course concentrates on identity theft and fraud. It provides a critical examination of definitions of, sociological explanations for, and responses to identity crime. Identity crime is examined in the broader context of privacy, national security and organized crime.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC424H5 • Law, Emotions and Justice

This course investigates emotional dynamics in law and justice. Topics will include public attitudes towards crime and punishment, the rights of victims in criminal proceedings, and restorative justice.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 credit of SOC credit at the 300 level
Exclusions: SOC420H5 Senior Seminar in Punishment: Emotions and Punishment (Fall 2019)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC425H5 • Gender in Global Contexts

This lecture course looks at gender relations from a global perspective, focusing on how the social, political and economic aspects of globalization affect gender relations within various (local) contexts. Possible topics include gender and international migration, women's activism in local/global perspective and post-colonialism.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level
Recommended Preparation: SOC263H5 or SOC275H5 or WGS200Y5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC426H5 • Social Theory and Third Cinema

This course is an exploration of the societies of Asia, Africa, and Latin America through films created by directors living and working in the Global South. Each week, we’ll pair a social theory reading with a film made in the Global South to explore themes of colonialism, political economy, race, class, gender, power, and history.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC427H5 • Politics, Violence, Democracy and Human Rights in Latin America

This course examines the transnational, national and local historical, social and political contexts that produce, and is in turn affected by, criminal, state and other forms of violence in Latin America, and the challenges that this poses for the functioning of Latin American democracies and for the everyday life of people in the region, whose human and civil rights are frequently violated.  Examples of transnational factors examined may include the legacies of the Cold War, the impact of the U.S. war on drugs, and the circulation of ideas about punishment throughout the hemisphere. We also contextualize the presence of violence into the historical and contemporary political and social realities of particular Latin American countries.


Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC428H5 • Health, Disability, and Crisis

This course will apply sociological theories of inequality, health, and disability to contemporary problems associated with economic and health crises, including the COVID-19 pandemic. This course integrates both quantitative and qualitative methods across substantive themes, providing an opportunity for students to link theories to data.

Prerequisites: SOC221H5 and SOC222H5
Recommended Preparation: SOC350H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC429H5 • Disability, Politics and Society

This course situates disability within a social and political context. We focus on how disability serves as a basis for exclusion from social, legal, political and economic institutions as well as the ways in which actors (policymakers, activists, etc.) have sought to undermine this system of discrimination. We will investigate a variety of related themes including the “social model of disability,” policy and judicial transformations, the evolution of the disability rights movement (including the use of legal mobilization), disability identity, intersectionality, and the future of disability politics and the law.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC430H5 • Developments in Sociological Theory

This course presents a discussion and in-depth analysis of strands in contemporary sociological theory from the 1920s to the present day. Topics may include race and ethnicity, gender, class, post-colonial theory, queer theory, intersectionality, symbolic interactionism, new institutionalism, post-structuralism, and culture.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300-level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC431H5 • Museums & Indigenous Peoples

This seminar in Indigenous Studies focuses on the evolving relationship between Indigenous peoples and museums. It explores changes to museum policy and practice, the repatriation of Indigenous bodies, objects, and knowledges, the development of Indigenous museums, and the contributions of Indigenous artists to a new museology.

Prerequisites: 1.0 SSC credit, including 0.5 credit at the 300-level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC432H5 • Contemporary Issues in Genocide and State Violence

This advanced lecture course will provide students with the analytical tools necessary to engage in deep analysis of contemporary genocides and state violence.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and SOC206H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level.
Exclusions: SOC445H5 (Fall 2009, Winter 2010)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC433H5 • Power and Cultural Politics

This lecture course will ask students to engage with classic and contemporary views on power and its relation to the social bases of politics and social movements.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level
Exclusions: SOC324H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC434H5 • Race, Class, Gender in the Global South

Three of the most fundamental cleavages in the contemporary world-economy are those between whites and people of colour, men and women, and capital and labour. This seminar course focuses on these cleavages and analyzes each through both an historical and global south perspective.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: SOC444H5 Advanced Topics in Sociology: Global Perspectives on Race, Class and Gender (Winter 2018)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC435H5 • Sociology of Environmental Health

This course will examine environmental health with an emphasis on environmental justice, contested illness, and the politics of scientific knowledge production. We will study the politics of environmental health through case studies on activism in response to hazards, the tactics of corporate “product defense,” and the challenges of policy response.

Prerequisites: SOC100H5 and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC439Y5 • Research Project in Sociology

This is a seminar course where students engage in an independent research project supervised by a faculty member in Sociology. Students develop a research proposal, conduct independent research, analyze data and present findings. Admission by academic merit. Preference given to eligible Sociology Specialists.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC440Y5 • Research Project in Criminology, Law and Society

This is a seminar course where students pursue advanced research supervised by a faculty member in Criminology, Law and Society. Students develop a research proposal, conduct independent research, analyze data and present findings. Admission by academic merit. Preference given to eligible Criminology, Law and Society Specialists.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC444H5 • Advanced Topics in Sociology

An in-depth examination of selected topics in Sociology. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC445H5 • Advanced Topics in Sociology

An in-depth examination of selected topics in Sociology. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC446H5 • Advanced Topics in Criminology, Law and Society

An in-depth examination of selected topics in Criminology, Law and Society. Restricted to Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Major. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC447H5 • Advanced Topics in Criminology, Law and Society

An in-depth examination of selected topics in Criminology, Law and Society. Restricted to Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Major. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC448H5 • Advanced Topics in Criminology, Law and Society

An in-depth examination of selected topics in Criminology, Law and Society. Restricted to Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Major. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC450H5 • Walls to Bridges: Carceral Seminar

Based on the Walls to Bridges Program model, this seminar course matches a group of University of Toronto Mississauga students ("outside" students) with an approximately equal number of incarcerated students ("inside" students) who study together as peers at an off-campus setting. Topics vary from term to term. All class sessions are held inside the institution (e.g., penitentiary, detention centre, halfway house, etc.). Inside and outside students work together on small teams to develop and present a final project. Interested students should submit an application to the Department of Sociology (see website for details), and an interview may be required. Preference given to eligible Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Majors.

Note: Once students are accepted into this course a criminal record check (CPIC) may be required to access the offsite location for classes. Students are advised to schedule approximately seven hours for class time (to allow time sufficient time for travel, institution check-in and -out in addition to the seminar time).

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC452H5 • Contemporary Issues in Higher Education

This course explores the debates and discussions centered on a selection of contemporary issues in postsecondary education in Canada and elsewhere. This may include topics such as the massification and corporatization of higher education, the reliance on sessional labour for instruction, and trends towards credentialism. The course combines instructor- and student-led discussions and inquiry.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level
Recommended Preparation: SOC224H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC454H5 • Sociology of the Global South

This course examines the causes and consequences of empire, imperialism, and colonization to help better understand contemporary inequalities across the globe. The first part of the course focuses on theories of the Global South and the second part of the course applies those theories to the practice of social science research.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC455H5 • Comparative Indigenous Politics

Using a comparative approach, this course explores the politics of Indigeneity in settler colonial contexts. It centers critical analyses of settler colonialism and decolonization, and focuses on examples from Canada, the USA, New Zealand, and Australia to examine the differences and similarities between Indigenous peoples and politics in these places.

Prerequisites: 1.0 SSC credit, including 0.5 credit at the 300-level
Exclusions: SOC445H5 (L0101) Advanced Topics in Sociology: Comparative Indigenous Politics (Fall 2018), SOC445H5 (L0102) Advanced Topics in Sociology: Comparative Indigenous Politics (Winter 2019)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC456H5 • Senior Seminar in Law and Society

The course will examine substantive debates in law and society. Restricted to Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Major. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC457H5 • Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

This course offers an overview of some of the major theories and research programs in the sociology of race and ethnicity.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC459H5 • Science, Technology and Society

The focus of this lecture course will be on the varied social contexts of the emergence, development and consequences of science and technology in the modern world. In addition to critical sociological perspectives on science and technology, possible topics could include genomics, reproductive technologies, surveillance, the internet and social media, domestic technology, warfare, nuclear technologies, etc.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC460H5 • Migrant Labour

This lecture course will focus on the intersection of citizenship status and class by examining the position and experiences of various categories of migrant labour in North America, Europe and other regions. Migrant groups include those with temporary status who come to work for a specific time frame in a particular job, those with no status (the undocumented) who work mainly in an informal, unregulated economy, and immigrants with permanent resident status who work in a range of industries and occupations. We will read and write about theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of migration and related fields.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC463H5 • The Sociology of Disasters

The modern world leans heavily on the assumption that organizations run smoothly, but often they do not and sometimes the consequences are disastrous. This course draws on a variety of sociological theories and explanatory frameworks to better understand how any why large scale disasters occur. The class will investigate high risk technologies, issues and problems related to organizational culture, deviance and misconduct, community dynamics and resilience, environmental justice, and social problems related to racialization, gender, class, and other inequalities.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level
Exclusions: SOC444H5 Advanced Topics in Sociology: Sociology of Disasters (Fall 2016, Winter 2017)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC465H5 • Climate Change and Society

In this course a variety of classical and contemporary sociological perspectives will be deployed to understand the social context, factors and consequences of climate change. Possible topics include the political economy of the environment, environmental refugees, environmental movements, media representations of climate change, the social context and consequences of fracking, the politics of global protocols on carbon emissions, climate justice and social inequality, etc.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 1.0 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC467H5 • Peel Social Lab Seminar: Translating Research for the Wider Public

This is a seminar course where students work on data from the Peel Social Lab to produce various media to translate sociological findings for a broader audience.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC475H5 • Sociology of Legal Careers

This course examines legal careers from the sociological perspective. As one of the most elite and influential professions, lawyers are key players in economic, political, and social life. This course traces the various careers of lawyers from their experiences in law school to their jobs in law firms, courts, and other professional settings. In so doing the course will also focus on structures of inequality, such as gender, race and class.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC480Y5 • Internship in Sociology, Criminology, Law and Society

Through a part-time, unpaid, 200-hour internship, students apply sociological knowledge gained primarily through previous coursework. Students can seek internship opportunities at municipal social service departments or non-profit agencies providing social services, social movement or community-based organizations working for social change, courts or parole offices, for-profit workplaces, or other organizations. This experiential learning course also includes class meetings, written assignments and oral presentations, as well as an assessment by the internship employer. An application/interview may be required (see Department of Sociology website for details).

Note: International students should visit the International Education Centre to ensure they have the appropriate documentation required to work in Canada well before the start of the course/internship.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 4th Year Standing and minimum CGPA 3.0 and permission of instructor

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC485H5 • Investigation through Study Abroad

An in-depth examination of selected topics in sociology as part of a UTM Study Abroad experience. Topics vary from year to year and are noted on the timetable once confirmed. During the international experience, students will collect data and observations to use as the basis for a final analytical project. As part of this course, students will have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process. An interview may be required, with priority given to Sociology and Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Majors.


International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC491H5 • Independent Research in Sociology

This course is intended for Sociology Specialists and Majors who wish to explore a specific Sociology topic in depth. To enrol, a student must prepare a proposal form in consultation with a faculty supervisor and submit the approved form to the academic counsellor.


Note: Professors have discretion whether to take on an independent study; they are not required to serve as faculty supervisors.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may take a maximum of 1.0 credits of SOC independent studies.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC492H5 • Independent Research in Sociology

This course is intended for Sociology Specialists and Majors who wish to explore a specific Sociology topic in depth. To enrol, a student must prepare a proposal form in consultation with a faculty supervisor and submit the approved form to the academic counsellor.


Note: Professors have discretion whether to take on an independent study; they are not required to serve as faculty supervisors.

Prerequisites: (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may take a maximum of 1.0 credits of SOC independent studies.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC493H5 • Independent Research in Criminology, Law and Society

This course is intended for Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Majors who wish to explore a specific Criminology, Law and Society topic in depth. To enrol, a student must prepare a proposal form in consultation with a faculty supervisor and submit the approved form to the academic counsellor.

Note: Professors have discretion whether to take on an independent study; they are not required to serve as faculty supervisors.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300-level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may take a maximum of 1.0 credits of SOC independent studies.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC494H5 • Independent Research in Criminology, Law and Society

This course is intended for Criminology, Law and Society Specialists and Majors who wish to explore a specific Criminology, Law and Society topic in depth. To enrol, a student must prepare a proposal form in consultation with a faculty supervisor and submit the approved form to the academic counsellor.


Note: Professors have discretion whether to take on an independent study; they are not required to serve as faculty supervisors.

Prerequisites: (SOC109H5 or SOC209H5) and (SOC205H5 or SOC231H5) and SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 0.5 SOC credit at the 300 level and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may take a maximum of 1.0 credits of SOC independent studies.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC499H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a rewarding opportunity for students in their fourth year to undertake relatively advanced work in the research project of a professor in return for SOC499H5 course credit. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: SOC221H5 and SOC222H5, 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may not take SOC499H5 and SOC499Y5 concurrently.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

SOC499Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a rewarding opportunity for students in their fourth year to undertake relatively advanced work in the research project of a professor in return for SOC499Y5 course credit. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: SOC221H5 and SOC222H5 and 4th Year Standing and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may not take SOC499H5 and SOC499Y5 concurrently.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

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