ANT101H5 • Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Anthropology is the global and holistic study of human biology and behaviour, and includes four subfields: biological anthropology, archaeology, sociocultural anthropology and linguistic anthropology. The material covered is directed to answering the question: What makes us human? This course is a survey of biological anthropology and archaeology.

Exclusions: ANT100Y1 or ANTA01H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

ANT102H5 • Introduction to Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology

Anthropology is the global and holistic study of human biology and behaviour, and includes four subfields: biological anthropology, archaeology, sociocultural anthropology and linguistic anthropology. The material covered is directed to answering the question: What makes us human? This course is a survey of sociocultural and linguistic anthropology. In some years, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process.

Exclusions: ANT100Y1 or ANTA02H3

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT200H5 • Introduction to the Practice of Archaeology

Archaeological theory, method and technique. Principles of scientific research will be applied to archaeological information. The course will cover the following topics: how archaeology applies the scientific method; how archaeological projects are planned and organized; how archaeological data are recovered through survey, excavation and other means; how archaeological data are organized and analyzed to produce information about the human past; the major theoretical paradigms that archaeologists use to interpret the human past.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5
Exclusions: ANT200Y5 or ANT200Y1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT201H5 • World Archaeology

Archaeological survey of human cultural development from a global perspective, including: the elaboration of material culture; the expansion of social inequality; the development of diverse food procurement (hunter-gatherer-fisher) and food production (herding-agricultural) economies; and the changes in patterns of mobility over time and between world areas, with the growth of village and city life. Students will engage with the current state of archaeological research and some of the major issues archaeologists address in their recreations of archaeologically-based human history.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5
Exclusions: ANT200Y5 or ANT200Y1
Recommended Preparation: ANT102H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT202H5 • Biological Anthropology: Human Variation and Adaptation

Biological anthropology deals with the diversity and evolution of human beings and their living and fossil relatives, and how they have adapted to their environments. This course will introduce students to basic concepts of human genetics and Mendelian inheritance. The course will also describe the biological and evolutionary factors that have produced the fascinating diversity observed in human populations, and illustrate different ways in which humans have adapted to their environments.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5 or BIO152H5
Exclusions: ANT203Y5 or ANT203Y1 or ANTB15H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT203H5 • Biological Anthropology: Primatology and Palaeoanthropology

Biological anthropology deals with the diversity and evolution of human beings and their living and fossil relatives, and how they have adapted to their environments. This course will introduce students to the remarkable biological diversity of our taxonomic order: the primates. The course will also discuss the rich fossil evidence for human evolution and its interpretation.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5 or BIO153H5
Exclusions: ANT203Y5 or ANT203Y1 or ANTB14H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT204H5 • Sociocultural Anthropology

A general introductory course emphasizing social and political organization, economics, and the development of theory. Specific cases of social dynamics are drawn from both traditional and contemporary societies.

Prerequisites: ANT102H5
Exclusions: ANT204Y5 or ANT207H1 or ANTB19H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT205H5 • Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

Introduction to the field of forensic anthropology. Outlines the areas in which forensic anthropologists may contribute to a death investigation and introduces basic concepts relating to the recovery and analysis of human remains.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5 or BIO152H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT206H5 • Culture and Communication

Introduction to linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics. This includes: the issue of meaning in language, the use of language in context, the role of language in the organization of human activity, language and identity, the sequential organization of talk-in-interaction.

Prerequisites: ANT102H5
Exclusions: ANT206Y5 or ANT253H1 or ANTB21H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT207H5 • Being Human: Classic Thought on Self and Society

The question of what it means to be human has been at the core of anthropology for over two centuries, and it remains as pressing now as it ever was. This course introduces students to some classic attempts at addressing this question with specific reference to the nature of personhood and social life. By engaging with the writings of Marx, Weber, Freud, and DeBeauvoir among other great thinkers of the modern age, students will develop deeper knowledge of the major theories guiding anthropological research. We will pay close attention to how arguments are constructed in these texts and focus on the methodologies that these pioneers of social thought developed in their inquiries. The course covers enduring topics ranging from the production of social inequality, what it means to be an individual, how collective life is shaped by economic markets, and the role of religion in shaping human experience, to develop an understanding of central issues facing the world today.

Prerequisites: ANT102H5
Exclusions: ANT204Y5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT208H5 • The Culture Machine: The Anthropology of Everyday Life

This course will introduce students to culture and social theory via the lens of popular culture. Commodities, advertising, and new technologies will be considered in light of their cultural content. The course may consider the marketing of identities, gender, sexualities, bodies, ethnicity, religion, and ideology, as well as resistance.


Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT209H5 • War, Trade and Aid: The Anthropology of Global Intervention

This course explores how anthropology approaches the study of various interventions into human life and society. These forms of intervention--nation building, human rights, and development--differ in the scale and scope of their projects and in what they hope to accomplish. They also have much in common. Each is explicitly concerned with improving the conditions under which people live, and yet each has also been criticized for making things worse rather than better. This course will explore why this might be the case by focusing on examples taken from around the world.


Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT210H5 • Fantasies, Hoaxes and Misrepresentations of the Ancient World

Have you ever wondered why television programs like Ancient Aliens are so popular or if they have any merit? Have you also wondered why outrageous ideas about the human past seem to be more popular than the message science presents? This course critically evaluates the anatomy of significant hoaxes, outrageous claims, and just plain old "bad archaeology" in popular culture. Students will develop the tools to critically evaluate potential hoaxes and fictional accounts of the past by investigating a wide variety of cases that range from attempts to rewrite history using fake discoveries, to the simply outrageous claims created in order to promote racist agendas, to make money, or just for the fun of duping an unsuspecting public.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT211H5 • Sex, Evolution and Behaviour

This course provides an introduction to the evolutionary significance of mating behaviours and sexual reproduction in modern humans. Students will explore human sexual behaviour with an emphasis on the evolutionary explanations for our mating strategies in relation to other primates. Through lectures, films and readings students will examine such topics as sexual selection, anatomy, sexual development, social organization, and mating patterns.

Exclusions: ANT331H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

ANT214H5 • Anthropology of Food and Nutrition

This course explores human food use and nutrition from a broad anthropological perspective. It examines archaeological evidence of dietary patterns of human ancestors and examines contemporary phenomena such as the preference for sweetness and lactase persistence that are the legacy of ancestral adaptations. It explores significant food revolutions, from the origins of agriculture to the relatively recent phenomenon of biotechnological food production and looks at both the positive and negative effects of these changes on patterns of human growth and health. The goal of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of nutrition science that is contextualized in contemporary anthropological debates about the costs of changing food systems.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT215H5 • How Should One Live? An Introduction to the Anthropology of Ethics

Few questions are more obviously important than that which Socrates poses in Plato's Republic: "how should one live?" This course considers the various ways this question has been asked and the answers it has received across a range of very different contexts. It begins with Socrates' address to the Athenian assembly in The Apology and his conclusion that the examined life is the only one worth living. We then turn to the Greek past and the Homeric background against which the reflective life, that Socrates exemplified, stood in stark contrast. With this background in place we will proceed to consider the various ways in which the question of how one should live has been answered across of a range of social settings. Drawing on ethnography as well journalism and documentary film we will consider, for instance, Rastafarianism, Jainism, living "off-grid" in North America, deaf communities in the US, transgenderism, and non-binary gender identity.

Recommended Preparation: ANT102H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT216H5 • Racketeers, Smugglers and Pirates: Anthropology of Illegality

This course will explore anthropological approaches to the study of various forms of illegal activities. Denaturalizing the state-imposed categories of legality and illegality, the course will examine how the legal-illegal divide is constructed contingently, and unpack moralities, inequalities, precarities, and forms of politics that illegal activities both rely on and make possible. The course will bring together recent ethnographies of racketeering, gang violence, piracy, human trafficking and contraband smuggling from different world regions.


Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT217H5 • Anthropology of Law

The course is designed to introduce the key concepts, issues, and methods of legal anthropology as a specific field of study in relation to the larger history of the discipline. The course will explore how anthropological works understand and examine the legal and social orders, political and normative authorities, frames of rights, regimes of crime and punishment, and forms of justice-seeking. Accounting for different understandings of law and everyday legal practices, the course readings include canonical texts of legal anthropology as well as recent ethnographies of law.


Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT218H5 • The Social Conquest of Earth

This course is a quest for the secret of human uniqueness. The success of Homo sapiens, has been described as "a spectacular evolutionary anomaly" that has resulted in human domination of the Earth's biosphere. We will use the comparative method to journey through the Animal Kingdom in hopes of discovering the preadaptive elements that enabled such incredible evolutionary success. On our way we will survey chimpanzee warfare, tool using octopuses, eusocial ants, and night-time hunter-gatherer sentinels - all of which will allow us to better understand the forces that shaped unparalleled cooperative networks in humans. Finally, we will investigate the cognitive and behavioural blessings and curses associated with the drive to belong to a group. The goal of the course is to equip students with a greater understanding of the human condition - and how to leverage this understanding to improve their lives.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT219H5 • How Do We Know? The Social Anthropology of Knowledge

“How do we know what we know?” is a question that has long concerned anthropologists. And in a world like ours – where “fake news,” religious credos and conspiracy theories coexist with common sense, mainstream media and scientific truth(s) – the question seems more important than ever. This course explore anthropological insights into knowledge and the question of how we know. To do so we will examine a range of contemporary knowledge-making activities which may include surveillance, witchcraft, conspiracy, governance, Artificial Intelligence and Big Data.


Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT220H5 • Introduction to the Anthropology of Health

This course introduces students to the many strategies anthropologists use to understand patterns of health and disease in human populations through time. It will serve as an entry point into the Anthropology of Health focus and will be a prerequisite for later courses in Growth and Development, Infectious Disease, and the Advanced Seminar in the Anthropology of Health. In this course, the concept of health is examined using bioarchaeology, biomedicine, medical anthropology, and epidemiology. The course examines evolutionary, epigenetic, and life history approaches to understanding chronic disease risk in human populations, culminating in an investigation of the role of poverty and social inequality on disease burden. Although the course is designed as an introduction to the Health focus, it is suitable for students seeking training in pre-health disciplines and is open to all students possessing the necessary prerequisites.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5 and ANT102H5
Exclusions: ANT208H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT221H5 • The Trust Paradox

The ultimate question that all life is bound to ask is: how do I survive? Our species, evolved a uniquely human answer, which led to our ascendance as the most dominant on the planet but at what cost? This course explores a central human paradox: how altruism, community, kindness, and war and genocide are all driven by the same core adaptation. We'll call this the Trust Paradox and the evolution of this suite of traits, best described as coalitionary cognition, is one of the most complex and ancient in our species. We will explore how this, often imperceptible drive, is responsible for our capacity for both cooperation and competition, and allowed us to navigate increasingly complex social landscapes. But in our vast modern world, has this blessing become a curse?


Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: Online

ANT241H5 • Anthropology and the Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island (in Canada)

This course will examine the relationship between the field of anthropology and Indigenous people of Turtle Island. We will examine the past, present, and future manifestations of this relationship. This course will emphasize Indigenous, decolonial, and community scholars. Students will be encouraged to think critically and reflect on their own world views.

Exclusions: ANT241Y5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT280H5 • Special Topics in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Special course on selected topics in biological anthropology and/or archaeology; focus of topic changes each year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT281H5 • Special Topics in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology

Special course on selected topics in sociocultural and/or linguistic anthropology; focus of topic changes each year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.


Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT299H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299H5 course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Exclusions: ANT299Y5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Exclusions: ANT299H5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT300H5 • Cultural Heritage Management: The Past in the Present and for the Future

Cultural Heritage Management, also known as cultural resource management or applied archaeology, aims to protect traces of the past such as artifacts, archaeological sites and cultural landscapes, that have meaning for people in the present. This course takes a broad look at cultural heritage, why it matters in the present, and why we need to preserve aspects of it for the future. Topics may include stakeholders and the politics of the past, mechanisms for the protection of heritage and archaeological sites, the heritage management industry, and the methods used to identify, document, and mitigate impacts to archaeological sites, and to preserve the materials recovered.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT306H5 • Forensic Anthropology Field School

Introduction to the field of forensic anthropological field techniques and scene interpretation. A 2-week field school will be held on the U of T Mississauga campus (Monday to Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., two weeks in August). Weekly 2-hour classes will be held during the fall term. In these classes, students will examine casts, maps, photos and other evidence collected in the field, for the purposes of scene reconstruction and presentation in court. Limited Enrolment and Application Process: see Anthropology department website for more details.

Prerequisites: ANT205H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 104P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT310H5 • Political Anthropology of Ancient States

Today most people live in state-level societies. But 8,000 years ago, no one did. Why such a dramatic change? This comparative analysis of ancient, complexly organized societies is focused on understanding the processes involved in the functioning of states, examining how various political, social, economic, and religious orientations affected state information, cohesion, maintenance and dissolution. What were the range of alternatives explored in the earliest and later complexly organized societies that developed around the world?

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT312H5 • Archaeological Analysis

This course will introduce the process of archaeological research, from project design through report write-up. The student will create a project proposal, choose methods of survey and excavation, describe and organize data for analysis, and summarize findings in a project report.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5
Exclusions: ARH312Y1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT313H5 • China, Korea and Japan in Prehistory

The exploration of the remarkable prehistories of China, the Koreas and Japan challenge western thought on agricultural origins, complex hunter-gatherers, urbanization and the development of centralized authority. This course evaluates current thinking about these issues in the three regions and examines the impact of local archaeological practice on the construction of narratives about the past.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT314H5 • History of Archaeological Theory

This course examines major schools of archaeological thought over time. We will explore how theoretical approaches to archeological explanations of the human past affect and are affected by how archaeologists investigate research questions and interpret archaeological evidence. Readings include historically important key works as well as recent syntheses.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT316H5 • South Asian Archaeology

This course surveys the archaeology of South Asia (modern-day India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and northern regions) from the Palaeolithic to the Medieval Period (+200,000 ya to ca. 1600 CE/AD) using a comparative framework. South Asia is a place where many external cultural traditions mixed with indigenous traditions to create new socioeconomic and sociopolitical entities and sequences. While we will examine classic examples of hunter-gatherer groups, early villages, urban settlements, regional polities, and large empires through time, we will also stress the contemporaneity of groups of people with very different lifestyles -- hunter-gatherers participated in trading networks with town and city dwellers, pastoral nomads moved through settled village regions during their annual migrations. The impact of archaeological research on the region today is seen through the politicization of South Asian prehistory and history that has strongly affected both interpretations of the past and modern political events. Cases such as the debate over the identity of the Harappans and the existence of the Aryans will be evaluated from both an archaeological and a political perspective.

Prerequisites: (ANT200H5 and ANT201H5) or HIS282H5 or RLG205H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT317H5 • Archaeology of Indigenous Eastern North America

This course is a survey from an archaeological perspective of Indigenous history in Ontario and the Eastern Woodlands of North America from earliest times until colonization. Themes examined will include technology, subsistence, shelter, landscape use, art, and trade and how these vary in time and space.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5
Exclusions: ANT317H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT318H5 • Archaeological Fieldwork

Introduction to archaeological field methods. Practical component of the field school takes place on the UTM campus during the last two weeks of August (Monday-Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm). Morning lectures (week one) covering note taking, map making, cultural landscapes, material culture identification and survey and excavation methods, are followed by afternoons in the field applying skills taught that morning. Week two is spent excavating at an archaeological site. During weekly laboratory sessions September – December students learn to process, identify, and catalogue artifacts recovered during the field component. Limited Enrolment and Application Process: see Anthropology department website for more details.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 27L/101P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT320H5 • Archaeological Approaches to Technology

Using hands-on learning as a primary approach, this course focuses on insights into social and cultural processes provided by the study of ancient and historic technology. Experimental, ethnographic, archaeological, and textual data are used to examine topics such as organization and control of production, style of technology, and the value of objects. Throughout, we will discuss social and cultural as well as economic and functional reasons for the development and adoption of new technologies.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5
Recommended Preparation: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT322H5 • Anthropology of Youth

This course will present various perspectives on the nature and dynamics of youth culture. The course will examine one or more of the following: capitalism and youth cultures, ethnomusicology, and discourses of "youth." Topics may include North American subcultures (such as punk and hip-hop) and/or ethnographies of youth from other parts of the world. The course may also use frameworks from cultural studies and semiotics.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT322H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT327H5 • Agricultural Origins: The Second Revolution

A second revolution in human existence began when people developed agriculture long after the origin of modern humans and Upper Palaeolithic culture. This course critically evaluates the shift to agriculture in the context of current ecological and archaeological perspectives. The concept of "agriculture" is evaluated by considering plant and animal domestication as well as resource management in a broad range of contexts.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT331H5 • The Biology of Human Sexuality

Human sexual behaviours will be examined through the lens of evolutionary theory. Through lectures and readings, students will examine such topics as genetic, hormonal, and environmental determinants of sex, sexual selection, and the influence of sex on life history and behaviour. Students will discuss research that has been published in this area, and will develop critical assessments of the literature and films.

Prerequisites: ANT202H5 or ANT203H5 or ANT211H5
Exclusions: ANT330H5 and ANT331Y5
Recommended Preparation: ANT211H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT332H5 • Human Origins I: Early Ancestors to Homo

What does it mean to be human? Paleoanthropologists address this question by using fossil evidence to piece together our evolutionary history. Who we are today is a product of our biological and geological past. We will begin this quest by looking at ourselves as primates, and then we will traverse back through time to study primate origins, evolution, adaptations, and behaviour until we reach our genus, Homo.

Prerequisites: ANT202H5 and ANT203H5
Exclusions: ANT332Y5 or ANT335Y1 or ANTC16H3 or ANTC17H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT333H5 • Human Origins II: The genus Homo

What does it mean to be human? This course will examine the evolutionary journey through the genus Homo by examining the fossil evidence and the archeological record. Through this examination we will discover the unique biological and behavioural characteristics of modern humans.

Prerequisites: ANT332H5
Exclusions: ANT332Y5 or ANT335Y1 or ANTC16H3 or ANTC17H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT334H5 • Human Osteology

In this course students are given hands-on experience in the identification of the normal anatomy of the adult human skeleton with accompanying muscle function. Metrical variation, growth and development, bone histology, and methods of individual identification are introduced.

Prerequisites: ANT202H5 and ANT203H5
Exclusions: ANT334Y5 or ANT334H1 or ANT334Y1 or ANTC47H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT335H5 • Anthropology of Gender

Gender concerns the ways that groups define and experience what it is to be male, female, or a gender identity in-between or outside of that binary, and in all societies the boundaries of gender categories are both policed and resisted. In this course we examine how gender is made materially, discursively, and through intersections with other structures of inequality (e.g. race, sexuality, class, etc.).

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT206H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT331Y5 or ANT343Y1 or ANT343H1 or ANTC15H3
Recommended Preparation: ANT202H5 and ANT203H5

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT337H5 • Anthropology of Growth and Development

This course examines the fundamental biological principles of growth and how these are expressed throughout evolution. It explores the evolution of growth patterns among primates and hominins and compares patterns of growth among the living primates. The course examines human growth and development throughout infancy, childhood, and adolescence and explores the influence of genetic, epigenetic, and endocrine processes on the plasticity of human growth that ultimately produces the variability observed in our species. The goal of the course is to provide students with a complex understanding of how evolutionary and environmental processes interact in the production of growth and health in human populations.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or ANT203H5) and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT338H5 • Laboratory Methods in Biological Anthropology

This lab methods course focuses on laboratory techniques used by biological anthropologists to assess growth, health, and risk of chronic disease in human populations. In this course students will gain practical, hands-on experience in nutrition assessment, anthropometry, physical activity and sleep assessment, and human energy expenditure. State-of-the-art instruments and software are employed, ensuring students gain valuable knowledge of data management and analysis using applications suitable in both clinical and research settings.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or ANT203H5) and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT340H5 • Osteological Theory and Methods

This course instructs students in the osteological methods used to interpret the life course of past populations, and the theory underlying these analyses. We will explore how skeletal analyses are employed to interpret group identity and behaviour using a biocultural approach and will address ethical issues pertaining to human remains, including the goals of descendant populations. The theoretical underpinnings of osteobiographical analyses, biological distance studies, paleopathology, and paleodemography will be outlined. Students will observe human morphological skeletal variation as a result of taphonomic processes, sex, age, pathological conditions, and non-metric variance.

Prerequisites: ANT334H5
Exclusions: ANT334Y5 or ANTC48H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT341H5 • Anthropology of Infectious Disease

Infection is situated at the intersection of social and biological experience. This course examines why infectious disease occupies such a central position in our contemporary understanding of health. It examines the many theoretical and methodological approaches currently used to understand how humans experience infectious illness. Perspectives from bioarchaeology, demography, environmental anthropology, medical history, biocultural anthropology, and medical anthropology are used to examine the way epidemics and infections have been understood throughout human history and how those understandings continue to shape human perceptions of risk, the body and identity. Social inequality is a major focus of inquiry; the course explores how colonialism, globalization and injustice lead to significant and persistent health inequalities for many populations.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or ANT204H5) and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT350H5 • Globalization and the Changing World of Work

The course uses ethnographic material to examine ways in which global forces have changed the nature of work in different sites since World War Two -- North America, Europe, and the countries of the South are selectively included.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT350H1

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT351H5 • Money, Markets, Gifts: Topics in Economic Anthropology

Sociocultural anthropology has, since its inception, questioned the assumption that "the economy" ought to be understood as a domain distinguishable from other fields of human interaction, such as religion and kinship, or from power, politics, affect, and morality. This class offers a set of introductory readings that range from the analysis of non-Western forms of exchange and value to the study of capitalism; from stock-markets to the anti-globalization movement.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT378H1 and ANTC19H3 and ANTC20H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT352H5 • Protest, Power and Authority: Topics in Political Anthropology

This course explores ethnographically the social and cultural practices through which the exercise of power is legitimized, authorized, and contested, examining such topics as nation-building, non-governmental activism, human rights, and the global "war on terror."

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5 or POL113H5 or POL200Y5
Exclusions: ANTC32H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT353H5 • Queer Bodies: Gender, Disability, and Illness

This course explores key concepts in medical anthropology, disability studies, and gender and queer studies by examining how gender and sexuality matter in the contexts of illness and disability across a range of institutional, social, and national contexts. Students will learn to think critically about the body as a site of power configured in the social and material fields of heath/illness, dis/ability, race, and gender and sexuality.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT381H5S - Special Topics in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology (Winter 2021)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT354H5 • Capitalism and its Rebels

This class explores different forms of rebellion, insurgency, protest and political mobilization from an anthropological perspective, focusing specifically on anti-capitalist mobilizations. Grounded in ethnographies that range from studies of piracy, hacking, and the occupy movements, to struggles against the privatization of water and social movements organizing for "the commons," this course offers key insight into contemporary social movements, their deep groundings in the past, and the implications they might have for the future.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT322H5 in Spring 2014

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT355H5 • Disabled Cyborgs and Racist Robots: Bodies, Technologies, and Social Justice

How does technology mediate our ideas about the social differences of disability, race, and gender? By rethinking the role of technology in reproducing social disparities and challenging bioethical debates about enhancement, students will emerge with the tools to reimagine the relationship between technology, the human body, and social justice.

Prerequisites: 8.0 credits of which 0.5 credits must be a social sciences or humanities course at the 200-level or higher

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT356H5 • War, Peace, and Revolution in the Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives on Political Conflicts

This course will explore political violence and social change in the modern Middle East. What forms of loyalty, authority or rivalry have accompanied political violence? What economic activities and relations have been shaped by political conflict and peace in the region? What are the historical origins of nation-states, political regimes, and social movements in the region? By taking a historical and anthropological look at political conflict and change, this course will examine the transformations of the region in the last two centuries.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT357H5 • Nature, People and Power: Topics in Environmental Anthropology

This course examines anthropological approaches to the environment and environmentalism. Through key readings on indigenous peoples and conservation, traditional ecological knowledge, community-based natural resource management, ecotourism and the human dimensions of climate change, the course explores the complex social, cultural and political encounters that produce 'the environment' as a resource in need of management.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5 or ENV100Y5
Exclusions: ANT351H1 and ANT457H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT358H5 • Field Methods in Sociocultural Anthropology

This course investigates how sociocultural and/or linguistic anthropologists collect data, conduct fieldwork, and interpret research results. The course will benefit students who want to gain an appreciation of research design and practice and those considering graduate-level work in anthropology or another social science.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT369H1 and ANTC60H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT360H5 • Anthropology of Religion

This course considers anthropological approaches to western and non-western religions and religious phenomena.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT356H1 and ANTC33H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT362H5 • Language in Culture and Society

The course aims to introduce students to theoretical questions and contemporary research in linguistic anthropology. Topics include language ideologies, language and media, language and embodiment, as well as core theories in linguistic anthropology.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5 and ANT206H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT363H5 • Magic and Science

What's the difference between magic and science? Is there one? This course explores anthropological approaches to magic and science and related topics, raising basic questions about the nature of knowledge: what can we know about the world, and how can we know it? Through close readings of key anthropological texts, we consider what--if anything--differentiates magic and science, belief and truth, subjectivity and objectivity, irrationality and rationality.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT364H5 • Fieldwork in Language, Culture, and Society

This course will give students hands-on experience in methods for recording, transcribing, coding, and analyzing ethnographic data in linguistic anthropology. Students will synthesize weekly reading materials focused on these methods with actual, collaborative, in-class practice on a designated topic in the anthropology of everyday social interaction. Through this synthesis students will come to discern the relationship between everyday instances of communication between people and what the patterns of speech in this interaction may say about larger society. Students will be expected to develop their own analyses of the data collected under the guidance of the instructor and to formulate a final project.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT206H5 or JAL353H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT365H5 • Meaning, Self, Society

Humans, to paraphrase Clifford Geertz, are suspended in webs of meaning that they themselves have spun. This course introduces students to the tools anthropologists and others have developed in order to analyze and understand these "webs of meaning." Readings in philosophy, cultural theory and ethnography will be used to engage with questions regarding the construction of meaning in relation to ethnic identity, social structure, gender, political economy, personhood, and religion. Drawing on classic texts and the tools of semiotics, students will learn to apply the lens of symbolic analysis to interpret a range of contemporary social phenomena.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT367H5 • Sister Species: Lessons from the chimpanzee

Chimpanzees are our closest living relatives. In this course we will examine chimpanzee behavior, ecology, morphology, physiology, language, intelligence, and genetics. Through lectures, labs, films and writing assignments we will get an intimate look at every aspect of chimpanzee biology and behavior. Among questions asked will be: Why do animals use or not use tools? Why are animals aggressive? How does physiology influence what chimpanzees can eat and what's healthy to eat? Can chimpanzees use language? Do chimpanzees use medicine? Just how different are chimpanzee bones, muscles, and brains from our own? Throughout the class we will turn to use chimpanzees as a model to better understand ourselves and our place in nature.

Prerequisites: ANT202H5 and ANT203H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT368H5 • World Religions and Ecology

A study of the responses of selected world religious traditions to the emergence of global ecological concerns. Key concepts and tenets of the traditions and their relevance for examination of the environment crisis. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5 or RLG101H5 or ENV100Y5
Exclusions: RLG311H5

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT369H5 • Religious Violence and Nonviolence

Religious violence and nonviolence as they emerge in the tension between strict adherence to tradition and individual actions of charismatic figures. The place of violence and nonviolence in selected faith traditions.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5 or RLG101H5
Exclusions: RLG317H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT370H5 • Environment, Culture and Film

Our present environmental challenge constitutes of the most pressing areas of contemporary social, cultural, ethical and ecological concern. Acid rain, poisoned air, forest clear-cutting, ozone depletion, global climate change, toxic waste sites--the list goes on--all weigh heavily on our personal and intellectual lives. This course attempts to introduce students to both the scope and seriousness of present ecological concerns, as well as some core principles and concepts in the field of the intersection of environment and culture, through the lens of feature films. Themes such as the precautionary principle, urban/rural dualisms, ecofeminism, deep ecology, and the overwhelming burden placed on poor populations by environmental destruction are but a few of the areas which will be examined through the use of feature films, both classic and contemporary. We will do this in part by touching on some of the major writers and classic essays in the field, Class lectures will be supplemented by audiovisuals, guest lectures and class discussions.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5 or ENV100Y5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT371H5 • The Natural City: Cultural Approaches to Urban Sustainability

Since 2007, for the first time in human history, more than half the world’s peoples live in cities. It is estimated that by 2030 over 60% will be urban dwellers. This demographic shift suggests that for many (if not most) people, their primary encounter with “nature” will be urban-based. This course explores "the city" through a multispecies lens and challenges assumptions about the human-centeredness (anthropocentrism) of urban places. In this course students are invited to utilize a variety of approaches, including arts-based ethnography, journaling, archival research, photography, sound-scaping, et al., as we explore the following questions: How do ideas about nature-culture shape our interactions with nonhumans in cities? How do built environments structure human-nonhuman relationships in urban spaces? How have human-nonhuman interactions changed over time in cities? How can we foster more compassionate and caring relationships with nonhumans in cities - and how might we do this in the context of social-ecological injustices and climate change? What might a thriving multispecies city of the future look like?

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5 or ENV100Y5 or permission of department

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT380H5 • Special Topics in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Special course on selected topics in biological anthropology and/or archaeology; focus of topic changes each year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200-level prerequisite core course requirement(s) will be posted on the departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT381H5 • Special Topics in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology

Special course on selected topics in sociocultural and/or linguistic anthropology; focus of topic changes each year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200-level prerequisite core course requirement(s) will be posted on the departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT397H5 • Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading and initial research planning on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT397Y5 • Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading and initial research planning on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT398H5 • Independent Reading

This independent reading course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT398Y5 • Independent Reading

This independent reading course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT399H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods an opportunity to work in the research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Exclusions: ANT399Y5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods an opportunity to work in the research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Exclusions: ANT399H5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT402H5 • Wild Nights: Sleep, evolution, and performance in the 21st century

Sleep is essential to cognitive function and health in humans, yet the ultimate reasons for sleep - that is, 'why' we sleep - remains mysterious. This course integrates research findings from human sleep studies, the ethnographic record, and the ecology and evolution of mammalian and primate sleep to better understand sleep along the human lineage and in the modern world. Students will learn how to use 'wearable' technology, such as actigraphy, for scientific research. The goal of the course is to empower students with the theoretical and technological tools to be able to not only critically assess their own sleep-wake behaviour and performance but also popular generalizations about how to maximize long-term health outcomes.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or ANT203H5 or ANT220H5) and 2.0 credits in 300-400 level Anthropology or Psychology or Biology courses
Recommended Preparation: Priority may be given to students who are considering a Master's thesis in anthropology, psychology, or biology. Basic statistics.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

ANT403H5 • Social Learning and Cultural Patterns

Social learning is fundamental to human experience, through which individuals, societies, and generations share information and practices, and form cultural patterns and norms. Learning how to do something is also learning how to be a member of a society. Understanding social learning enables us to make the connections between the population-level, intergenerational cultural phenomena and the measurable individual-level process. This course uses case studies from anthropology, psychology, and biology to discuss the social, psychological, and biological foundations of social learning and the roles of social learning in enabling the accumulation of knowledge in human societies and shaping cultural patterns.

Prerequisites: At least 1.5 credits from (ANT200H5 or ANT201H5 or ANT202H5 or ANT204H5 or ANT206H5 or ANT218H5) and 2.0 credits at the 300-400 level in Anthropology or Psychology or Biology courses

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT404H5 • Current Topics in Palaeoanthropology

This course will introduce students to cutting-edge developments in the palaeoanthropological field. The weekly seminars will be strongly research-based, incorporating the latest discoveries, publications and debates. This course will also involve an in-class practical component during which the extensive cast collection in the department will be utilized, together with new 3D methods for fossil visualization. The goal of this course is to: 1) reinforce key theoretical concepts traditionally applied in the field, and 2) provide students with knowledge of the more recent debates and methodological approaches currently pushing the boundaries of palaeoanthropology.

Prerequisites: ANT202H5 and ANT203H5 and 1.0 credits in 300-level anthropology courses and departmental approval.
Recommended Preparation: ANT332H5 and ANT333H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12P/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT405H5 • Behind Bars: Anthropology of Institutions and Confinement

This course explores confinement, institutions, and incarceration from a broad anthropological perspective. Bioarchaeological, archaeological, and ethnographic research on institutions (e.g., asylums, poorhouses, prisons) will be critically examined. The goal of the course is to provide students with a complex understanding of institutionalization through time and how health vulnerabilities are created and recreated.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT407H5 • Quantitative Methods in Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

This course will provide students with the basic analytic background necessary to evaluate quantitative data in biological anthropology and archaeology. Students will be introduced to foundational statistical concepts and research methods suitable for anthropological exploration. The focus will be on analysing univariate and bivariate data using both nonparametric and parametric statistical techniques, hypothesis testing, and methods of data collection. The goal of this course is for students to learn how to manipulate simple datasets, ask and answer theoretically relevant questions, and choose the appropriate statistical test for a given research problem. Students will receive hands-on training during lab components and will learn how to analyse data using relevant statistical software. Students will have access to a number of biological anthropology and archaeology datasets for class assignments. No prior knowledge of statistics and mathematics is required.

Prerequisites: (ANT200H5 and ANT201H5) or (ANT202H5 and ANT203H5)
Exclusions: ANTC35H3 and BIO360H5 and BIO361H5 and ECO220Y5 and ECO227Y5 and PSY201H5 and PSY202H5 and SOC300Y5 and (SOC350H5 and SOC351H5) and STA218H5 and STA220H5 and STA221H5 and STA256H5 and STA258H5 and STA260H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT414H5 • People and Plants in Prehistory

The relationship between plants and people through time offers important insights into our past, particularly human-environmental interaction, plant domestication, and agricultural origins and development. Students will learn archaeological plant remains identification and interpretation skills through a combination of laboratory and seminar sessions. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process. Skills learned in this course are also useful in forensic investigations. Students will develop a project based on archaeological material from Japan and/or Ontario in consultation with the instructor.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5 and 0.5 credit at a 300-level archaeology course, or permission of department

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT415H5 • Faunal Archaeo-Osteology

Examination and interpretation of faunal material from archaeological sites, to obtain cultural information regarding the site occupants.

Prerequisites: (ANT200H5 and ANT201H5) and (ANT306H5 or ANT308H5 or ANT312H5 or ANT318H5)
Exclusions: ANT415Y5 and ANT415Y1
Recommended Preparation: ANT312H5 or (ANT334H5 and ANT340H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT416H5 • Advanced Archaeological Analysis

This course will involve students in applied laboratory methods in archaeology. Each student will engage in an individual research project on an archaeological data set. Techniques will include basic description, measurement, quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis. The primary focus will be ceramic and lithic analysis.

Prerequisites: ANT312H5
Exclusions: ANT312Y1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT418H5 • Advanced Archaeological Fieldwork

Practical experience for students who completed ANT318H5 and are ready for more advanced field experiences. During practical component (last two weeks of August, Monday-Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm) students have responsibility for recording/documenting an archaeological site in the field, including survey and detailed mapping. Students also act as mentors to ANT318 students during pedestrian and subsurface survey, and excavation. During weekly laboratory sessions September – December students process, identify, and catalogue artifacts, and learn to write an archaeological report and site record form. Limited Enrolment and Application Process: see Anthropology department website for more details.

Prerequisites: ANT318H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 27L/101P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT430H5 • Special Problems in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Special seminar on selected topics in biological anthropology and/or archaeology; focus of seminar changes each year.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200-level and/or 300-level prerequisite core course requirement(s) will be posted on the departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT431H5 • Special Problems in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology

Special seminar on selected topics in sociocultural and/or linguistic anthropology; focus of seminar changes each year.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200-level and/or 300-level prerequisite core course requirement(s) will be posted on the departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT432H5 • Advanced Seminar in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Special seminar on selected topics in any scientific aspect of anthropology, including one or more sub-fields; focus of seminar changes each year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200-level and/or 300-level prerequisite core course requirement(s) will be posted on the departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT433H5 • Advanced Seminar in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology

Special seminar on selected topics in any social science aspect of anthropology, including one or more sub-fields; focus of seminar changes each year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200-level and/or 300-level prerequisite core course requirement(s) will be posted on the departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT434H5 • Palaeopathology

The study of diseases and maladies of ancient populations. The course will survey the range of pathology on human skeletons, (trauma, infection, syphilis, tuberculosis, leprosy, anemia, metabolic disturbances, arthritis and tumors).

Prerequisites: ANT334H5
Corequisites: ANT340H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT436H5 • Theory and Methods in Molecular Anthropology

Survey of theory and methods in molecular anthropology, a subdiscipline of anthropology that attempts to understand human evolution and the variation observed in our species using molecular information.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 and ANT203H5) and 1.0 credits in 300 level Anthropology courses
Exclusions: ANT336H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT437H5 • Advanced Seminar in the Anthropology of Health

This course is the culmination of the undergraduate Anthropology of Health focus and aims to prepare students for workplace application and graduate study in a wide range of clinical and research domains. The course brings together diverse branches of biological investigation (human biology, nutrition, growth and development, chronic and communicable disease) and undertakes a critical examination of theory and methods used in the study of human health. It traces the historical development of the powerful biomedical paradigm that dominates health research today and uses a critical lens to examine the systems used to measure and classify health and disease. It explores evolutionary and biological approaches to understanding human health by examining the concepts of adaptation and plasticity, genetic and epigenetic approaches, developmental origins and life history theories, social determinants of health, and critical medical anthropology. The course explores the profoundly influential role of social inequality on the production and reproduction of health in historical and contemporary populations.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or ANT204H5) and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT438H5 • Rethinking Anthropology from a Community Perspective

This senior seminar course engages students in a thoughtful dialogue and critique of traditional methodologies and theories in the subfields of biological anthropology and archaeology. The goal of this course is to give students a chance to reflect on the future of this discipline through a discourse with anthropologists and community members who have been involved and affected by anthropological studies. Topics will cover Cultural Resource Management and Rematriation in Canada, Gender Diversity and Ethnic Identification in Forensic Anthropology, Ethics of Museums, and the colonial foundations of Evolutionary Anthropology, and Primatology.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 and ANT203H5) and 1.0 credit in a 300 level Biological Anthropology course

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT439H5 • Advanced Forensic Anthropology

Forensic anthropologists are responsible for the search, recovery, and analysis of human skeletal remains in modern contexts. This course will explore the knowledge and skills used by forensic anthropologists to reconstruct the biological profile of the deceased, make an identification, contribute to the determination of manner and mode of death, understand the events that took place at the scene, and to provide an estimate of time since death.

Prerequisites: ANT205H5 and ANT334H5
Corequisites: ANT340H5
Recommended Preparation: ANT306H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT441H5 • Advanced Bioarchaeology

This course will combine theory learned in ANT340H5, Osteological Theory and Methods, with bioarchaeological methods to teach students how to conduct and interpret an osteobiography of human skeletal remains. Lectures and labs will cover techniques of sex determination, age estimation, stature calculation, evaluating health and nutrition, assessing markers of occupational stress, osteometrics, biological distance studies, and paleodemography.

Prerequisites: ANT340H5
Exclusions: ANTD35H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT455H5 • Toxicity and Environmental Injustice

The presence of toxic chemicals is a defining feature of contemporary life. But while toxicity is everywhere, it is not everywhere the same. Considering toxicity through medical and environmental anthropology, science and technology studies, and environmental justice, we will gain new perspectives on the politics of evidence, the nature of health, and the nature of nature. Creative, hands-on assignments will help us understand the toxic worlds around us at UTM.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANT433H5S - Advanced Seminar in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology (Winter 2021)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT460H5 • Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology

Survey of major theoretical perspectives developed in social and cultural anthropology. The main ideas and underlying assumptions of each perspective will be critiqued and evaluated for their contributions to the field.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5
Exclusions: ANTD24H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT462H5 • Living and Dying: Topics in Medical Anthropology and Global Health

This course is concerned with contemporary medical knowledge practices, with particular emphasis on Western medicine and Public Health. Through a set of key readings in sociocultural medical anthropology, students will explore topics such as the art and science of medicine, end of life rites and rituals, expertise, and the politics and perils of intervention. This is an advanced, writing -intensive seminar that will particularly appeal to sociocultural anthropology students, and those interested in pursuing a career in the health professions.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT463H5 • Anthropologies of Water: On Meaning, Value, and Futures

This class delves into the topic of water from an anthropological perspective by thinking of water not only as resource but also as meaningful substance, symbol, and mediator of human and non-human relations. Class will consist mainly of discussions of ethnographic readings but also of hands-on class exercises, field-trips, and auto-ethnographic work. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ENV100Y5 or permission of department

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT465H5 • The Anthropology of Islam

This course offers an upper-level overview of anthropological research on Islam and cultures of the Muslim world. In this seminar-style class, we will critically examine how anthropologists have approached the study of Islam and Muslim communities and whether there is something we can call the “anthropology of Islam.” We will approach these questions through the critical reading of challenging theoretical texts from the mid-20th to 21st century, but also by examining various manifestations of the Islamic tradition and the diversity and complexity of Muslim cultures around the world, including in sub- Saharan Africa, the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit at the 300-level sociocultural anthropology course or Permission of Instructor

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT467H5 • Are Media Turning Humans into Cyborgs?

The contemporary world is profoundly shaped by mass media. We might even ask if media technologies have changed what it means to be human. Democratic politics, globalized economic flows, and new religious practices all depend on modern technologies of communication, as does the discipline of anthropology. How might we make sense of how social media, television, radio, and film have shaped our lives from an ethnographic perspective? In this course, we will pursue this question through a series of studies of media use, production, and circulation in a wide range of cultural contexts, including the exploring centrality of media to the production of anthropological knowledge. Developing some of the themes that students might have been exposed to in ANT102H5 (Introduction to Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology) and ANT204H5 (Sociocultural Anthropology), students will also be guided in pursuing their own research interests in this upper-level seminar.

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5 or permission of the department

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT468H5 • Anthropology of Troubled Times

Rising sea levels, unnatural disasters, global displacements, energy shortages, poverty, racism, mediated mass-surveillance, conspiracies, populism, pandemics – all provide unsettling markers of our times. As chroniclers and theorists of the contemporary, anthropologists have been keen to diagnose and engage the moment. Their efforts have yielded dividends: key insights into some of today’s most pressing problems, as well as new analytic tools with which to capture them. This fourth-year seminar will enable students to survey a range of pressing contemporary concerns and to explore some of the ways anthropologists and cognate scholars are engaging with them. Because anthropology is part of the world it seeks to understand, the seminar will also consider anthropology’s own grounds of knowledge, dwelling on some of the epistemological, ethical and political conundrums the discipline’s real-world entanglements entail. This concern takes us beyond “troubled times,” inviting reflection on that curious Western project we call “anthropology.”

Prerequisites: ANT204H5 or permission of department
Exclusions: ANT433H5 (Winter 2022 and Fall 2023)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT497H5 • Advanced Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading, research and planning for a publishable report on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the research and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT497Y5 • Advanced Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading, research and planning for a publishable report on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the research and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT498H5 • Advanced Independent Reading

This independent reading course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT498Y5 • Advanced Independent Reading

This independent reading course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT499H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods an opportunity to work in the research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT499Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods an opportunity to work in the research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA210H5 • Arab Culture I

This course introduces the Arab culture in general terms and familiarizes students with some fundamental realities of the Arab world (e.g. family, gender roles, social etiquette, etc.) with a general introduction to values and religious practices. The course is taught in English.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA212Y5 • Introductory Arabic

This introductory course is designed for beginners, i.e., students with NO prior knowledge of the Arabic language. The course provides a basic proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The students will have ample practice of reading and writing the Arabic alphabet and will master the Arabic sounds and their phono-syntactic features. A foundation of grammar will familiarize the students with word formation, word order, and sentence structures. By the end of the course, the students should be able to fully read Arabic, comprehend simple reading, produce complete sentences to express basic information orally and in writing, and to conduct basic conversations in Modern Standard Arabic. All students are REQUIRED to complete the Arabic Language Assessment Questionnaire before enrolling in this course. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires and complete the Arabic Language Assessment Questionnaire by no later than August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.


Prerequisites: All students who are enrolling in an ARA language course for the FIRST time are required to complete a language assessment questionnaire. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…
Exclusions: ARA211H5 or ARA211Y5 or (LGGA40H3 and LGGA41H3) or (NMC210Y1 or NML210Y1) or higher, native speakers.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA300Y5 • Intermediate Arabic for Heritage Learners

This is an Arabic language course for heritage students, i.e. of Arab origins, who may have had passive exposure to Arabic but have never formally studied the reading and writing of Arabic. This course is also designed to help students with interest in Islamic studies who may have been exposed to elementary Qur’anic teaching but were never taught the alphabet, and who cannot communicate in spoken or written Arabic. In this course, students will begin by learning how to sound, read and write the Arabic alphabet. They will study Arabic grammar, develop reading comprehension, and practice writing skills that advance gradually throughout the course. Each unit of the course is fully supported by a range of comprehension, vocabulary-building, grammar reinforcement activities, and reading & writing exercises. Language analysis will be based on the reading of excerpts of authentic Arabic texts from contemporary literature, magazines and newspapers. By the end of this course, students will have completed the prerequisites to take Arabic reading, literature, and advanced language courses. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment… and complete the Arabic Language Assessment Questionnaire by no later than August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.

Prerequisites: As determined by assessment questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: ARA211H5 and ARA311H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA305Y5 • Introductory Egyptian Colloquial Arabic

This is an introductory course designed for high beginner level students, who desire to acquire fluency in spoken Egyptian Arabic, commonly known as Egyptian or Cairene Arabic. The course follows a teaching approach that places emphasis on the development of the listening and speaking skills of spoken Egyptian Arabic. This course develops communicative skills in Egyptian colloquial Arabic along parallel tracks of vocabulary and grammar. Therefore, student must be independently comfortable with the Arabic alphabet and must have developed elementary reading ability. The course is designed for students who have completed the beginner level of modern Standard Arabic ARA212Y5Y, and are now ready to branch out into their first experience of a major spoken dialect.

Prerequisites: ARA212Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA312Y5 • Intermediate Arabic

This course is for students who have basic background information in formal Arabic. To study this course, students should be able to write and speak simple sentences to express basic information in formal Arabic. The course builds on the skills that students have learned in ARA212Y5. By the end of this course, students should be able to use formal Arabic at an intermediate low level using ACTFL guidelines. Everyday language in the Egyptian and Levantine accents will be provided occasionally as supplementary materials for students' information only. However, students' skills will be assessed using formal Arabic only, which is the focus of this course.

Prerequisites: ARA212Y5
Exclusions: Native users or NMC310Y1 or NML310Y1 or LGGC42H3 or LGGC43H3 or ARA211H5 or ARA311H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA400Y5 • Advanced Arabic for Heritage Learners

This course develops the student's communication skills in grammar, writing, reading, and formal registers of speaking, into an advanced level. It caters to the students who have completed the intermediate high level: ARA300, or whose language assessment reflects an intermediate level of proficiency of Arabic as a heritage language. The teaching of this course will also focus on error analysis to develop the student’s ability to distinguish between their version of heritage spoken language and that of the erudite Arabic, الفُصْحى, as used formally across the Arab world. By the end of the course, the student will be able to write in a formal academic register, sustain oral expressions and deliver oral presentations in formal Arabic.

Prerequisites: ARA300Y5 or appropriate language level as indicated by the Arabic Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires).
Exclusions: ARA412Y5 and NML410Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA408H5 • Arabs in Western Literature and Arts: Reception and Interpretation

(Offered in English).This survey course examines representative fiction and non-fiction texts, painting, films, operas, comics and video games to explore salient incidences of encounter, impact, and reception of the Arabs in medieval and modern Western thought. Examples of topics of analysis are Islamic imagery in Dante’s Inferno, motifs of storytelling and narrative structures from the One Thousand and One night in Boccaccio’s Decameron and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales…From the Moors in Spain, to the Arabs in Sicily, from Shakespeare’s Othello to the Victorian Gothic Vathek, the course will move on to explore the extension of the French Orientalists’ influence beyond European painting to operas, and later in cinema, exploring works such as Il Seraglio, Lawrence Arabia, Casablanca and others. Current representations of the Arabs in Western films, TV shows, comics, and video games will be analyzed to trace continuity and discontinuity of the earlier reception. Students who take this course to be counted towards the Language Citation must complete written course work in Arabic.

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have completed 9.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA410H5 • Advanced Arabic Reading I: Reading the Sacred and the Legendary

This is the first of two intensive advanced reading courses in the Arabic language. Throughout this course, the students will also be familiar with different sacred texts such as Tafsīr (Quranic exegesis) and Qiṣas al-Anbiyā’ (Tales of the Prophets) to the fables focused on the description of amazing and mythological creatures such as Qazvīni’s ‘Ajā’ib al-Makhlūqāt wa Gharā’ib alMawjūdāt (Marvels of Creatures and Strange things existing) and Kalīla wa Dimna as well as the epic of the legendary Arabic heroin Dhāt al-Himma in Sīrat Dhāt al-Himma.

Prerequisites: ARA311H5 or ARA312Y5
Corequisites: ARA412Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA411H5 • Advanced Arabic Reading II: Literary Journeys into the Past

This is the second of two intensive advanced reading courses in the Arabic language. This course will concentrate on works relating to history which includes universal histories in the world from creation up to their own eras; biographies of individuals and biographical dictionaries, advice literature that guide rulers to govern efficiently; poetry by poets and poetesses; maqãmãt or works of rhymed prose; mystical texts; travelogues that describe the adventures and observations of travelers to faraway lands; annalistic chronicles that record events from year to year; and chancery documents that shed light on the way medieval administrations worked.

Prerequisites: ARA311H5 or ARA312Y5
Corequisites: ARA412Y5
Recommended Preparation: ARA410H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA412Y5 • Advanced Arabic

This course uses differentiated instruction and assessment methods to provide Arabic language instruction to two groups of students: 1) advanced learners of Arabic as a foreign language, and 2) heritage students who may have native or native-like proficiency in the Arabic language. Both groups of learners will have customized study materials and assessment schemes that provide for their specific learning needs and language abilities.

Prerequisites: (ARA312Y5 or ARA311H5). Students who have not completed ARA312Y5 or ARA311H5 must obtain permission from the department before enrolling.
Exclusions: NML410Y1 or ARA400Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST101H5 • Exploring the Solar System

This course explores Earth's local family, consisting of two types of major planets, newly identified dwarf planets, many moons orbiting the planets, and millions of smaller objects such as comets and meteoroids. This course examines how these groups are similar and different, how the solar system formed, and how our solar system compares to the systems of other stars.

Exclusions: AST101H1 or AST121H1 or AST221H1 or ASTA01H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST110H5 • Night Sky Observing

This course gives a practical introduction to astronomical observations of the night sky, concentrating on objects that can be seen with the naked eye or with small telescopes. Students will learn to identify objects in the night sky, the properties and designs of small and large telescopes, and to plan and implement astrophotography and observing projects from their backyard.

Recommended Preparation: SPH4U and MHF4U and MCV4U

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST115H5 • Cultural Astronomy

This course will explore the historic and ongoing relationship between astronomy and human culture. In this course, students will approach astronomical concepts through the lens of archaeoastronomy – the exploration of astronomical practices in ancient cultures, and ethnoastronomy – the study of modern astronomical practices by cultures around the world. Topics will include cultural interpretations of the motions of the stars, planets, moon, and sun, methods of navigation and timekeeping, puzzles that have inspired important shifts in our understanding of the Universe, and varying cultural conceptions of what science is and how it is done.

Exclusions: AST101H5 or AST101H1 or AST215H5 or AST210H1 or ASTB03H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class, Hybrid

AST201H5 • Exploring the Universe

The Universe extends from the Sun to the most distant regions we can observe. This course explores our Sun, the other stars, the Milky Way galaxy in which our Sun lives, other galaxies that are far outside our Milky Way, and the most distant objects we can observe. In addition, the course presents evidence that everything we observe is just a small fraction of what exists in the Universe. The course content considers how the Universe began and evolved over time and the possibility of life beyond Earth.

Exclusions: AST121H1 or AST201H1 or AST210H1 or AST221H1 or AST222H1 or ASTA02H3 or ASTB23H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class, Hybrid

AST221H5 • Astrophysics I – Planets, Sun and Stars

This course explores the astrophysics of planets, Sun and stars, including their observed variety, structure, formation and evolution.

Prerequisites: [MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5] and [PHY146H5 and PHY147H5 (Exceptions for PHY136H5 and PHY137H5 may be made with consultation of the course instructor)].
Exclusions: AST221H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST222H5 • Astrophysics II – Stellar Systems, Galaxies and the Universe

This course explores the astrophysics of the Milky Way, other galaxies, and the Universe.

Prerequisites: AST221H5
Exclusions: AST222H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST252H5 • Life in the Universe

This course addresses the question of life beyond Earth. Starting with our current understanding of how life began and evolved on Earth, the course explores possibility that life might have developed elsewhere in the Universe. It summarizes the evidence that the conditions necessary for life might exist today or existed in the past on other planets in our solar system. This search for evidence of life is then extended to the thousands of planets that have been discovered orbiting other stars.

Exclusions: AST251H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class, Hybrid

AST299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST320H5 • Astrophysics III – Unsolved Problems in Astrophysics

This course explores the formation, equilibrium, and evolution of structure on various astronomical scales through the investigation of major open questions in modern astrophysics. Topics may include exoplanet formation and evolution, supermassive black holes, the progenitors of type Ia supernovae, galaxy evolution, and the nature of dark matter.

Prerequisites: AST222H5
Exclusions: AST320H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST325H5 • Observational Astronomy

This course will guide students to develop the core skills to collect, reduce, and interpret astronomical data. Through a series of projects and observing labs, students will develop their skillset for the usage of telescopes, instruments, and detectors; reduction and statistical analysis methods; simulations and model fitting; and data and error analysis.

Prerequisites: AST221H5 and AST222H5
Exclusions: AST325H1 or AST326Y1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides third-year undergraduate students (after completing at least 9.0 credits) who have developed some knowledge of astronomical research with an opportunity to assist in a research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled in this course have the opportunity to enhance their research skills and share in the excitement of acquiring new knowledge and in the discovery process of science. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February, and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO152H5 • Introduction to Evolution and Evolutionary Genetics

The scientific method and the modern theory of evolution as an introduction to biology. The principles of evolution, transmission and evolutionary genetics are developed in lectures and laboratories.

Note:
Although 12U CHM and MAT are not prerequisites for BIO152H5, students intending to pursue a major or any specialist program in Biology must note that CHM110H5 and CHM120H5 and (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5) are requirements for these programs.

Prerequisites: Grade 12 SBI4U Biology (minimum grade of 70%)
Exclusions: BIO130H1 or BIOA01H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO153H5 • Diversity of Organisms

The consequences of Darwinian evolution: adaptations of organisms as a product of the main evolutionary mechanism - natural selection. The roles of natural selection and other mechanisms in the diversification of life are reviewed, along with the diversity of structures and life cycles in bacteria, protists, animals, plants and fungi.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5
Exclusions: BIO120H1 or BIOA02H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO200H5 • Introduction to Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetic Principles

Topics include absorption, distribution, biotransformation, elimination, calculation of dosages, variability in drug response and adverse drug reactions.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and CHM110H5 and CHM120H5
Exclusions: PCL201H1 or JBC201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO201H5 • The Biology Behind the News

News stories are used to explore areas of biology, to learn about the process of science, and to find and assess the validity of information. The topics for the course modules will change yearly because the course is designed to give students the tools to explore the biology behind the news, not to teach a comprehensive survey of biological facts. Reading, writing, and research skills are emphasized. This is a biology course for students in the Humanities and Social Sciences as well as other non-Biology Sciences.

Exclusions: Any BIO course (except BIO211H5) taken previously or concurrently.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

BIO202H5 • Introductory Animal Physiology

Diversity of structure and function in animals at the tissue and organ system level. Focus is on morphology and processes that sustain life and maintain homeostasis, including water balance, gas exchange, acquisition and transport of oxygen and nutrients, temperature regulation, electrical and chemical signal transmission, sensory processing, and locomotion. Principles and mechanisms of animal form and function are developed in lectures and laboratories.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and CHM110H5 and CHM120H5
Exclusions: BIO204H5 or (BIO270H1 or BIO271H1) or (BIOB32H3 or BIOB34H3)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/10T/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO203H5 • Introductory Plant Morphology and Physiology

Introduction to the morphology and physiology of plants. Students will learn that plants require energy to support metabolism and growth, and that these processes are highly regulated in order to achieve homeostasis. Topics covered include: biology of the plant cell, plant morphology, plant respiration and photosynthesis, transport processes, regulation of growth and development, and plant ecophysiology. Principles and mechanisms of plant form and function are developed in lectures and laboratories.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and CHM110H5 and CHM120H5
Exclusions: BIO204H5 or BIO251H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/10T/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO205H5 • Ecology

An introduction to the scientific study of ecology, emphasizing the structure and dynamics of populations, communities and ecosystems. Topics include population growth and regulation, competition, predation, biodiversity, succession, and nutrient cycling. Classic models and studies will be supplemented with both plant and animal examples.

Prerequisites: (BIO152H5 and BIO153H5) or (ENV100Y5 for students in Environmental Programs)
Exclusions: BIOB50H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO206H5 • Introductory Cell and Molecular Biology

An introduction to the molecular biology of the cell with an emphasis on similarities and differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Topics include the structure and function of: macromolecules, membranes, ribosomes, nuclei, intracellular organelles, etc. Other topics include: the central dogma of molecular biology (replication, transcription and translation), protein targeting, organization of the genome, gene regulation and regulation of the cell cycle. Tutorials will emphasize and consolidate concepts from lecture and text through individual and group assignments.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and CHM110H5 and CHM120H5
Exclusions: BIO230H1 or BIO255H1 or BIOB10Y3 or BIOB11H3 or BIOB12H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/6T/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO207H5 • Introductory Genetics

The principles of Mendelian inheritance and modern genetics are illustrated using examples from medical research, evolutionary biology, agriculture and conservation biology. Topics covered include: chromosome theory of inheritance, basic eukaryotic chromosome mapping, gene and chromosome mutation, the lac system, the extranuclear genome, population and quantitative genetics. In tutorials, students will work through problem sets related to lecture material as well as probability and statistical analysis.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and BIO206H5
Exclusions: BIO260H1 or HMB265H1 or BIOC15H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/18T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO208H5 • Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology I

The integration of the major organ systems involved in human biomechanics. A comparative approach is taken, placing the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems in an evolutionary context.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Exclusions: BIO210H5 or BIO210Y5Y or BIOB33H3 or BIOB35H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class, Hybrid

BIO209H5 • Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology II

The structure and function of the human body. Topics include integrating different organ systems, such as endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urogenital systems. An emphasis is placed on integration of structure and function of the major organ systems. As part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process.

Prerequisites: BIO208H5
Exclusions: BIO210H5 or BIO210Y5Y or BIOB33H3 or BIOB35H5

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class, Hybrid

BIO211H5 • The History of Our Living Planet

This course provides a survey of major events in the evolution of life and Earth's geological history. It includes overviews of science as a process, geological principles, climate, and evolution. Special focus will be on major events including origin of life, the Cambrian explosion, plant and animal radiations onto land, the Mesozoic evolution of dinosaurs, and the Cenozoic diversification of mammals. This is a biology course for students in the Humanities and Social Sciences as well as other non-Biology Sciences.

Exclusions: Any BIO course (except BIO201H5) taken previously or concurrently.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO259H5 • Introduction to Biological Data

This course introduces students to the exploration and analysis of biological data through computation. Students will learn to import biological datasets, parse and manipulate the data, and develop an intuition for basic statistical thinking through practical exercises and lectures.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Exclusions: BIOB20H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This program provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO304H5 • Molecular Physiology of Excitable Cells

The course will provide students with knowledge of the physiology of neurons, muscle and sensory systems by demonstrating the biophysical, ionic, and molecular bases of cellular excitability. Topics include the forces that govern ion movement through solution, the electrical properties of the cell membrane, the molecular properties of ion channels, and the molecular physiology of neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission, neuromodulation, and muscle contraction.

Prerequisites: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5 or BIO206H5 or (BIO208H5 and BIO209H5) or BIO210Y5
Exclusions: CJH332H1 or CSB332H1
Recommended Preparation: PHY100H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO310H5 • Physiology of Regulatory Systems

Principles of cardiovascular, renal, respiratory and digestive physiology of animals and their control by the neural and endocrine systems.

Prerequisites: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5 or (BIO208H5 and BIO209H5) or BIO210Y5
Exclusions: PSL300H1 and PSL301H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

BIO311H5 • Landscape Ecology

Landscape ecology asks how spatial patterns originate and how they affect ecological processes like forest dynamics, nutrient cycling, species interactions, and the distribution and population dynamics of plants and animals. Lectures and computer labs introduce students to concepts and methods of landscape ecology and their application to current issues of land-use management and global change. The students will learn to apply GIS, spatial statistics, landscape metrics, and modelling to address problems in conservation, biodiversity, and ecosystem management. Note: Students interested in this course will need to meet with the course instructor before being approved and permitted to enroll.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and (BIO259H5 or STA215H5) and permission of instructor *STA215H5 will no longer be accepted as an appropriate prerequisite course AFTER 2022-2023 Academic year. Beginning 2023-2024 Academic year all students will be required to complete BIO259H5 as the statistics prerequisite course.
Exclusions: GGR311H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO360H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO312H5 • Plant Physiology

This course focuses on the principal physiological processes in plants and the regulation of these processes in response to environmental factors with an emphasis on the relationship between structure and function from the molecular to the whole-plant level. The course will provide the basis to understand how plants sense and respond to changing environmental conditions. This will enable students to understand why rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and global climate warming impact photosynthesis, plant metabolism and ultimately whole plant and ecosystem performance. Concepts discussed during lectures will be demonstrated in a series of practical labs.

Prerequisites: BIO203H5 or BIO204H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/27P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO313H5 • Methods and Experimental Design in Ecology

This course will provide Biology Majors and Specialists particularly interested in ecology with integrated, practical exposure to field and laboratory research methods on plant, animal, and microbial communities including study design, data collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 or BIO259H5 or STA215H5 or PSY201H5 or equivalent.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO314H5 • Laboratory in Cell and Molecular Biology

Students are introduced to commonly employed techniques in cell biology such as cellular fractionation, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blotting, and immunolocalization. Students will also perform some advanced molecular biology techniques including the cloning and transformation of genes, DNA sequencing and the expression of proteins in bacterial and/or model systems. Each week, a two-hour lecture provides an introduction and theoretical basis for the lab.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO315H5 • Human Cell Biology

This course uses the information learned in prerequisite courses to cover advanced details in specific areas. The course will also introduce students to many exciting new topics in the structure and function of normal and diseased cells. Areas of focus include cell adhesion, intercellular communication, signal transduction, the cytoskeleton, chemotaxis, motor proteins, receptor mediated endocytosis and intracellular trafficking with an eye towards understanding their underlying roles in the disease process. Throughout the course, students will learn about the underlying approaches, methods and experimentation used by biomedical researchers including polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blotting, immunolocalization, pharmacological intervention and various means of localizing proteins within cells.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO318Y5 • Animal Behaviour

This course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals behave in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success in survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental, and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses) for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published scientific paper.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Exclusions: BIO328H5 or PSY252H5 or PSY352H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L/72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO320H5 • Sensory and Cognitive Ecology

The acquisition and transduction of environmental information will be explored in the context of decision making and adaptive behaviour. This course will focus on the form and function of visual, auditory, tactile, and chemical senses and signals, and animal communication writ large. Post-acquisition, cognitive processes concerned with learning and memory will also be discussed. A comparative approach will be taken throughout to examine the ways that different animals and animal groups rely on different sources of information and a diverse variety of sensory and cognitive mechanisms. All topics will be covered in the context of species-specific ecology and evolution.

Prerequisites: BIO202H5 and BIO205H5
Exclusions: PSY362H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/10T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO324H5 • Plant Biochemistry

This course examines plants as the biochemical motors and sustainers of life on earth. The major pathways of plant metabolism are surveyed to provide students with an integrated model of plant cells as autonomous biochemical networks. This course further emphasizes the specialized metabolism of economically significant plant species, the biosynthesis of pharmacologically and agriculturally important metabolites, and the role of biotechnology in engineering exotic plant metabolism in industrial settings.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and CHM120H5 or permission of instructor
Exclusions: CSB475H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO312H5 and CHM242H5 and CHM362H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO325H5 • Biomechanics

From the form of an organism one can read its evolutionary history. This course addresses the use of organ systems to find and process food, escape enemies by locomotion, reproduce by pollination vectors, filter nutrients, exchange gases, coordinate and make decisions. Content includes the mechanics of moving in fluids by swimming and flying, sending and receiving of signals at body surfaces, the microstructure of materials. Forces are seen to have adaptively affected the shape and leverage of skeletons.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO326H5 • Ornithology

Ecology, evolution, form, function, diversity, and conservation of birds. Practical sessions focus on observation and assessment of local avian populations using field ornithology techniques and approaches.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and BIO205H5
Exclusions: EEB386H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO202H5

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO328H5 • Lectures in Animal Behaviour

This course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals behave in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success in survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental, and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses) for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published scientific paper. No laboratory or field work is included. Note: This is a half-credit (0.5) course that is offered over the full academic year.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Exclusions: BIO318Y5 or PSY252H5 or PSY352H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO329H5 • Conservation Biology

Conservation of biodiversity, from genes to ecosystems. Topics include identifying biodiversity across levels of organization; understanding major threats to biodiversity (land use change, climate change, overharvesting); evaluating conservation actions (protected areas, reintroductions, assisted migration, restoration); and ethical considerations pertaining to conservation practices.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and BIO259H5
Exclusions: BIOC63H3 or EEB215H1 or EEB255H1 or EEB365H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO330H5 • Plant Ecology

A survey of the population and community ecology of plants. Topics include resource acquisition, growth and reproduction, mutualisms, competition, defence, invasions, disturbance, population dynamics, and community structure. Interactions with other plants, diseases, and animals particularly are emphasized.

Prerequisites: (BIO203H5 or BIO204H5) and BIO205H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO331H5 • Ecology of Communities

This course will cover the theoretical foundations of community ecology, including the role of species interactions and environment structure on patterns of diversity and implications of community ecology in conservation. It will provide practical experience working with tools used to analyze community structure. Discussion and evaluation of the primary literature is a key component of this course. Students will also complete written assignments.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and (BIO259H5 or BIO360H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO332H5 • Biology Field Research

A two-week Biology field research experience offered in one of the summer terms. The location, subject of the research, and instructor will change according to a regular cycle. Details will be made available on the Department of Biology website well in advance of a change to location. Please note that this course can only be completed once. There will be additional costs for travel and accommodation.

Prerequisites: 6.0 credits and current registration in a Biology, Ecology, Environment/Geography or Earth Science program and permission of the instructor. Appropriate upper level BIO prerequisite core course requirements will be posted on the Biology department website. Any additional unique prerequisites for the course will be posted one year in advance of the move to a new location or with a change of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: STA215H5 or equivalent 200-level STA course

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/80P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO333H5 • Freshwater Ecology

A functional analysis of freshwater ecosystems, with emphasis on lakes. Lectures cover water chemistry; the physical structure of lakes; the different ways that algae, zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish have evolved to succeed in these habitats and interact with one another; and the impact of humans on freshwater systems. Students must be available to participate in a 1-day field trip to visit aquatic habitats further from campus on a weekend in either late September or early October. Students not available for a 1-day weekend trip should not register for this course. Ancillary fees for the course apply. Please check the Departmental website for full details.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and CHM110H5 and CHM120H5
Exclusions: BIO332Y5 or BIO337H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/32P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO335H5 • Mycology

A study of the biology of fungi with emphasis on their life histories, morphology, classification, ecology and significance to man. Laboratory sessions include the collection, culture, and identification of a wide variety of fungi. In addition, several experiments illustrating important aspects of fungal physiology and development are performed in the laboratory.

Prerequisites: (BIO152H5 and BIO153H5) or any 200 level course in BIO.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO339H5 • Plant Identification and Systematics

Lectures provide an introduction to principles and underlying philosophy of plant classification, phylogenetic reconstructions, flowering plant, evolution, phylogeny, pollination, breeding systems, and speciation in plants. Laboratories focus on gaining proficiency in recognizing important plant families by sight and identifying unknown plants by using keys and published Floras.

Prerequisites: (BIO203H5 or BIO204H5) plus 0.5 credit from BIO205H5 and BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: EEB337H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO341H5 • Advanced Genetics

The following topics are covered at an advanced level: extensions to Mendelian genetics, linkage and advanced mapping analyses, mutation, extrachromosomal inheritance, quantitative genetics, population and evolutionary genetics and genetics of behaviour.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO342H5 • Evolutionary Biology

An introduction to the concepts and importance of evolutionary biology. The course will focus on how genetic variation arises and is maintained, mechanisms of evolutionary change and how these mechanisms lead to adaptation, sexual selection, speciation and co-evolution. Throughout the course we will consider how fossils, experiments, genetics and molecular systematics can be used to understand evolution.

Prerequisites: BIO207H5
Recommended Preparation: (BIO259H5 or BIO360H5 or STA215H5) (strongly recommended)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO347H5 • Epigenetics

Epigenetic phenomena play key roles in environmental interactions, development, and in disease. Underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate chromatin structure and gene expression are explored, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, or non-coding RNAs. Examples focus predominantly on eukaryotes (e.g. plants, insects, humans) and highlight how epigenetic marks are set, maintained, and involved in shaping phenotypic outcomes. The course will also enable students to apply knowledge and basic principles to recent scientific literature in this dynamic field.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: BIOD19H3 or CSB458H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO202H5 and BIO203H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO353H5 • Plant Development

The course addresses key concepts, with emphasis on unique plant-related aspects. Integrates plant development at the levels of the cell, tissue, organ and organism, with knowledge from diverse fields of Biology. Topics will include embryology, environmental interactions, signaling, developmental transitions, developmental diversity, evolution and development, and tools for discovery research.

Prerequisites: BIO203H5
Exclusions: CSB340H51
Recommended Preparation: None

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/10T/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO354H5 • Vertebrate Form and Function

The design and adaptive consequences of vertebrate structure. Mechanisms of locomotion, digestion, gas exchange, circulation and sensory perception are compared at the organ level. Students conduct individual laboratory dissections on selected vertebrates.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and [(BIO208H5 and BIO209H5) or BIO210Y5]

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO356H5 • Major Features of Vertebrate Evolution

The evolution of the vertebrates as evidenced by the fossil record. The origin and adaptive radiation of major groups including amphibians and reptiles is emphasized. Principles and knowledge will be demonstrated through written assignments and essays.

Prerequisites: (BIO208H5 and BIO209H5) or BIO210Y5Y

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO360H5 • Biometrics I

This course takes students from hypothesis testing to the application of testing means, chi-square tests, regression analysis and analysis of variance in Biology. Students will learn to choose an appropriate statistical test, independently analyze case studies with R software, and write empirical scientific reports.

Prerequisites: BIO259H5 or STA215H5 *STA215H5 will no longer be accepted as an appropriate prerequisite course AFTER 2022-2023 Academic year. Beginning 2023-2024 Academic year all students will be required to complete BIO259H5 as the statistics prerequisite course.
Exclusions: ECO220Y5 or PSY202H5 or STA221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO361H5 • Biometrics II

This course is a sequel to BIO360H5 in which topics in biological statistics are explored at an advanced level. Multiple regression, concepts of power, multi-factor analysis of variance, advanced experimental designs, logistic regression, Monte Carlo techniques, generalized linear models and principal component analyses are explored using R software.

Prerequisites: BIO360H5
Exclusions: ECO220Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO362H5 • Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics uses and develops computational tools to understand biological processes from the level of single molecules to whole genomes and organisms. The biotechnology revolution has meant that bioinformatics is now used in many cutting edge biological research areas from medicine to phylogenetics. This course will introduce core concepts, practices and research topics including DNA/Protein alignment, DNA sequence analysis, interacting with scientific databases, and genome sequencing technology. This course includes computer-based practicals wherein students will apply bioinformatic tools and be introduced to basic computer programming - no previous experience is required.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO368H5 • Medicinal Plants and Human Health

This botanical survey of medicinal plants integrates phytochemistry, ethnobotany, herbalism, pharmacology, and the molecular basis of human disease. It examines traditional herbal medicine and modern phytochemical research as sources of plant-based drugs used in the treatment of disease. The biosynthesis of therapeutic plant compounds and their mechanisms of action in the human body are emphasized. Students will critically examine and debate claims made in the health, herbal, and supplement literature.

Prerequisites: BIO203H5 and BIO206H5
Exclusions: NFS400H1
Recommended Preparation: CHM242H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO370Y5 • Microbiology

This course will include an in-depth exploration of microbial structure and ultrastructure; growth and cultivation; metabolism; microbial diversity and genetics; virology; pathogenicity and immunology; and the role of microorganisms in medicine and the environment. This lecture material will be accompanied by a weekly laboratory component where students learn about the latest experimental approaches in microbiology.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: BIO371H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L/72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO371H5 • Microbiology Lectures

In-depth discussion of bacterial structure and ultrastructure; physiology and nutrition; growth and cultivation; nature of viruses (bacteriophage and a limited survey of animal viruses and their properties); microbial genetics; immunology; the role of micro-organisms in medicine, industry, agriculture and ecology.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: BIO370Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO372H5 • Molecular Biology

This course provides an overview of the field of molecular biology, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, genome structure, chromatin regulation, transcription cycle, RNA splicing, translation, and genetic code. The course will enable students to learn the fundamental concepts of molecular biology and master critical thinking and problem-solving in the field of molecular biology.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5 and CHM242H5
Exclusions: JBC372H5 or CHM360Y5 or JLM349H1 or MGB311Y1
Recommended Preparation: CHM361H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO373H5 • Environmental Microbiology

A lecture course on the interaction of microorganisms with other organisms and their environment. As the most abundant form of life, microorganisms have an enormous impact on the Earth. Subject areas include microbial evolution and biodiversity, metabolism and biogeochemical cycling, and how molecular biology has revolutionized our understanding of microbial life.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and BIO206H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO374H5 • Modern Biotechnology

This course is designed to introduce students to biotechnology and its applications in a variety of fields, including medicine, food & beverage, agriculture, forensics, fisheries and environmental protection. The course explores the principles and methods of genetic, tissue and organismal engineering involving species from bacteria to humans. The social and ethical issues associated with biotechnologies such as GMOs, stem cells and cloning will also be discussed. Topics include: Recombinant DNA Technology, Genomics & Bioinformatics, Protein Technology, Microbial Biotechnology, Plant Biotechnology, Animal Biotechnology, Forensic Biotechnology, Environmental Biotechnology, Aquatic Biotechnology, Medical Biotechnology, Biotechnology Regulations, and Careers in Biotechnology.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

BIO375H5 • Introductory Medical Biotechnology

This course reviews a full range of discoveries from medical biotechnology, which includes drugs, smart phone apps, and medical devices. The course reviews a range of biotechnology products with respect to: regulatory path for experiments to support for new biotechnologies; key science concepts behind the technology, patents, and the business context.

Prerequisites: Completion of 2.0 credits in Biology, plus (BIO259H5 or BIO360H5 or STA215H5 or STA220H5 or PSY201H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

BIO376H5 • Marine Ecology

This course addresses the diversity of marine life, and the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in marine ecosystems. Students will explore current methods and theories in marine ecology and consider the societal importance of marine resources with a special emphasis on Canada's coasts.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and BIO205H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO378H5 • The Biology of Marine Mammals: evolution, physiology, ecology and conservation

This course provides an introduction to the biological study of marine mammals and their populations. It explores the evolution of marine mammals, their adaptations to aquatic environments, as well as their population and behavioural ecology. The course also investigates threats to marine mammal populations and their national and global conservation.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and BIO202H5 and BIO205H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO380H5 • Human Development

Reproduction and embryonic development in humans are emphasized. After a general review of human reproduction, the formation of sperm and eggs is analyzed, followed by an in-depth analysis of fertilization in vivo and in vitro. Early embryonic developmental processes are studied with a view to how the embryo becomes organized so that all of the tissues and organs of the adult body form in the right places at the proper times. The course ends with an in-depth analysis of limb development and organ regeneration. The relevance of the material to such topics as human infertility, contraception, cloning, biotechnology and disease is continually addressed.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5 or BIO315H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides third year undergraduate students (after completion of at least 9.5 but not more than 14 credits), who have developed some knowledge of Biology and its research methods, another opportunity to work in the research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled have the opportunity to become involved in original research, enhance their research skills and share in the excitement of acquiring new knowledge and in the discovery process of science. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO400Y5 • Biology Internship

Through a part-time, unpaid, 200-hour work placement, fourth year students apply biology content and skills. Placements are made throughout the GTA in both the private (e.g. pharmaceutical or biotech companies) or public (e.g. Peel Region Medical Office, hospitals, Great Lakes Laboratory) sector. Biweekly class meetings plus year-end report and presentation are required. Students in a biology specialist program are given priority. Updated application information will be on-line at www.utm.utoronto.ca/intern by February 1st of each year. Please see the Internship Office (DV 3201D) for more information.

Prerequisites: Fourth year standing in Biology Specialist or Major Program, 3.0 CGPA and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may not have concurrent enrolment in any other internship, research, or ROP course.

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO403H5 • Developmental Neurobiology

An advanced student-led course examining contemporary topics in neurobiology. Students will read, criticize, and present on current areas of neurobiology, which could include the cell and molecular basis for neural disease, developmental neurobiology, sensory reception, neurophysiology, neural communication, and information processing.

Prerequisites: BIO304H5
Exclusions: BIO483H5 (Winter 2021)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO404H5 • Invertebrate Neurobiology

Neurobiology, the biological study of the nervous system, investigates the electrical and chemical processes animals use to regulate internal events and interface with their environments. Invertebrates have provided crucial neurobiological insights and are often more accessible study systems than vertebrates. This course addresses some key historical contributions, and discusses the future of invertebrate systems, where recent technological advances are opening up new ways to explore invertebrate neurobiology and evolution. Students will do practicals, using computer simulations of neurons, to develop an understanding of neurons and other excitable cells.

Prerequisites: BIO304H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO405H5 • Evolutionary Perspectives on Behaviour

Areas of focus may change from year to year. Each year, advanced topics considered will fall under one of more of the research areas of behavioural ecology, cognitive ecology, evolutionary neuroscience, and/or neuroethology and use as examples a variety of animals, sometimes including humans, and atypical model systems.

Prerequisites: BIO304H5
Exclusions: PSY362H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO406H5 • Current Topics in Ecology and Evolution

A combination of lectures and tutorials. The course will emphasize group discussion and critiques of current publications in the field. The theme of the course is expected to be topical and current and to vary from year to year, with the interests of the faculty member(s) teaching the course. Course themes are expected to range from structure and function of whole ecosystems (e.g. the collapse of fisheries) to evolutionary ecology (e.g. the evolution of emergent diseases).

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and (BIO259H5 or STA215H5 or BIO360H5) *STA215H5 will no longer be accepted as an appropriate prerequisite course AFTER the 2022-2023 Academic year. Beginning in the 2023-2024 Academic year all students will be required to complete BIO259H5 or BIO360H5 as the statistics prerequisite course.
Recommended Preparation: BIO313H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO407H5 • Behaviour Genetics

State of the art techniques used in the genetic, molecular, statistical and neurobiological analysis of behaviour are discussed. We focus on behaviour-genetic analysis of olfaction, foraging, rhythms and sex in three model systems (the worm C. elegans, the fruit fly D. melanogaster and the mouse). We discuss how information from these model organisms can be used to shed light on behaviour genetics of non-model organisms including humans.

Prerequisites: BIO207H5 and BIO318Y5 and (BIO259H5 or BIO360H5 or STA215H5) *STA215H5 will no longer be accepted as an appropriate prerequisite course AFTER 2022-2023 Academic year. Beginning 2023-2024 Academic year all students will be required to complete BIO259H5 or BIO360H5 as the statistics prerequisite course.
Recommended Preparation: BIO206H5 and BIO215H5 and BIO304H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO408H5 • Neural Circuit Structure and Function

This course covers contemporary topics in systems neuroscience, focusing on the relationship between the circuit structure and function of mammalian brains. We review the current understanding of topics concerning signal transduction and the peripheral circuits, information processing in the central nerve system, neuronal cell types and connectivity, development and critical period plasticity of sensory cortices, and motor control. Students present and critique the latest research progress on these issues.

Prerequisites: BIO202H5 or BIO304H5 or Permission of Instructor.
Exclusions: BIO483H5 Winter 2019

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO409H5 • Laboratory in Animal Physiology

Experiments are designed to familiarize students with techniques and experimental design commonly used in the study of physiology. A one-hour lecture each week provides an experimental and theoretical basis for each laboratory. Topics include pharmacology, enzyme kinetics, neurophysiology, respiration, and metabolic rate.

Prerequisites: BIO304H5 and (BIO202H5 or BIO204H5 or BIO310H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO410H5 • Insect Physiology

A lecture course with a seminar component designed to introduce the student to the physiological characteristics of insects. The physiology of the integument, metamorphosis, reproduction, diapause and the physiological basis of insect control are discussed in detail.

Prerequisites: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO411H5 • Topics in Molecular and Cellular Physiology

An advanced, student-led seminar course on contemporary subjects in cell physiology. Students will examine, review, criticize and present primary literature on fundamental topics such as ion transport, water transport, membrane excitability, intracellular transport, and secretion applied to a variety of physiological systems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how diverse cell types carry out specific physiological functions.

Prerequisites: BIO315H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO314H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO412H5 • Climate Change Biology

Climate change is affecting life on earth at all levels from cells to ecosystems. As a result, shifts in the distribution of species, the timing of biological events, and large impacts on natural resources, agriculture, and forestry may be seen. This course explores past climate, predictions of future climate, impacts of climate change on biological systems, and potentials for adaptation. Mitigation of climate change impacts on biological systems will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and (BIO202H5 or BIO203H5) and (GGR377H5 or BIO312H5 or BIO330H5 or BIO331H5 or BIO333H5)
Recommended Preparation: BIO313H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO414H5 • Advanced Integrative Physiology

The integration of cardiovascular, renal, respiratory and muscle physiology will be examined with a problem-based approach. The response of these systems to challenges such as altitude, depth under water, and exercise will be examined. Laboratory activities will give students hands on experience measuring physiological variables of these systems with primarily human subjects, while other examples will be used to examine the diversity of response to environmental challenges throughout the animal kingdom.

Prerequisites: BIO304H5 and BIO310H5
Exclusions: HMB472H1or KPE360H1 or KPE462H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO416H5 • Field Course in Ecology

Students may choose from a variety of field courses offered through a cooperative arrangement among ecologists at ten Ontario universities. Courses involve a two-week period at a field site in early May or late August, and require a major paper or project report be submitted within six weeks of course completion. A fee for room and board is usually charged over and above tuition. Lists of courses available are posted at http://www.oupfb.ca/info.html   Please check this link in January for application dates. Information can also be found on the UTM Biology website. 



Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO417H5 • Molecular and Structural Genomics

Genetic information shapes almost all aspects of life. How is this information organized and inherited? How does it influence individuals and how does help to understand disease? The course explores the structure and function of chromatin i.e. the management of biological information. We will explore how the genome is packaged, expressed, replicated and repaired. We will look into chromosome sets and inheritance, accessibility of the genome to the molecular machinery, DNA repair, and modern techniques in research and diagnostics.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: BIO484H5 (Winter 2020)
Recommended Preparation: BIO347H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO419H5 • Molecular Aspects of Gene Regulation

Gene expression is regulated during development in multicellular organisms. The study of gene regulation is tightly linked to our understanding of cell types and functions. This course provides an overview of the molecular aspects of gene expression, including transcription, regulatory RNAs, chromatin regulation, and genomic regulation. Students will read, critique, and present recently published research articles on gene regulation in eukaryotes.

Prerequisites: (BIO207H5 and BIO372H5) or permission of instructor
Exclusions: BIO484H5 (Fall 2018) or MGY420H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO422H5 • Environmental Epigenetics

Organisms show a remarkable plasticity that allows them to grow and survive in an ever-changing environment. Epigenetic mechanisms provide a fascinating layer of regulation that integrates the genome and environment. In addition, epigenetic marks can contribute to lasting effects across generations without changes in the underlying DNA sequence. This course explores how plant and animal epigenomes respond to change such as stresses or developmental transitions. Influences on genome function, phenotype, and how epigenetic marks are transmitted will be discussed interactively drawing on recent primary literature and modern technological advances.

Prerequisites: BIO312H5 and BIO347H5
Exclusions: BIOD19H3
Recommended Preparation: BIO341H5 and BIO372H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO424H5 • Movement Ecology

Individuals move throughout their lifecycle. They find a home, escape predation, and search for food and mates. We will explore the patterns and causes of different movement types and their eco-evolutionary consequences, from the individual level, up to the whole ecosystem. Examples will come from both terrestrial and aquatic realms.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and (BIO259H5 or STA215H5)
Recommended Preparation: BIO342H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO427H5 • Data Science in Biology

Biology has become a data-driven science with the arrival of complex datasets. Extracting information from these large-scale experiments requires approaches that unify statistics and computer science. The course will focus on strengthening mathematical intuition on core topics such as hypothesis testing and statistical models while connecting these to machine learning.

Prerequisites: BIO360H5
Exclusions: BIO429H5 or CSC311H1 or CSC311H5 or CSC413H1 or CSC413H5 or CSCC11H3 or STA314H1 or STA314H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO361H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO429H5 • Data analysis in Neurobiology

This course explains the fundamental principles of biological data analysis by focusing on neuroscience datasets. Students will learn methods for sampling data, testing hypotheses, multiple linear regression, PCA, clustering through both lectures and practical exercises. These methods will be discussed in the context of current research in understanding brain functions.

Prerequisites: BIO360H5 or permission of instructor
Exclusions: BIO427H5 or CSC311H1 or CSC311H5 or CSC413H1 or CSC413H5 or CSCC11H3 or STA314H1 or STA314H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO434H5 • Social and Developmental Determinants of Human Health

This course encourages students to explore the relationship between social conditions and health outcomes. Topics may vary across years. Topics include the importance of the early years, interactions between the environment and the genes, epigenetic influences on health, sensitive periods of development, the influence of nutrition on health, the interaction between social policy, medical care, social class and human health. The students direct the learning experience in groups as they engage in case-based and problem-based learning. Note: Students interested in this course must contact the Biology Undergraduate Advisor to enroll.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO443H5 • Phylogenetic Principles

Lectures will provide an in-depth coverage of modern methods of phylogenetic reconstruction including molecular systematics based on DNA sequences. The principles and philosophy of classification will be taught with an emphasis on 'tree-thinking', one of the most important conceptual advances in evolutionary biology. Tutorials will focus on recent developments in the study of evolutionary patterns while gaining proficiency in reading, presenting, and critiquing scientific papers.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: EEB462H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO259H5 or BIO314H5 or BIO360H5 or STA215H5 or PSY201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO444H5 • Urban Field Ecology and Evolution

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of urban ecology and evolution using the Greater Toronto Area as a model to study the topic. The course will focus on understanding how ecological and evolutionary processes are influenced by urban development, human behaviour, and the built environment, and how the environment can feed back to shape cities and socio-ecology, including human behaviour and well-being. Students will be introduced to principles of the scientific process including making observations, stating hypotheses, experimental design, conducting experiments, data collection, statistical analysis and interpretation, and scientific writing and oral presentations. The course will focus on all major habitats in urban areas to understand how urban environmental change of air, water and land influence the ecology and evolution of populations, communities and ecosystems.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and (BIO205H5 or BIO342H5) and (BIO259H5 or STA215H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 14L/98P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO445H5 • Evolutionary Ecology

This course focuses on the interface between ecology and evolution. Research has shown that biotic and abiotic ecological factors drive evolution, and in turn, evolution feeds back to influence the ecological processes and patterns of populations and communities. Throughout this course we will focus on this dynamic interplay over short and long time spans in animals, plants, fungi, and other microbes. While covering the concepts and questions of this field we will also consider the theory, methods, and statistics used to bring new insights to evolutionary ecology. Students will be expected to participate in discussions, present methods and concepts to the class, and complete written assignments.

Prerequisites: BIO342H5
Exclusions: EEB324H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO458H5 • Genomics

The genome has been referred to as the blueprint of life and consists of the full complement of genes and genetic material carried by an organism. The ongoing revolution in DNA sequencing allows biologists to observe the variety of genetic and genomic structures that underpin the diversity of life. In addition, applications of genomic technologies have facilitated new fields of research such as personalized medicine and evolutionary genomics. The lectures will focus on the diversity of genomic structures, their functions and evolutionary origins. The course also has computer-based practicals that provide hands-on training with cutting-edge bioinformatic tools for analysis of genome-scale datasets and next generation sequencing data.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5 and (BIO362H5 or CSC108H5) and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO464H5 • Conservation and Biodiversity

Biodiversity is the sum of species diversity, and also the interaction of species at population, at ecosystem and at migration-route levels; it is one barometer of environmental health. Conservation biology applies ecological and genetic principles to the problem of declining biodiversity. We discuss the species concept, quantification and cost-benefit analysis of biodiversity and extinction, causes, consequence, diagnosis and treatment of population declines, as well as the effects of different land uses on biodiversity and reserve design. A key part of this course is a case study by each student. Note: Students from a wide range of programs are encouraged to enrol.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and BIO205H5 and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO475H5 • Virology

Virology examines the biology of viruses infecting all forms of life including humans and other animals, plants, eukaryotic microorganisms, and bacteria. The scope ranges from the molecular biology of virus replication to virus evolution and ecology. Current issues surrounding virology and society are incorporated into the course including vaccines, emerging viruses, and even consideration of practical applications of viruses.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5
Exclusions: CSB351Y1
Recommended Preparation: BIO370Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO476H5 • Molecular Basis of Disease

This advanced course explores the primary concepts of pathogenesis and investigates current research in the field of molecular pathology. Specific disease topics include inflammation, injury and repair, neoplasia, immune disorders, infectious disease, cardiovascular disease, and toxicology. Analysis of the primary literature is a key component of this course.

Prerequisites: BIO310H5 and BIO315H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO341H5 and BIO372H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO477H5 • The Human Genome and Cancer Biology

The first part of the course examines the structure and molecular biology of the human genome. Topics will include: the sequencing of the human genome; variation between genomes; and various aspects of functional genomics such as a brief overview of how gene expression is regulated and how genomics is being utilized in health and medicine. Techniques such as high throughput sequencing will be covered. The second part of the course examines the molecular and genetic basis of cancer including the role of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cell cycle regulating proteins in the development of this disease. It also looks at cancer from a functional genomics perspective. Lectures and seminars involve presentations and discussion of recently published research articles.

Prerequisites: (BIO370Y5 or BIO372H5) and permission of instructor
Exclusions: MGY470H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO314H5 and BIO315H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO481Y5 • Biology Research Project

Students in this course will conduct a research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Biology. The course is open to third and fourth year students. Students learn how to design, carry out, and evaluate the results of a research project. Students are required to write and present a research proposal, write a term paper, and present a seminar on the results of their research project. All students interested in a research project must approach potential faculty supervisors several months in advance of the beginning of term. Students must obtain permission from the faculty member whom they would like to serve as their project supervisor. Students must meet with the course coordinator periodically throughout the academic year.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may not have concurrent enrolment in this course and in any other internship, research, or ROP course.

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO483H5 • Selected Topics in Biology I

The focus of this advanced course will reflect the expertise and research of the Instructor. Students will actively participate in the discussion, criticism and interpretations of recent scientific papers. Implications and applications of these research advances will be explored. Current year's topic will be listed on the Biology department website. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200 and/or 300 level prerequisites core course requirement(s) will be posted on the Biology departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO484H5 • Selected Topics in Biology II

The focus of this advanced course will reflect the expertise and research of the Instructor. Students will actively participate in the discussion, criticism and interpretations of recent scientific papers. Implications and applications of these research advances will be explored. Current year's topic will be listed on the Biology department website. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200 and/or 300 level prerequisites core course requirement(s) will be posted on the Biology departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CBJ481Y5 • Independent Project in Bioinformatics

This course is intended for students in the Bioinformatics Specialist degree program. Possible areas in which the research may take place include: functional genomics (e.g., microarray and proteomic data analysis); systems biology; and the development of novel analytical methods for large datasets. Students will be required to produce a written document of their project and present it orally. In order to enrol in this course, students must obtain, several months in advance, approval from a faculty member(s) who will serve as supervisor(s).

Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Corequisites: BIO477H5
Recommended Preparation: CSC343H5 and BIO372H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT109H5 • Contemporary Communication Technologies

This course examines different information and communication technologies (ICTs) through the analysis of such genres as contemporary written, visual, oral, electronic and musical forms. It illustrates a range of theoretical perspectives that seek to explain the relationship between communication and technology. This course will also examine, briefly, the history of ICTs.


Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/11P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT110H5 • Rhetoric and Media

This course critically examines the written, visual, aural, and dynamic rhetoric as it pertains to communications for academic and other purposes across a range of digital and interactive media discourses.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/11T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT111H5 • Critical Coding

This experiential learning course introduces students to the practice and theory of coding, programming, and basic development of user-oriented software. The lectures illustrate a core range of software development concepts that provide the foundations needed for the practical coding of front-end applications such as mobile interfaces or of back-end software such as introductory artificial intelligence or social media analysis. The practicals are lab-based and focus on applying these theoretical skills to solving problems grounded in a critical understanding of the interaction between people, culture, and society, by developing software or apps in languages such as Java, Objective C, Swift, Python.

Corequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT112H5 • Foundations of Management

This course introduces students to the foundational principles and analytical tools from the management discipline in link with today’s economic and technological advancements. Particular emphasis is given to the interconnections between information and communications technologies, innovation, the role of managers and their decision-making processes, and related social, cultural, and economic institutions.


Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT200H5 • Race, Media and Culture

This course provides an introduction to the intersecting fields of critical race, media, and cultural studies. We will pay particular attention to dynamics of social difference and power and the communication strategies and technologies through which these are navigated, reproduced and interrupted. Students will be introduced to critical and analytical tools for understanding the cultural and media circulation, regulation and reimagination of things like race, sexuality, time, gender, class, indigeneity, space, ethnicity, ability and nationality. These critical tools equip students with the skills to write, design and build ethical innovations in new media and culture.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/11T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT202H5 • Human-Machine Communication

From voice responsive cars and virtual assistants to social robots and smart toys, people are increasingly interacting with communicative technologies in their daily lives. In this course students will consider the implications of this evolution in communication practice – informing design, ethics, efficacy, privacy, and other implications. Human-machine communication is a specific area of study within communication encompassing human-computer interaction, human-robot interaction, and human-agent interaction.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT203H5 • Business Research Methods

This course provides an introduction to research design, conduct, and analysis for making informed business decisions. The course will focus on basic methodologies, qualitative and quantitative methods, data sources, reliability, validity, and other measurement issues, data collection and research design, ethics in research, and report writing and presentation.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5
Exclusions: CCT208H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT204H5 • Design Thinking I

An introduction to the basic concepts and skills of design thinking as an interdisciplinary subject. Emphasizes creative and critical thinking in the design process; provides the student with the theory and operational skills necessary to solve design problems in the realms of symbolic and visual communication, material objects, environments, and organized services and activities.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT205H5 • Digital Innovation and Cultural Transformation

This course examines a range of theoretical perspectives and worldviews that assess the cultural and social changes brought about by modern technology. These perspectives will be used to analyze the potential problems initiated by the introduction of digital and computing technologies to various contexts. Possible topics include: cybernetics; media convergence; artificial intelligence/life; smart technology; digital environmentalism and digital warfare.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT206H5 • Law, Technology and Culture

This course will provide a detailed review of copyright, trademark and patent law with a special emphasis on how they apply to digital media. This course will also review the law of contract as it applies to digital industries and investigate the relevant tort law. In addition, other regulatory issues will be discussed such as telecommunications and broadcasting law both from a Canadian and an international perspective.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/11T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT208H5 • Communications Research Methods

This course is a survey of research methodologies in the field of communication and media. A central goal of the course is to train students how to critically assess methods commonly used in social science research. Students will also become familiar with how to properly collect and interpret quantitative and qualitative social science research data.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5
Exclusions: CCT203H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/8T
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT210H5 • Signs, Referents, and Meaning

How written or spoken statements, gestures, and aesthetic objects come to have meanings. How we recognize and fail to recognize such meanings. The nature, systems, and processes of interpretation. The role of mental models.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5
Exclusions: CCT213H5 or VIC223YI

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/11T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT211H5 • Fundamentals of User Interface Programming

This experiential learning course introduces students to the practice and theory of coding, programming, and development of user interfaces. The lectures illustrate an advanced range of software development concepts needed for the practical coding of user interfaces across a variety of devices. The practicals are lab-based and focus on applying these theoretical skills to design, implementation, and testing of user interface software components. Students will have the opportunity to acquire project management and software engineering skills Scrum, Agile), programming languages (Java, Javascript, Objective C, Swift, and other mobile and web programming languages), and evaluation methodologies (unit testing, bug tracking).

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5 and CCT111H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT212H5 • Coding Cultures

This course introduces students to the critical study of computing and its interaction with culture and society. It examines how relations between humans and technology create different kinds of technocultures. Students will explore contemporary technologies from both a technical and cultural/historical point of view, focusing on the labour of coding, the materiality of software code, the role of intellectual property, and the cultures that sustain and arise from digital media production.


Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT218H5 • Foundations of Media and Technology Studies

An introduction to foundational theories for studying the relationship between media, technology and society. The course presents technology as a social practice and considers a wide variety of concepts and methods for studying its cultural and political significance.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/11T
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT219H5 • Media Economics I

This course presents economic principles that explain how markets help organize exchange and production among competing but nevertheless cooperating economic units. Theories of consumer demand, the economic nature and function of business firms, optimal business decision rules of monopoly, oligopoly, and anti-combines regulations, as well as game theory, are presented. Efficiency criteria pertaining to the operation of firms and markets, the role of property rights, and the scope for public policy, are also examined.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5 and CCT112H5
Exclusions: CCT319H5 or ECO100Y5 or (ECO101H5 or ECO102H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT221H5 • Digital Marketing I

Techniques for developing a comprehensive marketing strategy will be developed with particular emphasis on digital products and services. The nature of digital markets, approaches to advertising, pricing and such areas as versioning will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5 and (CCT111H5 or CCT112H5)
Exclusions: CCT322H5 or MGT252H5 or MGT352H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT222H5 • Political Economy of Communication, Culture, and Technology

The course analyzes the relationship between media systems, communication technologies, and power. As an introduction to a political economy approach, this course surveys how media, culture, information and technologies are produced, circulated, and consumed, with attention to both historical developments and contemporary practices in the digital era. The course provides a basic understanding of media systems, technologies, and culture production in relation to the market, the state, and civil society. Students will develop a basic understanding of the political, economic, cultural, and regulatory environment in which media, culture, and technologies are produced, and pay particular attention to the implications of processes such as globalization, digitization, marketization, and commodification for social life.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT224H5 • Organizational Studies I

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the activities and processes that take place in organizations. Major emphasis is placed on the investigation of the varied measures that can be developed to assess and subsequently improve the performance of the organization. The interpretation of measures in managerial decision-making will also be investigated in detail.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT225H5 • Information Systems

This course has been designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the role of computers and communication systems in modern organizations. Unlike programming courses, the focus here is on the application of computer-based systems to support information requirements for problem solving and managerial decision-making. Topics include concepts of information, humans as information processors, survey of hardware and software applications, introduction to information systems analysis and design.

Prerequisites: CCT224H5
Exclusions: MGM371H5 or MGT371H5 or RSM327H1 or MGAC70H3

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT226H5 • Data Analysis I

This course introduces students to the basic tools of data analysis, most particularly statistics and modeling. Students are introduced to basic principles of descriptive and inferential statistics with a focus on the types of data that they will typically encounter in a digital environment.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5 and (CCT111H5 or CCT112H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT250H5 • Foundations of Digital Design and Production

Advances in technology have provided users ready access to empowering technologies enabling creative and enterprise digital production. This course provides hands-on skills on critical design and production suites and platforms used across industries and disciplines, centred on the development of industry-standard creative design.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT260H5 • Web Development and Design I

This course will explore foundational techniques of web development and design in the context of human-centred technologies, and design of experiences, interfaces and interactions. Topics include development of semantic web properties using contemporary programming techniques; standards-based design of responsive accessible systems; and production of rich media for online displays.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT261H5 • Speculative Design I

This introductory course in information architecture is a foundation of user interface design. Information architects work in organizations to design interfaces that enable users to find and navigate complex data via technology. Using architectural and design concepts to create and organize user-friendly information structures, this course includes exploring theories and hands-on practice with information organization, structure, categorization, representation, navigation and modeling.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT270H5 • Principles in Game Design

This course will address the principles and methodologies behind the rules and play of games. It will foster a solid understanding of how games function to create experiences, including rule design, play mechanics, game balancing and the integration of visual, tactile, audio, and textual components into games.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and (CCT110H5 or ENG110H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT273H5 • Professional Practice and Communication

This professional practice course provides students with basic skills in professional communication, acumen, and problem solving that will help them develop personally and professionally.

Prerequisites: 70% in CCT110H5 or (WRI173H5 or WRI203H5).

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT285H5 • Immersive Environment Design

Students will develop skills in the areas of bitmap/vector graphics, audio/visual production and editing, 2D/3D modeling and animation, and video game design. Students will produce immersive environments while addressing and engaging issues of remix culture and intellectual property.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and (CCT110H5 or ENG110H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT286H5 • Interactive Media Design

This course provides students with the opportunity to learn the skills necessary to produce responsive web content. Students will develop skills in the areas of website design, interactive and animated web content, mobile app development, and mobile game development.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and (CCT110H5 or ENG110H5) and CCT285H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT295H5 • Topics in Communication, Culture, Information and Technology

An in depth examination of selected topics in communication, culture, information and technology. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends on the instructor. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, S, T, P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT300H5 • Critical Analysis of Media

This course offers an overview of critical theoretical concepts and applies them to contemporary media. Students will use concepts from social theory, media studies and technology studies to critically analyze the many facets of the evolution and pervasiveness of digital media.

Prerequisites: CCT210H5 or CCT218H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT301H5 • Design for Online Cultures

This course builds upon the concepts introduced in CCT218H5, Introduction to Digital Culture, through an exploration of the design and development of online information services (e.g. websites, digital libraries). It examines the standards, modeling approaches, and methods for testing. Students will experiment with different approaches to design of websites or other online services for different types of delivery devices (e.g. desktops, mobiles).

Prerequisites: CCT218H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT302H5 • Developing and Managing Communication Campaigns and Projects

Communication campaigns and projects, whether they involve marketing, politics, or advertising require the establishment of objectives, tasks, and milestones. Furthermore developing and managing campaigns requires the development of knowledge and skills relating to the management of teams. Students will acquire analytic skills allowing them to understand the development and management of communication campaigns and projects. Current theory and research will comprise an integral part of the course as will study of the appropriate software tools. A significant component of the assessment for this course will be a group project that will involve the design of a communication campaign or project which will be presented to a group of experts.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 8.0 credits.

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT303H5 • Communicating In and Between Organizations

This course examines the nature of communications in organizations. Communications are the glue that holds organizations together. Understanding theoretically and practically the multi-faceted functions of communication in and between organizations is essential for anyone seeking to develop a career in an organization whether it be private or public. Students will acquire analytic skills allowing them to understand organizational communication from a variety of different perspectives. They will also be required to develop and actively critique practical examples of organizational communication.

Prerequisites: CCT210H5 or CCT218H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT304H5 • Visual Communication and Digital Environments

This is a project-based course that focuses on analyzing and evaluating the persuasive impact of the images we use every day to make decisions about our social networks, what we buy, how we live, what we care about, and who we are. Students will learn about rhetorical devices used in visual communications and then work in teams to create a persuasive awareness campaign for an NGO, Government Agency, Healthcare organization or other social interest group as the final project.

Prerequisites: CCT210H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/8T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT305H5 • Design and Implementation of Multimedia Documents

The principles and techniques of user-centered, functional design are introduced and applied to the analysis of software interfaces and the creation of multimedia documents. The roles of shared metaphors and mental models in clear, concise and usable designs are emphasized. Students will produce multimedia documents, which make effective use of text, colour, user input, audio, still, and time-based images.

Prerequisites: CCT250H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT306H5 • Interpersonal Communication

An introduction to the cognitive, social, dyadic and group factors that shape communication and relational development between people. The objective of this course is for students to learn and apply the communication processes involved in encoding and decoding messages that help us understand others around us. Students will learn concepts, theories, and skills related to interpersonal communication. Topics include impression management, interpersonal influence, relational development, and conversational skills.

Prerequisites: Completion of 8.0 credits

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT307H5 • Critical Infrastructure Studies

This course explores how infrastructures shape society, culture, and understanding of the human condition. We examine different infrastructures from electric networks to communication networks, data farms, environmental sensing systems, smart cities, and satellite technologies and our reliance on them. We will also examine how these infrastructures are sustained and maintained. By building on critical theories and approaches to infrastructures and their impact, the course investigates the power of infrastructure to establish the conditions of our daily lives.

Prerequisites: CCT218H5
Exclusions: CCT207H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT308H5 • Advanced Research Methodologies

This course provides students with an in-depth study and critical analysis of research methodologies within the discipline of communications and new media. Students will learn to explicitly identify generalizable findings, ethical concerns, study limitations, and new contributions to the field of knowledge using existing studies in qualitative, quantitative and mixed methodologies. Students will also gain experience in identifying and assessing problems within a research design and develop the ability to recommend revisions and/or new contexts and techniques for replicating the studies.

Prerequisites: CCT203H5 or CCT208H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT310H5 • Popular Culture and Society

How does consumerism affect symbolic production, circulation and transactions? Major modern theories of mass communication will be presented (Fiske, Bourdieu, Benjamin, Jenkins, Frankfurt school, and Marxist approaches). Students will explore new structures of mass communication in relation to popular culture systems, and their economic, technological and institutional dimensions. Topics include Disney, Hollywood, celebrity culture, social media, and user generated content in digital environments.

Prerequisites: CCT210H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT311H5 • Game Design and Theory

This course provides an introduction to games studies. It reviews the history of games, from board and card games through to the latest digital games. It enables students to understand the medium of games through various lenses such as critical theory and ethnography. Students are introduced to the concepts of game narrative, the influence of technology in digital games, and the emergence of game paradigms such as casual games, serious games, game ‘modding’, and subversive play.

Prerequisites: CCT270H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT314H5 • Mind, Media and Representation

This course applies a variety of theoretical and practical approaches to consider the multiple and often conflicting ways representations in media are produced and consumed. The study of representations is approached from the perspective that they are best understood as both discursive and ideological. Questions to be examined include: What does it mean for historical and contemporary representations to carry economic, ideological and discursive power? To what extent do audiences hold power to resist or negotiate with representations? How might we interrogate the notion that we live in a post-feminist, post-racialized society in which older ideas about gender, race and power no longer apply or need re-thinking?

Prerequisites: A minimum of 8.0 credits including CCT109H5 and CCT110H5.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT316H5 • Communication and Advertising

A study of theories in communication and meaning with different reference to advertising, advertising messages, and advertising management.

Prerequisites: CCT210H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT317H5 • Creative and Experimental Coding

This course will instruct students in the use of programming languages such as Python or Processing for novel applications, including cases from animation, design, and information visualization. Appropriate use of code libraries, platforms and programming techniques will be developed. Assessment will be based on both programming and the expressive use of programs in their case context.

Prerequisites: CCT211H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT318H5 • Sustainability and the Digital Enterprise

This course focuses on investigating the impacts of the digital enterprise on sustainability. The course presents an overview of the sustainability challenges and the concrete approaches to solving those challenges with the use of technology. The course uses an active learning approach allowing students the opportunity to learn while working on different sustainability projects linked to digital enterprises.

Prerequisites: Minimum of 8.0 credits including CCT112H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT320H5 • Communication, Technology, and Social Change

This course explores how media and media technology have shifted the nature of existing political and social orders. We will focus on how social movements and political change engage media and technology to disrupt social norms and practices that perpetuate inequality. This will bring us in contact with theories of social movement mobilization, political communication, and digital media. We may also explore the ways that legacy and digital media have changed to be in service of misinformation and state repression.

Prerequisites: CCT212H5 or CCT218H5 or CCT222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

CCT321H5 • Introduction to Finance

This course will provide students with an understanding of investment appraisal from a financial standpoint. It will provide them with the necessary tools to construct the financial component of a business plan and analyze the financial performance of a company. It will examine the practical problems of capital budgeting and highlight the techniques of performing ongoing monitoring of a company's financial health and risks.

Prerequisites: CCT112H5 and (CCT219H5 or CCT319H5) and CCT224H5
Exclusions: MGM230H5 or MGT230H5 or MGT331Y1 or MGT337Y5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT324H5 • Organizational Studies II

Overview of individual and group behaviour in organizations, including motivation, communication, decision making, influence and group dynamics. Examination of major aspects of organizational design including structure, environment, technology, goals, size, inter-organizational relationships, innovation and change.

Prerequisites: CCT224H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT325H5 • Media Economics II

This course explores macroeconomics through the analysis of national and international crises. The course begins with a discussion of the nature of economics, a brief examination of markets, and a discussion of crisis and growth. We survey the institutions and dynamics of growth in the post WWII period, their breakdown in the 1960s and the spread of international crisis in the 1970s, and the crises of various economic policy responses from the 1980s to the present. After this historical overview, we explore macroeconomic theory and its development over the last 50 years. We study the Keynesian model and its emphasis on employment and output, its crisis in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the rise of monetarist alternatives, the elaboration of aggregate supply and demand models highlighting prices instead of employment, the surge of supply-side and rational expectations economics during the Reagan administration and the continuing debates among economists over the merits and problems of the various theoretical approaches. The course closes with an examination the various forms of crises tied to the emergence of information and communications technologies and the knowledge economy.

Prerequisites: CCT219H5 or CCT319H5 or ECO100Y5 or (ECO101H5 or ECO102H5).
Exclusions: MGD425H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT327H5 • Price Management

Price setting is one of the most important marketing mix decisions, which involves understanding both supply side factors (e.g., costs), and demand side factors (e.g. consumer willingness to pay). In this course, we will approach the pricing decision with a more pragmatic view encompassing a comprehensive understanding of the demand side; both at the level of individual customer values, and the more aggregate level of price sensitivities of the market. Using diverse categories, such as healthcare, industrial products and consumer packaged goods, this course will equip students with economic and behavioral approaches to pricing, value pricing, price customization, price bundling and retail pricing strategies.

Prerequisites: CCT219H5 or CCT221H5 or MGT252H5.
Exclusions: MGT355H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT328H5 • Project Management

Approaches to the management of complex technical projects will be investigated. Topics include project estimating, costing and evaluation, organizing and managing project teams, quantitative methods for project planning and scheduling, introduction to computer-based project management tools. The course may involve an applied field project.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 8.0 credits.
Exclusions: MGD428H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT331H5 • Social Media and Society

This course introduces students to critical approaches to social media drawing from theories and fields including software studies, platform studies, critical theory and political economy. The course provides students with tools and theories to analyze and understand current social media connectivity, and how social media platforms function as socio-cultural systems.

Prerequisites: CCT218H5 or CCT222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT332H5 • Canadian Communication Policy

This course examines the policy and regulatory frameworks that shape media, culture, and technology in Canada. The course surveys the historical development of communication policy in Canada, broadly understood, and introduces students to issues and debates in the development of communication policy for specific sectors such as broadcasting, creative industries, platforms, and the internet.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT333H5 • Social Innovation

This course introduces students to the strategies and processes of social innovation through usability studies, systems analysis, and artifact prototyping for new products or services for underserved groups. Students will learn various techniques of understanding user needs requirements and design methodologies, and apply this knowledge to create socially innovative prototypes to apply to real world situations. By the end of this course, students will have worked in groups to develop design alternatives for a technological artifact or system of their choosing, gain knowledge of human-centred design strategies and learn how to become change agents through case studies, best practice analyses, and relevant readings.

Prerequisites: CCT250H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT334H5 • History and Theory of Game Production

This course will examine the principles, theory and practice behind the production of games. By examining the history and contributions of early founders such as Atari and Activision, all the way to present-day leaders such as Electronic Arts and Sony, students will gain an understanding of how the global video game industry operates. The lectures and practical work will foster an approach to the understanding of game production issues including technology, law, marketplace and audience demand.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT335H5 • Technology and the City

Technology continues to reshape the physical contours of our built environments as much as it redefines our conceptualization of how we inhabit and interact within them. This course investigates how urban form, space, infrastructure and communication are mediated by new and evolving technologies.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/11T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT340H5 • Gender, Media and Technology

This course brings a gendered lens to the study of media and technology. The course explores the (re)production and (re)presentation of gender through communicative practices in a variety of mediums, including print media, TV, activist media, video games and online platforms. The course develops an understanding of gender ideologies and how media, technologies, and communication help produce gender. The course examines the way gender identities are constructed by mainstream and alternative media; gendered divisions of media and digital labour; the relationship between ICTs and the performance of gender and sexuality; masculinities, gender politics; feminist theory; and the construction and negotiation of gender in relation to mediated environments.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5 and (CCT200H5 or CCT210H5 or CCT222H5 or WRI173H5 or WRI203H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT341H5 • Introduction to IT Consulting

Information Technology (IT) Consulting is a growing profession that embodies the use of computer-supported collaborative tools in the execution of business functions. In this course students engage with the principles of Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) through an experiential opportunity to work with a real client. Students create an IT Consulting company and take on the role of consultants, learning core skills (soft and hard) necessary for this profession, including client management, communication, ideation, analysis and solution development, project management, presentation skills, and web design. Using case studies we discuss consulting lessons learned and problems to avoid within the context of industry best practices.

Prerequisites: Minimum of 8.0 credits.

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT353H5 • Digital Media Production l

This foundational course is centred on the practical aspects of producing narrative, still, and time-based imagery in digital environments. Industry-standard workflows and delivery systems of digital media production, including photography, video, and audio production platforms will be explored.


Prerequisites: CCT250H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT354H5 • Digital Marketing II

This course examines digital marketing strategies and the role of online and mobile advertising platforms. Students will explore how emerging technologies are used to facilitate B2B and B2C transactions. A number of domains will be covered (search, display, programmatic trading, mobile, social, etc.) to give students a comprehensive understanding of both existing marketing strategies and emerging trends. This class will emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to digital marketing while helping students develop a greater understanding of the different elements of marketing campaigns from formulation and implementation to integration and assessment.

Prerequisites: CCT221H5
Exclusions: CCT356H5 or MGT414H5 (Winter 2022) or MGT450H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT355H5 • Critical Approaches to Innovation

This course provides students with a survey of critical theories appropriate to the study of technological innovation. Students will: 1) explore theories of the social, cultural, and ecological impacts of technological innovation; 2) apply these theoretical lenses to the study of trends in innovation; and 3) propose a product or approach to innovation using social, cultural, or ecological criteria.

Prerequisites: CCT224H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT356H5 • Online Advertising and Marketing

This course investigates the industrial practices and tools of effectively marketing and promoting goods and services online. Topics include analysis of contemporary online advertisement design, the effective use of social media technologies in product marketing, planning online campaigns that reinforce and complement existing marketing and advertising efforts, and understanding key metrics used to evaluate a campaign's effectiveness.

Prerequisites: CCT260H5
Exclusions: CCT354H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT360H5 • Web Development and Design II

This course will introduce advanced standards-based frameworks that support the development of responsive front-end systems. Key concepts covered in this course include the application of advanced markup and design strategies, scripting languages applied to dynamic interactions, frameworks and code version control, and foundations of server-side implementations.

Prerequisites: CCT260H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT361H5 • Speculative Design II

In this course students are introduced to programming languages regularly used in management operations. Students will learn what these languages are, when and why they are applied, and how to read and write basic scripting code. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with scripting so that they can communicate more effectively with programmers in business settings.

Prerequisites: CCT261H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT365H5 • Surveillance

From the Orwellian Big Brother to Foucault's panopticon, surveillance has become an everyday facet of modern life. From a surveillance studies perspective surveillance can be applied as a framework for understanding social, political, and technological interrelationships. This framework can help us study more effectively power, identity, persuasion, and control associated with the spread of Information Communication Technologies (ICT's). This course will introduce students to viewpoints, vision and visibility in surveillance studies. The class will look at a range of topics from information politics, identification, privacy, security, suspicion, social sorting, bodies, borders and biometrics to explore a range of perspectives under the surveillance studies umbrella. It will introduce students to key issues surrounding data, discrimination, and visibility in a global context to undercover the watched world.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5 and CCT206H5 or CCT222H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT371H5 • Sound as Media

Sound as Media will provide students with an immersive introduction to the field of sound studies. The course offers a counterpoint to surveys of visual media by exploring acoustic technologies in historical, cultural and spatial context. By considering examples such as the gramophone, public address system, boombox, and MP3 player as well as the theories that account for them, students will develop an understanding of media forms that engage the ear as well as the eye. They will in turn, have the opportunity to apply this understanding to the final project which will give them hands-on experience with creating a sound-based documentary.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 8.0 credits including CCT109H5 or CCT110H5 or CCT111H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT373H5 • Career Planning and Development

The transition from university studies to professional settings necessitates the articulation of how acquired skill sets, education, professional contacts, supporting resources, and related experiences connect to and influence career trajectories. To facilitate agility in navigating the ever-shifting global economy, within and outside of the classroom students are provided with a mixture of structured, self-directed, independent, and team activities that aid in the development and refinement of professional identities, community networks, communication approaches, and problem solving skills.

Prerequisites: CCT273H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT374H5 • Critical Histories of Information Technologies

The course approaches current information and communication technologies from critical and historical perspectives. It investigates the interests, motives and tactics of news media, pop culture producers, amateurs, universities, corporations, and governments in promoting, sustaining, and interpreting information and communication systems. It also asks how the focus will be on media and information technologies, more theoretical or methodological readings will necessarily cover other systems. Case studies may include investigations of orality, writing, the printing press, industrialized printing, and electronic media from the telegraph and the telephone to broadcasting and the internet.

Prerequisites: CCT218H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT380H5 • Human-Computer Interaction and Communication

The emphasis in this course will be on theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues in the study of Human-Computer Interaction. Intelligent interface designs, usability assessment, user modeling and the accessibility of the technology for the disabled are among the topics to be examined. Related behavioural investigations concerning the ease and efficiency of users' interactions with computerized environments will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT381H5 • Media Audiences

Audiences are social constructions which must be imagined to be actualized. Beginning with an exploration of the nature and role of audiences from early 20th century media, students explore how audiences make meaning of popular media platforms today. How are audiences situated within media texts, what role does this play in how media is generated and circulated, and how do audiences both enact and resist media influence? Broadcast models, interactive models, audience reading, gender, culture, race, and audience feedback are investigated.

Prerequisites: CCT210H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT382H5 • Prototyping Digital Games

This course explores the fundamentals of the process of game design through prototyping. It focuses on the contexts and components of game design, such as design iteration and user testing along relevant dimensions such as art style, narrative, and game balance. Students will be introduced to design across different genres and types of digital games, including games for education, serious games, indie, and AAA games. Working in collaborative groups, students will learn and practice the appropriate methodology to design game mechanics, characters, art assets and other appropriate deliverables in order to create a game or high-fidelity prototype.

Prerequisites: (CCT211H5 or CCT285H5) and CCT270H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT383H5 • The Interactive Society

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical study of how interactive digital media and systems affect, influence and reshape our society and what does it mean to be a "user" in the information-centric society. It will expose students to specific theoretical issues such as privacy by design, usable privacy, marginalized and at-risk user groups, the digital divide, behavioural modification (persuasion) through new media, ICT4D (info tech for development) and empowerment/alienation through intelligent interactive systems. Focus will be on developing skills that will enable students to propose changes (design, policy, framework) to existing and future envisioned interactive technologies that address the issues analyzed.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 8.0 credits including CCT109H5 and CCT110H5.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT386H5 • Information Practice in Virtual Worlds: Exploration of Information Environments

Virtual environments, immersive 3D environments accessed via computers or virtual reality headsets, comprise a unique and futuristic communication environment. Virtual environments have the potential to support a wide variety of activities related to information creation, distribution, and reception and can support social, economic, and cultural causes. Compared to everyday information practices, however, those enacted in virtual worlds are uniquely characterized by multimodality, synchronicity, digital embodiment and geographic distribution of users. In this course, students engage in participatory learning in virtual environments, using avatars to assess how the world's technological and social affordances support and constrain information practices. Using theories of gaming, virtuality, and information lifecycles, students critically analyse how information is produced and used in these environments.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 8.0 credits including CCT109H5 and CCT110H5.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT390H5 • Digital Media and Communications Abroad

Students on International exchange programs are encouraged to seek out courses in digital media and technologies that enrich their learning within an international context. This course is intended as an opportunity for students to study global issues and contexts abroad that provide a comparator to the Canadian media and communications landscape.


Prerequisites: Permission of ICCIT Director.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT395H5 • Topics in Communication, Culture, Information & Technology

An in-depth examination of selected topics in communication, culture and information technology. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, S, T, P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 8.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT399H5 • Research Opportunity Program (ROP)

This course provides an opportunity for third or higher year students to assist with the research project of a professor in return for 399H course credit. Students have an opportunity to become involved in original research and enhance their research skills. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Participating faculty members post their project description for the following summer and fall/winter session on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 10.0 credits or permission of instructor.
Exclusions: CCT399Y5 or VCC399Y5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program (ROP)

This course provides an opportunity for third or higher year students to assist with the research project of a professor in return for 399Y course credit. Students have an opportunity to become involved in original research and enhance their research skills. Based on the nature of the project, projects may satisfy the Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences distribution requirement. Participating faculty members post their project description for the following summer and fall/winter session on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 10.0 credits or permission of instructor
Exclusions: CCT299Y5 or VCC399Y5

Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT400H5 • Advanced Project

Majors and specialists are given the opportunity to develop a critical perspective on selected issues in CCIT. Students design and implement an advanced project on a topic of interest by engaging with advanced readings. A central aim is to refine the skills in critical analysis and in oral and written communication.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT401H5 • Advanced Thesis Course

Students will carry out a research project on a topic of their choosing which is related to their specific program focus in Digital Enterprise Management. Students will meet as a group for selected seminars emphasizing advanced research skills and thesis writing. Students will develop a research proposal, conduct research, and produce a research paper.

Prerequisites: CCT203H5 or CCT208H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT402H5 • Creating, Protecting and Managing Digital Artifacts

Digital artifacts play an increasingly important role in our society. It is essential that in the digitization of these artifacts appropriate attention is paid to their representation, protection and management. Students will review the theories and practices of representation. They will investigate the technologies associated with the storage of digital artifacts as well as investigating appropriate legal perspectives. This varied knowledge will be integrated into a study of best practices in the management of digital artifacts.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits including CCT206H5.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT403H5 • Finance, Innovation and the Digital Firm

Students will learn about financial aspects of digital industries. They will gain knowledge about how financial and other incentives shape the decisions of agents in the digital marketplace. Such a knowledge helps to identify industry trends aiding their own decisions when participating in Internet related industries. Topics covered include online and traditional media industries, aspects of e-commerce and marketing, open source software and crowd-sourcing. A highly effective way to gain such knowledge is by covering a relevant topic in an academic essay. This way the students will also improve their writing skills, and learn better how to cover financial aspects of their chosen topic in a scholarly manner.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT404H5 • Remote Work, Technology and Collaboration

This project-based course aims to demonstrate how collaboration is a critical capability often overlooked. During the course students will integrate their learning and experience and first hand see how, in combination with collaboration it can lead to creatively solving problems in areas as varied as business, health care delivery, urban planning and development. In addition to lectures, students will have the benefit of a series of guest lecturers. A large, group based project will serve to integrate learning and allow students the benefit of experiential learning.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.
Recommended Preparation: CCT204H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT405H5 • Individual Project

A research project carried out under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will carry out a research project on a selected topic related to CCIT. Students must obtain signed permission from the faculty member who they would like to have as their supervisor.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.
Exclusions: CCT401H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT407Y5 • Advanced Field Experiences in CCIT

This course provides students the opportunity to test their skills, immerse themselves within a different cultural or social context and explore communication and technology issues through an intense field experience either in Canada or abroad. The type of field experience varies from year to year and some experiences may evolve through collaborations with other disciplines or through special industry projects. The advanced field experience may involve travel and participation in international conferences or other relevant activities. Students are responsible for travel expenses.

Prerequisites: Permission of the ICCIT Director.
Exclusions: CCT409H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT409H5 • Special Topics in Work-Based Learning

An advanced unpaid field placement working on specially designed projects that explore collaborative, collective and global approaches to practical knowledge application. The placements may include international internships, collaborative group internships and community-based initiatives. The projects may vary from year to year depending on the external partners. Students will engage with others in the course through an online class component and complete individual reports and critical evaluations of the work experience.

Prerequisites: A minimum 13.0 credits and CGPA of 2.5.
Exclusions: CCT410H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT410H5 • CCIT Internship I

This course is a practical internship and is available only upon application from students registered in the CCIT/DEM/TCS programs. Through a placement, students will apply the expertise in communication, culture, and information technology that they have gained through previous courses. Students must plan well in advance for the placement and work closely with the placement officer for CCIT to determine eligibility and suitability. A report and presentation will be required at the end of the placement. These, along with the employer's assessment, will provide the main part of the course mark.

Prerequisites: Completion of 13.0 credits with a minimum CGPA of 2.5 and approval of the internship coordinator/instructor, and evidence of additional career development (e.g. workshops, networking events, and professional communication with faculty, librarians, staff, and peers).
Exclusions: CCT409H5 and WRI410H5.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 14S
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT411H5 • CCIT Internship II

This course is a practical internship and is available upon application from students registered in any CCIT program who have completed CCT410H5. The course is intended for students who have the opportunity to continue their CCT410H5 internship for a second semester. A report and presentation will be required at the end of the placement. These, along with the employer's assessment, will provide the main part of the course mark.

Prerequisites: (Completion of 13.0 credits including CCT409H5 or CCT410H5 or WRI410H5) and minimum CGPA of 2.5 and permission of Internship Coordinator.
Exclusions: WRI411H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT414H5 • Special Topics in Knowledge, Media and Design

An in-depth examination of selected topics in interactive digital media with emphasis on knowledge, media and design. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, S, T, P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT416H5 • Social Data Analytics

This course highlights the research in analysis for social data and builds skills to undertake those analysis. It is a lab-intensive course intended to build up data analytic skills for novice and intermediate researchers. Students look at recent studies using "big data" which are primarily theoretical, including critiques of data analytics and concerns surrounding data ethics. Students learn a programming language -- Python -- and how to scrape social data, store and collect it, run basic statistics, generate visuals, and create a report based on a project of interest.

Prerequisites: CCT203H5 or CCT208H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT417H5 • Alternative Media

This course examines the history, politics and aesthetics of a range of alternative, underground and radical media, as well as their relation to mainstream media. Students will study and experiment with a range of alternative media, including zines, graffiti, hacking, and culture jamming, for example. Students will gain hands-on experience in the creation of alternative media.

Prerequisites: Minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT418H5 • Work, Media and Technology

The course analyses the political, historical, and technical relationships between media, technology, and work in contemporary capitalism. The course will examine the power and social relationships that structure work in contexts such as media, creative industries, and the platform or "gig" economy. The course will focus on critical theories of work and will engage with case studies of the intersection of work, media and technology. The aim of the course is to build a tool kit for encountering an increasingly casualized and digitally-mediated labour market.

Prerequisites: CCT219H5 or CCT222H5 or CCT319H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT419H5 • User Experience Design - UXD and Board Games

This course allows students to explore issues related to user interface, user experience, materiality, gamification and game theory. Board games represent a space to consider social interaction, the use of materials, the role of emotion in design (UX), knowledge sharing and the role gamification plays in influencing behaviour. Students will be exposed to professional and research publications related to design, game theory, user experience and game mechanics.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT420H5 • Information Technology and Globalization

The variety of ways in which various information technologies influence and are influenced by globalization will be critically examined. The class will explore metaphors or ways of thinking about society and technology to critically examine the complex process and the diverse consequences of globalization. Topics may shift focus yearly but will include the economy, culture, politics, social movements, migration, social identity, war and global conflict, etc.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits including CCT109H5 and CCT110H5.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT424H5 • Organizational Studies III

An in-depth study of the development of innovative strategies for organizations with an emphasis on digital enterprises. The nature of strategic innovation will be studied and a variety of analytic frameworks introduced. Concepts will be explored through a combination of lectures and case studies.

Prerequisites: CCT112H5 and (CCT219H5 or CCT319H5 or CCT321H5) and (CCT221H5 or CCT322H5) and CCT324H5.
Exclusions: MGT400H5 or MGM400H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT430H5 • Networked Life

The rise of information and communication technologies in contemporary societies has highlighted the interdependent nature of relationships; person-person, person-machine, machine-person, and machine-machine. Network analysis offers a point-of-view with which we can analyze networks to understand the roles of people and technology, identify the source of existing or potential issues, and the exchange of resources and information. This course applies network theory and methodology to examine how technology is used to maintain and build personal networks. It will further explore how personal networks intersect with larger institutional networks (e.g. corporations and universities) and informal networks (e.g. online communities and sports clubs). In the process, students will be guided in how to identify, measure, and collect data on selected networks, how to then analyze this data using a variety of analytic techniques.

Prerequisites: CCT203H5 or CCT208H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT431H5 • Drones, Robots, Artificial Intelligence

Drones, robots, and artificial intelligence are three interrelated technologies that are changing the most fundamental considerations of how society and sociality should operate. Work, war, consumption, and even love are being reconfigured. This course will address debates concerning the cultural, political, economic, military, and economic considerations surrounding the growing use of these technologies.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT432H5 • Ethics and Code

A self-driving car should always protect pedestrians, even if that implies serious threat for the vehicle's passengers. Current ethical challenges within our computational cultures has brought forward dilemmas involving code such as designing killer robots, the use of technology to predict and prevent crimes before they happen, and platform surveillance in social media. Students in this course will use theories and case based examples to examine questions such as what is meant with ethics in new media and critical computing, can we program computational systems according to ethical models, and does digital culture force us to rethink what ethics are?

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT434H5 • Design Thinking II

An advanced project-based seminar on the art and creative directions of design thinking. Combining traditional and innovative creativity methods, a variety of design projects are conceptualized and drafted for proposal or implementation. This course embraces design thinking as a holistic, interdisciplinary approach that integrates methodical creativity and overarching design principles, such as aesthetics, futures-thinking, progress and metadesign.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits including CCT204H5.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT435H5 • Media and Outer Space

Examines the relationship between media studies and Outer Space inhabitation and exploration. Through analysis of military, technological, industrial, scientific, design, artistic, and civilian projects, films, novels, science fictions, and other media forms, the class investigates and reveals the historical, social, cultural, and political implications of our mediated relation with Outer Space. Technologies and topics include: the space race and the Cold War, space imagery, extreme environments, space travel, space suits, space vehicles, and space habitats, satellites, extra-terrestrial intelligence, mining, extraction, terraforming, radiation, gravity, and levitation.


Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits
Exclusions: CCT495H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT436H5 • Cultures of Connection

This seminar course students will conduct original research to examine the role that culture plays in choosing and using communication technologies within the context of family, work, and friendship. We will focus on how individuals draw on communication technology to navigate cultural expectations and roles at home, work, and in social settings. To frame this research we will discuss various approaches to defining and understanding culture, and consider how these approaches help us to understand the use of communication technology within a variety of relationships.

Prerequisites: CCT109H5 and CCT110H5 and CCT208H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT440H5 • Power, Privilege and Technology

How is social inequality reproduced and encoded in technology systems and in digital media? In what ways do technology and media creations inform and influence perceptions, beliefs, and practices that impact girls and women, communities of colour, Indigenous groups, LGBTQ+ and other minoritized people? This course will address overlapping and intersectional issues of power, privilege, oppression, and sociotechnical imaginaries - all related to networks, big data and predictive analytics, algorithms, digital gig economies, and interactive multimedia like social media and virtual reality.

Prerequisites: CCT200H5 and CCT222H5
Exclusions: CCT395H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT453H5 • Digital Media Production II

Building on the CCT353H5 Digital Media Production I, this course will further develop theoretical and practical aspects of video production and editing. Over the course of the term, we will explore advanced video and sound capture techniques, media mixing, applications of digital libraries and effects in post-processing.

Prerequisites: CCT353H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT454H5 • Documentary Practices

This course explores the form and practice of documentary. Objectivity, ethics, censorship, representation, reflexivity, responsibility to the audience and authorial voice will be examined. Students will engage in practical engagement with documentary forms including the expanded field of documentary using tools such as photography, audio, video, 360 video, VR and new technologies.


Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT460H5 • Web Development and Design III

This course builds on the front-end web development skills acquired in the Web Development and Design I & II courses by adding a server-side programming and database design component. Students will learn the theoretical and practical aspects of implementing data-driven applications, leveraging query languages, APIs and Content Management Systems for enterprise systems. Further topics include integration of analytics and search strategies in CMS systems.


Prerequisites: CCT360H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT461H5 • Speculative Design III

Emerging technologies have the potential to transform business models and architectures. In this course students learn the functional and technical underpinnings of selected emerging technologies and critically analyse how these technologies are impacting business functions. Students also gain hands-on experience with emerging technologies and consider how they may be applied or adapted to solve management issues.

Prerequisites: CCT361H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT470H5 • Information Visualization

Visual literacy and the visualization of information are increasingly important competencies in a growing number of fields. This course will explore the history of visually representing information, consider issues related to data visualization and approaches to visually representing data. In addition, students will develop a better understanding of what visualization works best for various types of data, what makes for a strong visualization and the importance of narrative in the construction of graphic data representation.

Prerequisites: CCT210H5 and (CCT286H5 or CCT304H5)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT472H5 • Media Archaeology

This course examines media as technical objects with specific histories and a contemporary presence. In the contemporary context where media technologies are programmed to become obsolete, residual forms and practices provide materials traces for analysis. The class will focus on the evolution of media forms, looking particularly at early, antiquated, and obsolete practices and technologies of communication in order to recover their material traces, and to situate them in their historical, social, cultural, and political contexts. Through texts, archival materials, and case studies, old media will be brought back to life to question notions of authenticity, authority, preservation, archiving, temporality, agency, power, evolution, decay, and death.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits and 2.3 CGPA

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT473H5 • Career Strategies

In this course students will learn about various challenges that new graduates, future managers, and future executives will face in the workplace. Students will learn the theoretical as well as practical techniques that will help them succeed after graduating from their undergraduate programs.

Prerequisites: Minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT475H5 • Thesis in Integrated Learning in Digital Media, Communication, and Technology

This capstone project course carried out independently under the supervision of a faculty member requires students to reflect on the experiences they gained during their two work placements connected with the Professional Experience Certificate in Digital Media, Communication, and Technology, and develop a comprehensive case study that integrates theories learned within ICCIT and their work placements. Students will be required to participate in one-on-one consultations with the course instructor.

Prerequisites: CCT273H5 and CCT373H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT476H5 • Foundations of Operations Management

Operations Management deals with the functions of an enterprise that create value for the customers. The scope of study covers all processes involved in the design, production and physical distribution of goods and services. With global competition continuously increasing, a firm's survival depends upon how well it integrates the operations function into the enterprise's general planning and strategy. It is thus essential for business managers to acquire an understanding and appreciation of operations.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits including CCT224H5.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT477H5 • UX Design - Understanding Users

The focus of the course is on understanding the experiences of users and their communities as affected by their interaction with digital technologies in information-centric societies. Students will learn the theoretical framework and practical aspects of advances user-centered design principles (such as participatory design and techno-centric ethnographies). This course represents an opportunity for students to enrich their understanding of the deep interconnections between human factors, human needs, interactive technologies, information, as projected on several dimensions: cultural, societal, ergonomic, and economic.

Prerequisites: CCT380H5
Exclusions: CCT485H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT478H5 • UX Design - Prototyping and Evaluation

The course investigates how people interact with interactive digital systems from an evaluation and formal testing perspective, and introduces students to the methods of User Experience Assessment and User Experience Analysis (UXA). This studio-based experiential course examines how interactive systems are implemented and deployed to meet users' needs, with a focus on formal Human Computer Interaction (HCI) evaluation methods. Students will acquire the capacity to evaluate systems and to critically assess different HCI and UX validation methods which are based on industry approaches carried out by User Research Analysis.

Prerequisites: CCT380H5
Exclusions: CCT480H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT481H5 • Augmented Places and Social Media Spaces

Increasingly we are seeing a hybridization of information and location, where media provide a framework or environment for users (participants) to construct reality and relationships. The course explores emergence of new ubiquitous communication practices and the increasingly pervasive use of technology for the augmentation of people, places, and objects. In this course, students will explore various approaches to context-based information systems, and the shaping of social media spaces.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CCT483H5 • Play, Performance and Community in Digital Games

Students will explore the complex relationship between games and play. Starting with an overview of the major play theories, students will learn how cognitive, philosophical and social theories of play are used to guide and inform game design. The increasingly prominent role of the player in the co-creation and performance of digital games will be examined. Students will also explore the emergence of player communities and consider the various issues that this introduces into design and management process, including important new questions about governance, player and creative freedoms, and immaterial labour.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits, including CCT270H5.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT486H5 • Digital Platforms: A Global Perspective

From Apple, Amazon, and Facebook to LINE, WeChat and TikTok, digital platforms dominate contemporary life. This course provides an intellectual voyage of the global spread of digital platforms from the days when they were not yet recognized as platforms to the contemporary era when users can hardly think of an internet without platforms. We will explore questions concerning the penetration of platforms into the social fabric of our digital life on a global scale while paying attention to the local conditions and specificity. Students will engage with key concepts, theories, and approaches related to platform studies through readings and discussions about different types of platforms, ranging from e-commerce and social media to live-streaming and on-demand service matching.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits
Exclusions: CCT490H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT487H5 • Advanced Communication Policy in a Global Context

This course provides students with a theoretical and practical understanding of media, technology, and cultural policy in a global context. The course focuses on issues such as national identity and globalization, media convergence, intellectual property, global media regulation, security and privacy by examining how media, communication, and cultural policy is created, influenced, and contested by a range of actors.

Prerequisites: CCT206H5 and CCT332H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT490H5 • Topics in Communication, Culture, Information and Technology

An in-depth examination of selected topics in communication, culture, information and technology. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, S, T, P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT495H5 • Topics in Communication, Culture, Information & Technology

An in-depth examination of selected topics in communication, culture, information and technology. Topics vary from year to year and the content in any given year depends on the instructor. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, S, T, P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT499H5 • Research Opportunity Program (ROP)

This course provides an opportunity for third or higher year students to assist with the resource project of a profession in return for 499H credit. Students have an opportunity to become involved in original research and enhance their research skills. Participating faculty members post their project description for the following summer and fall/winter session on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits or permission of instructor.
Exclusions: CCT499Y5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT499Y5 • Research Opportunity

This course provides an opportunity for third or higher year students to assist with the resource project of a profession in return for 499Y credit. Students have an opportunity to become involved in original research and enhance their research skills. Participating faculty members post their project description for the following summer and fall/winter session on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI101H5 • Introductory Chinese for Students with Prior Background

This course is designed for students who have some prior knowledge of Chinese. Potential students for this course are able to speak and understand elementary Mandarin or any Chinese dialects but with minimal literacy skills (reading and writing), or are able to read and write with either traditional or simplified character at beginner level. This course focuses on phonetics and literacy of Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) and addresses integrated skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing and translation.

Prerequisites: NOTE: All students who are enrolling in a CHI language course for the first time (do not have the prerequisite) are required to complete a language assessment questionnaire. Students who have not completed an assessment cannot be approved for course enrolment. Please visit www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/chineselanguage-course-questionnai….
Exclusions: CHI100Y5 or CHI101Y5 or EAS100Y1 or EAS101Y1 or LGG60H3 or LGG61H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI103H5 • Introductory Chinese I

Intended for students with none or minimal background in Mandarin or any Chinese dialects, this course provides a comprehensive introduction to phonetics and written form of Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) and covers the topics of functional Chinese at beginner level. All students are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire before enrolling in this course. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires and complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire by no later than August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.

Prerequisites: All students are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires) before enrolling in this course.
Exclusions: CHI100Y5 or EAS100Y1 or EAS101Y1 or LGGA60H3 or LGGA61H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI104H5 • Introductory Chinese II

As the second half of Introductory Chinese, this course continues to expand students’ knowledge and develop their language skills of Mandarin. More topics of functional Chinese are covered in this course. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite of CHI103H5 are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).

Prerequisites: CHI103H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: CHI100Y5 or EAS100Y1 or EAS101Y1 or LGGA60H3 or LGGA61H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI203H5 • Intermediate Low Chinese I

As a continuation of Introductory Chinese, this course aims at developing students' language comprehension, expanding their vocabulary and grammar, and improving their skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing and translation in Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) at intermediate level. The course content is focused on functional topics. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…) by August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.


Prerequisites: CHI104H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: CHI200Y5 or CHI201H5 or CHI202H5 or EAS200Y1 or EAS201H1 or LGGB60H3 or LGGB61H3 or LGGB62H3 or LGGB63H3 or LGGB64H3 or LGGB65H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI204H5 • Intermediate Low Chinese II

As the second half of Intermediate Chinese, this course continues to develop students' language comprehension, expand their vocabulary and grammar, and improve their skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing and translation in Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) at the intermediate level. The course content is focused on functional topics. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite for this course are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire before enrolling in this course. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires and complete the assessment questionnaire by no later than August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.  

Prerequisites: CHI203H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: CHI200Y5 or CHI201H5 or EAS200Y1 or EAS201H1 or LGGB60H3 or LGGB61H3 or LGGB62H3 or LGGB63H3 or LGGB64H3 or LGGB65H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI211H5 • Chinese for Academic Purposes I

This course, designed for native or near-native speakers of Mandarin Chinese, develops rhetorical knowledge and critical thinking skills for effective academic reading and writing. Students will also receive training in conducting effective formal presentations with supporting media and public speaking skills.

Prerequisites: Appropriate language level as indicated in the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires) or interview.
Exclusions: CHI200Y5 or CHI201Y5 or CHI201H5 or CHI202H5 or EAS200Y1 or EAS201H1 or LGGB60H3 or LGGB61H3 or LGGB62H3 or LGGB63H3 or LGGB64H3 or LGGB65H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CHI212H5 • Chinese for Academic Purposes II

This course, designed for native or near-native speakers of Mandarin Chinese, continues the study of rhetorical knowledge and critical thinking skills for effective academic reading and writing. It also prepares students for upper level courses which demand in-depth reading, writing, as well as professional presentation skills.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 or appropriate language level as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires) or interview.
Exclusions: CHI200Y5 or CHI201Y5 or CHI202H5 or EAS200Y1 or EAS201H1 or LGGB60H3 or LGGB61H3 or LGGB62H3 or LGGB63H3 or LGGB64H3 or LGGB65H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Online (Summer only)

CHI303H5 • Intermediate High Chinese I

This course, designed for second-language learners of Mandarin Chinese, aims to: 1) develop listening and speaking skills in handling daily routines and social situations related to personal lives; 2) improve reading and writing skills in narration and description on everyday topics; and 3) cultivate cultural knowledge that facilitates effective intercultural communication. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…) by August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.

Prerequisites: CHI204H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: CHI201H5 and CHI202H5 and LGGC60H3 and LGGC61H3 and EAS300Y1.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI304H5 • Intermediate High Chinese II

This course, designed for second-language learners of Mandarin Chinese, is the second half of Intermediate High Chinese. It continues to: 1) develop listening and speaking skills in handling daily routines and social situations related to personal lives; 2) improve reading and writing skills in narration and description on everyday topics; and 3) cultivate cultural knowledge that facilitates effective intercultural communication. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…) by August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.


Prerequisites: CHI303H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: CHI201H5 or CHI202H5 or EAS300Y1 or LGGC60H3 or LGGC61H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI308H5 • Chinese Cultural Studies Seminar

This seminar course provides a platform for critical discussion of what we call "Chinese culture". Students will consider ideas of invented traditions, the essentialization of culture, and questions about modern states and regions. Topics may include Chinese civilization, customs, rituals, religion, philosophy, ideology, morals, literature, folk art and craft, performance arts, martial arts, cuisine, medicine, etc. The discussions will draw from historical and contemporary topics.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI310H5 • Chinese for Career Development

This course is designed for near-native or native speakers of Mandarin Chinese who are interested in advancing their careers in Chinese-speaking regions and in North America. Students will develop knowledge in career planning from cross-cultural perspectives, from job search, to applications and interview processes in Chinese-speaking regions of Asia and in North America. They will build a solid foundation for reading, writing, and speaking Chinese in a business setting.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI311H5 • Classical Chinese Literature

This course will examine representative genres of traditional Chinese literature—poetry, prose, fiction, and drama—with an emphasis on language structure, style, and the influence on modern Chinese society and culture. We will also analyze the aesthetic features of classics and discuss the influences of traditional Chinese society on literature in terms of religion, philosophy, the imperial system, gender, family, and ethnicity.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5
Exclusions: EAS358Y1 and EAS306Y1 and LGGC66H3 and LGGC67H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI312H5 • Chinese Diaspora Literature and Culture

This course examines literary and cinematic works as well as visual art by authors of the Chinese diaspora. The course covers topics such as multiculturalism, racism, cultural preservation, invented traditions, and agency through the lens of overseas Chinese writers and creators.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5
Exclusions: LGGC62H3 or LGGC63H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI313H5 • The Wisdom of Life in Traditional Chinese Culture

This course explores different thought systems, ideas and the wisdom of human life rooted in traditional Chinese culture from the following two approaches: a theoretical discussion of the purpose, meaning, and value of human life, ideals and ways of life, existential questions and multiple solutions; and a historical as well as critical examination of the conventional wisdom originated by Chinese cultural figures like Laozi, Confucius, Mencius, Sima Qian, Zhu Xi, Qian Mu, Qian Zhongshu and more. The goal of the course is to facilitate student consideration of the essence of human life and the understanding of contemporary Chinese views by ascertaining traditional Chinese erudition. Through the examination of traditional Chinese scholarship, students will develop an understanding of the connection between such teachings and contemporary Chinese views.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5
Exclusions: EAS414H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI314H5 • Chinese Culture through Media

This course examines Chinese cultural traditions and values through contemporary media produced in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Background readings and literary works will provide students with the necessary historical and cultural context for each work. Class discussions will focus on the political, social and cultural transformations presented in the media. Special attention will be paid to topics such as family, class issues, gender and identity.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI403H5 • Advanced Chinese I

This course, designed for second-language learners of Mandarin Chinese, aims to: 1) develop listening and speaking skills in handling most informal and some formal communicative tasks; 2) strengthen reading and writing skills in expository and persuasive essays on familiar cultural and social topics; 3) cultivate cultural knowledge that facilitates effective intercultural communication. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…) by August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.

Prerequisites: CHI304H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: EAS401H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI404H5 • Advanced Chinese II

This course, designed for second-language learners of Mandarin Chinese, is the second half of Advanced Chinese. It continues to: 1) develop listening and speaking skills in handling most informal and some formal communicative tasks; 2) strengthen reading and writing skills in expository and persuasive essays on familiar cultural and social topics; and 3) cultivate cultural knowledge that facilitates effective intercultural communication. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…) by August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.

Prerequisites: CHI403H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: EAS402H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI408H5 • Reading Confucianism in Modern Chinese

This advanced level course covers seminal readings on Confucianism written in modern Chinese language. The course examines Confucian doctrines and the development of Confucianism from ancient time to the contemporary era. Critical reading and essay writing skills will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI409H5 • Influence of Confucianism on Chinese Culture

This advanced level course discusses the cultural influence of Confucianism on Chinese writing, philosophy, religion, education, literature, customs, ethics, society and so forth. The readings covered in this course are mainly in modern Chinese language. Critical reading and essay writing skills will be stressed.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI410H5 • Modern Chinese Literature Studies

This seminar course offers a critical examination of modern Chinese literature. modern Chinese literature. The primary focus will be on representative works of poetry, prose, drama, and fiction. Discussions will emphasize historical, cultural, and social-political contexts. Emphasis will be placed on building writing skills in literary criticism and analyzing literary devices and themes.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5
Exclusions: EAS284H1 or EAS309H1 or EAS334H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI411H5 • Theory and Practice in English/Chinese Translation

This course is an introduction to the major theories, methods and techniques involved in translating from English into Chinese. The course focuses on practical training for novice translators. Through practice, students will familiarize themselves with the translation process and develop a variety of translation skills and strategies. Students will discuss and reflect upon issues encountered during translation and develop decision-making ability to deal with translation challenges. This course provides a solid foundation for students to continue their studies in translation at the advanced level.


Prerequisites: CHI211H5
Exclusions: ECTB61H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM101H5 • The Science of Human Health

This course is intended for humanities and social science students who wish to gain knowledge of the science behind our well-being that may help them to make personal, social and political decisions in their future. Chemistry will be taught on a need-to-know basis in order to consider some contemporary applications. The course will focus on three themes in the realm of human health: nutrition for the prevention of disease, diagnostic tests for the detection of disease and drug discovery for the treatment of disease. Among the questions that may be addressed are "What is the nutritional difference between vitamins from foods and those from supplements?", "Should ketchup be considered a vegetable?", "How do diagnostic strips work?", "What advances in microfluidics have provided inexpensive diagnostics for use in remote areas?", "How are drug targets identified?", and "What is the path from drug discovery to bringing a drug to market?". The roles of nutritional, analytical and medicinal chemistry in these processes will be studied. (Please note the course exclusion: Students are ineligible to register for this course if they have taken any previous or current CHM/JCP course).

Exclusions: CHM201H5 and any CHM/JCP course taken previously or concurrently

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class, Hybrid

CHM110H5 • Chemical Principles 1

Matter and its transformations are studied at the macroscopic level. Topics include stoichiometry, phases of matter, equilibria, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.

Prerequisites: Grade 12 Chemistry (SCH4U) (minimum grade of 70) and Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U0) (minimum grade of 70) and Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U) highly recommended
Corequisites: Recommended Corequisite: (MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5); this recommended corequisite is a prerequisite for all 200 level CHM courses.
Exclusions: CHM135H1 or CHM151Y1 or CHM140Y5 or CHMA11H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM120H5 • Chemical Principles 2

Building on the subject matter of CHM110H5, molecular events are studied at the microscopic level. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, intermolecular forces of attraction, reaction kinetics, and organic chemical reactions and mechanisms.

Prerequisites: CHM110H5
Corequisites: Recommended Corequisite: (MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5); this recommended corequisite is a prerequisite for all 200 level CHM courses.
Exclusions: CHM136H1 or CHM151Y1 or CHM140Y5 or CHMA10H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM211H5 • Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry

A rigorous introduction to the theory and practice of analytical chemistry. Development and applications of basic statistical concepts in treatment and interpretation of analytical data; direct and indirect precipitations; volumetric methods; acid-base, complexometric, redox and precipitation titrations; introduction to instrumental methods; potentiometry and absorption spectroscopy. Applications in biomedical, forensic and environmental areas will be considered.

Prerequisites: CHM110H5 and a minimum grade of 60% in CHM120H5 and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5)]
Exclusions: CHM217H1 or CHMB16H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM231H5 • Inorganic Chemistry I

Atomic structure; periodic properties of the elements; bonding theories-ionic, covalent (valence bond and molecular orbital) and metallic; structure and bonding in coordination compounds of main group elements and transition metals; descriptive chemistry of the metals. Reaction mechanisms.

Prerequisites: CHM110H5 and a minimum grade of 60% in CHM120H5 and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5)].
Exclusions: CHM238Y1 or CHMB31H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/10T/28P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM242H5 • Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Fundamentals of organic chemistry emphasizing reactions of alkanes and alkenes. The first half of a two-course sequence (with CHM243H5) required in the Chemistry major and specialist programs.

Prerequisites: CHM110H5 and a minimum grade of 60% in CHM120H5 and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5)].
Exclusions: CHM136H1 or CHMB41H3 or CHMB43Y3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM243H5 • Introductory Organic Chemistry II

The chemistry of benzene, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid, esters, acid chlorides, amides and amines will be covered. As well, electrophilic aromatic substitution, protection and deprotection of alcohols, nucleophilic acyl substitution, nucleophilic addition, carbonyl alpha-substitution reaction, keto-enol tautomerism, carbonyl condensation and amines will be introduced. The emphasis will be on organic mechanisms and application of organic reactions to multistep synthesis. Continues from CHM242H5.

Prerequisites: CHM242H5
Exclusions: CHM247H1 or CHM249H1 or CHMB42H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. This course does not count as one of the requirements in the Chemistry Minor, Chemistry Major, Chemistry Specialist or Biological Chemistry Specialist programs. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 4.0 credits and no more than 10.0 credits, which must include CHM110H5 and CHM120H5 with a minimum grade of 60% and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5)].

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM311H5 • Instrumental Analytical Chemistry

Introduction to the basic theory and practice underlying important techniques in analytical chemistry, chosen from three major areas of instrumental analysis: spectroscopy, electrochemistry and separation science. Specific topics will include fluorescence spectroscopy, atomic spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, voltammetry, high resolution gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and a brief introduction to computer applications, including Fourier transform methods. A problem-based approach will be used to explore these methods in a wide variety of practical applications, which will include individualized student assignments.

Prerequisites: CHM211H5
Exclusions: CHM317Y1 or (CHMC16H3 and CHMC11H3)
Recommended Preparation: JCP221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM323H5 • Introduction to Computational Chemistry

This course covers the foundations of computational chemistry with a focus on practical applications and does not require a background in programming or quantum mechanics. An array of methods for predicting the structural, electronic, thermodynamic, and spectroscopic properties of chemical species will be addressed, as well as how the calculated results can complement experimental observations. Relevant fundamental theories to computational chemistry will be covered on a need-to-know basis. Students will follow an individualized study path and select the chemical systems to which each method will be applied.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Recommended Preparation: CHM231H5 and JCP221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM331H5 • Inorganic Chemistry II: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Chemistry of metallic elements. Organometallics. Main group and transition elements. Rings, cages and clusters. Lanthanides and Actinides. Applications of IR, UV-VIS and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. Symmetry. Inorganic synthesis. Non-aqueous solvents. Structure and bonding. Catalysis and industrial processes.

Prerequisites: CHM231H5 and CHM242H5
Corequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM338H1 or CHMC31Y3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM333H5 • Bioinorganic Chemistry

Principles of inorganic chemical reactions and their application to biochemical systems: kinetics, mechanisms and thermodynamics of ligand exchange, acid-base and redox reactions involving metalloproteins and their model compounds; mechanisms of catalysis by metalloenzymes and their model compounds; metal ion related diseases; metals in chemotherapy.

Prerequisites: CHM231H5 and CHM242H5
Corequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM437H1 or CHMD69H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM341H5 • Organic Chemistry: Mechanism and Structure

Stereochemistry and conformational analysis; mechanisms of important types of organic reaction; pericyclic reactions; reactive intermediates.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM348H1 or CHMC41H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM345H5 • Organic Synthesis

Methods used for forming carbon-carbon bonds will be reviewed, including reactions of the various types of nucleophilic carbon and the use of organometallic reagents. Other topics include functional group interconversions, oxidation and reduction and the role of elements such as boron, silicon and tin in organic synthesis.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM342H1 or CHMC42H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM347H5 • Organic Chemistry of Biological Compounds

The chemistry of selected classes of naturally occurring molecules such as those below, with emphasis on structure, stereochemistry, properties and synthesis. Amino acids, peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleosides, nucleotides, and nucleic acids.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM347H1 or CHMC47H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM361H5 • Structural Biochemistry

An introduction to the molecular anatomy and properties of the major cellular biomolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. The course also covers the structural organization of membranes and other macromolecular complexes. Enzyme mechanisms and membrane transport phenomena will be examined in the context of quantitative analyses these processes and of structure/function relationships.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: BCH210H1 or BCH242Y1 or BCH311H1 or BIOC12H3 or CHMB62H3
Recommended Preparation: BIO206H5 and JCP221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM362H5 • Metabolism and Bioenergetics

Basic principles of biological energetics. Metabolic pathways for carbohydrate and lipid synthesis and degradation. Survey of amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. Integration and cellular regulation of metabolism. Intracellular signal transduction mechanisms.

Prerequisites: CHM361H5
Exclusions: BCH210H1 or BCH242Y1 or BIOC13H3 or CHMB62H3
Recommended Preparation: BIO206H5 and JCP221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM372H5 • Techniques in Biological Chemistry I

The first in a sequence of two laboratory courses intended to complement CHM361H5 and CHM362H5. Experiments are designed to familiarize students with techniques commonly used to study the chemical and physical properties of biological molecules. Topics covered in the first half also include a wide range of chromatographic and/or fractionation methods to separate proteins and/or subcellular organelles, enzyme kinetics, electrophoresis to study proteins and their complexes. The theoretical basis for each experiment will be covered in a 1-hour lecture each week.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Corequisites: CHM361H5
Exclusions: CHM371H5 or BCH370H1 or BCH371H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM373H5 • Techniques in Biological Chemistry II

The second in a sequence of two laboratory courses intended to complement CHM361H5 and CHM362H5. CHM373H5 carries on from CHM372H5 with a particular emphasis on protein purification, enzyme kinetics and protein characterization (e.g., kinetics, reactions, binding, depending on the protein studied). Techniques covered include classic biochemical techniques used in studying proteins and protein complexes, such as chromatography and fluorescence methods. The theoretical basis for each experiment will be covered in a 1-hour lecture each week.


Prerequisites: CHM372H5
Corequisites: CHM361H5
Exclusions: CHM371H5 or BCH370H1 or BCH371H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM394H5 • Chemical Synthesis Laboratory I

The first in a sequence of two laboratory courses in synthetic chemistry. This laboratory course comprises the synthesis of inorganic and organic compounds supplemented by physical measurements (e.g., ir, uv, 1H NMR spectra, magnetic susceptibility, etc.) of the products where appropriate. Approximately six weeks each will be spent on two groups of foundational experiments, one in organic and one in inorganic synthesis to illustrate techniques of chemical synthesis. The central role of the carbonyl group in organic synthesis is elaborated, an organic unknown is identified both chemically and spectroscopically and the synthetic chemistry of the first row transition elements is explored.

Prerequisites: CHM231H5 and CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM393H5Y

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM395H5 • Chemical Synthesis Laboratory II

The second in a sequence of two laboratory courses in synthetic chemistry that builds on the foundations established in CHM394H5. Students choose their own experiments in this course from offerings comprising the synthesis of organic, organometallic and inorganic compounds and in computational chemistry. Techniques such as working at low temperatures and in inert atmospheres (e.g., glove box) are introduced. Depending on the experiments actually chosen, a mixed organic unknown is separated and identified, organic rearrangements and the synthetic chemistry of elements from across the Periodic Table including main group, transition elements and lanthanides are explored. A highlight is an optional four week independent synthesis project in any area of synthetic chemistry adapting procedures from the published, including recent, research literature.

Prerequisites: CHM394H5
Corequisites: (CHM331H5 or CHM333H5) and (CHM341H5 or CHM345H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM396H5 • Analytical and Physical Chemistry Instrumentation Laboratory I

This analytical and physical chemistry laboratory course represents an integration of the study of fundamental physical chemistry with wide-ranging applications to instrumental methods of analysis, such as separation science, electrochemistry and spectroscopy. The course will provide a solid hands-on grounding in many of the major topics covered in analytical and physical chemistry, and the optimization of instrumental analytical measurements by the application of physical principles. Students select from a variety of instruments to customize their program, and develop their own analytical methods to address analytical problems of interest to the student.

Prerequisites: CHM211H5 and JCP221H5
Exclusions: CHM391H5 or CHM317H1 or CHM410Y1 or CHMC16H3
Recommended Preparation: CHM311H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM397H5 • Analytical and Physical Chemistry Instrumentation Laboratory II

This analytical and physical chemistry laboratory course carries on from CHM396 to introduce more advanced topics in instrumental methods of analysis and physical chemistry concepts. The course will include experimental modules focused on instrument design and computer interfacing, molecular spectroscopy (e.g. fluorescence, infrared and Raman, and NMR), plasmon resonance methods for biomolecule determinations and kinetic analysis, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technologies. The course will provide practical experience in the optimization of instrumental analytical measurements, experiment design, and topics of relevance to research in analytical and physical chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHM396H5
Corequisites: CHM311H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides third-year undergraduate students (after completion of 8.0 credits) who have developed some knowledge of Chemistry and its research methods, an opportunity to work in the research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled have the opportunity to become involved in original research, enhance their research skills and share in the excitement of acquiring new knowledge and in the discovery process of science. This course does not count as one of the requirements in the Chemistry Minor program. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: 8.0 credits, including CHM110H5 and CHM120H5 with a minimum grade of 60% and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5)] and 2.0 credit of CHM/ JCP at the 200-level.

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM412H5 • Sensors, Sequencers, and Diagnostic Technologies

An exploration of biomolecule analysis methodologies, with an emphasis on nucleic acid analysis, will be done from the perspective of the Analytical Biochemist. The course will begin with brief reviews of the structure and function of biomolecules, solid-phase synthesis, extraction, pre-concentration and amplification methods. This will be followed by an exploration of established and emerging techniques for target biomolecule determinations, including: bioprobes, microarrays, biosensors and DNA sequencing technologies (including single molecule approaches). Current examples of implementation in the fields of proteomics and genomics will be discussed throughout the course, with an emphasis on life sciences and diagnostic testing applications. Course work will include independent literature reviews and student presentations.

Prerequisites: CHM311H5
Recommended Preparation: CHM243H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM414H5 • Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry

An overview of both recent and fundamental developments of instrumentation that are revolutionizing the field of analytical chemistry, with an emphasis on applications in biological chemistry and biotechnology. Topics will include a survey of advanced analytical techniques, including specialized mass spectrometry techniques, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, Electron Microscopy, Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy, Localized surface plasmon resonance, total internal reflection fluorescence methods; chemometrics, and other state-of-the-art analytical methods. Course work will include independent review of peer-reviewed literature, scientific writing, and student oral presentations

Prerequisites: CHM311H5
Recommended Preparation: JCP321H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM416H5 • Separations, Chromatography and Microfluidics

Separation science will be explored by building on a survey of fundamental physical principles to understand processes of extraction, and technologies such as solid phase microextraction, supercritical fluid extraction, immunoaffinity extraction and molecularly imprinted polymers. Plate and rate theory will be developed to consider various forms of gas and liquid chromatographic methods, including hyphenated techniques that bridge to information detectors such as mass spectrometers. New opportunities for chromatography and separations by movement to small scale size will be considered by focusing on microfluidics, electro-osmotic flow and chip based microdevice applications. Applications examples will focus on problems in life sciences, forensics and environmental chemistry. Course work will include independent literature reviews and student presentations.

Prerequisites: CHM311H5
Exclusions: CHM416H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM436H5 • Metal-based Chemistry for Synthesis of Small Molecules and Functional Materials

Modern metal-mediated (inorganic) reactions useful in organic synthesis. Applications of advanced organometallic chemistry. Selected solid-state compounds: metal-organic frameworks, nanoparticles and related materials for separation, catalysis, diagnostics.

Prerequisites: CHM231H5 and CHM243H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM442H5 • Strategy & Control in Modern Drug Synthesis

Applications of advanced fundamentals to, and recent developments in, multi-step organic synthesis.

Prerequisites: CHM341H5 or CHM345H5
Recommended Preparation: CHM394H5 and CHM395H

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM444H5 • An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Recognition

An introduction to drug discovery, design and development. This course will focus on the potential of proteins (enzymes, receptors, receptor structure and signal transduction) as targets for molecular therapeutic intervention. The strategies of finding a drug target, optimizing target interactions and synthetic molecular therapeutic development will all be considered and discussed. The modern technologies of targeting protein-protein interactions will also be covered.

Prerequisites: CHM361H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM462H5 • Revealing the Chemistry behind Biomolecules

Discussion course based on published research in biological chemistry and applications of chemistry to study processes of biological significance.

Prerequisites: CHM361H5
Recommended Preparation: CHM347H5 and CHM371H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM485H5 • Dissertation Based on Literature Research

A dissertation will be written based on literature research of a topic of current interest in the field of chemistry. The research will be conducted under the supervision of a chemistry faculty member other than the student's CPS489Y5 supervisor. The research topic must not overlap that of the student's CPS489Y5 project. The goals of this course are to achieve literature research expertise as well as in-depth knowledge of a particular chemistry topic, while perfecting scientific writing and oral presentation skills. Evaluation is based on a final written report describing the aims and results of the research, as well as an oral presentation of the work. The course is normally taken in the student's fourth year, in either the Fall or Winter terms, but may be taken in the Summer term. Enrolment in CHM485H5 requires submitting an application to the department before the end of the term prior to that in which it is intended to undertake the research. Independent Studies Application Forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Applications should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration on ACORN is also required. Students are encouraged to consult with, and obtain the consent of, prospective supervisors before applying for enrolment. 

Prerequisites: 2.5 CHM/JCP credits at 300 level.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM489Y5 • Introduction to Research in Chemistry

An experimental or theoretical research topic in chemistry will be investigated under the supervision of a chemistry faculty member other than the student's CHM485H5 supervisor. The research topic must not overlap that of the student's CHM485H5 research topic. In addition to learning to plan, conduct and evaluate a research program, students will receive training in written and oral presentation skills. Evaluation is based on interim and final written reports describing the aims and results of the research, as well as interim and final oral presentations of the work. The course is normally taken in the student's fourth year. Enrolment in CHM489Y5 requires submitting an application to the department in the spring term, with the application due date being the final day of classes. Independent Studies Application Forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Applications should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration on ACORN is also required. Acceptance into the course is dependent on the student having achieved a satisfactory GPA, and reaching agreement with a potential supervisor. Students must consult with prospective supervisors before applying for enrolment, and must list at least two faculty members as possible supervisors. This course is restricted to students in the Chemistry Major, Biological Chemistry Specialist, and Chemistry Specialist Programs.

Prerequisites: 2.0 300 level credits in CHM/JCP and 1.0 credit from BIO206H5 and BIO314H5 and CHM372H5 and CHM373H5 and CHM394H5 and CHM395H5 and CHM396H5 and CHM397H5 and PHY324H5, with 0.5 credits from the 300-level CHM laboratory courses listed.
Exclusions: CHM499Y1 or JCB487Y5 or CHMD90Y3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 240P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN101H5 • An Introduction to Cinema Studies

Introduction to film analysis, concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Exclusions: INI115Y1 or NEW115Y1 or VIC115Y1 or ERI201H5 or ERI202H5 or CIN202H5 or CIN205Y5 or CIN105H1 or ENGB70H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN102H5 • Modernity and the Moving Image

Looking at a few periods of intense technological change—for example, with the invention of photography, and the introduction of sound, of colour, of television—we will consider the ways in which artists, filmmakers, studios, and media conglomerates have responded to such changes and to accompanying ideas about the role that moving technology plays in our conception of history and the future.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN203H5 • The Films of Alfred Hitchcock

The establishment of film as a serious art form is coincident with the earliest critical writing on Alfred Hitchcock that emerged in the 1950s. Since then, Hitchcock has remained one of the most important filmmakers of all time, spawning not only a massive body of critical scholarship but also legions of imitators. This course will serve as an introduction to both the films (such as Psycho and North by Northwest) and related issues: questions of suspense, authorship, morality, and spectatorship.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 or CIN202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN204H5 • The Films of Martin Scorsese

This course will examine the films of Martin Scorsese, one of the most influential figures in the history of cinema. Scorsese's films will be understood in relation to questions about imitation and originality, genre, violence, male hysteria, and also as meditations on the history of film itself.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 or CIN202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN205H5 • Canadian Auteurs

This course will offer a comparative study of a selection of major contemporary Canadian filmmakers, including Denys Arcand, Atom Egoyan, David Cronenberg, Sara Polley, Denis Villeneuve, Ruba Nadda, Denis Côté, Guy Maddin, Michael Snow, and Joyce Wieland.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 or CIN202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN206H5 • Auteurs

This course will look closely at the work of a single director. Emphasis will be given to the aesthetic, historical, cultural, and philosophical contexts that inform the director's work. We will also tend closely to the style and central preoccupations of the director under examination.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

CIN207H5 • East Asian Cinema

This course is an introduction to East Asian cinema from the 1960s to the present, including films from Hong Kong, Taiwan, China, Japan, and Korea. With an emphasis on formal aesthetic analysis of short and feature-length films, we will examine film waves, genres, film festivals, and interconnected film industries. Throughout the course, we will consider not only the production, exhibition, and reception spaces of East Asian cinema but also critically examine its definitions and borders.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN208H5 • The Films of Abbas Kiarostami: Being and Movement

This course will survey the work of the Iranian filmmaker, Abbas Kiarostami, and will do so with an especial interest in the way that Kiarostami’s films raise important questions about tradition, judgment, and the fluidity of self and world.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN210H5 • Contemporary Southeast Asian Cinemas

This course is an introduction to contemporary Southeast Asian cinemas from the 2000s to the present. Since the turn of the millennium, the cinematic innovation of Southeast Asia has been aided by an increase in productive interaction and transnational modes of collaborations and co-productions. These waves of cinema augur new possibilities for considering cross-cultural, cross-boundary ways of being, seeing and knowing that can challenge formulaic and essentialist understandings of the region. Through formal aesthetic analysis of short and feature-length films, and the study of Asia-based and international institutions of cinema, we will examine the multifarious potential of contemporary Southeast Asian in spurring the rethinking of the histories, concepts, and borders of the region.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN215H5 • Bollywood in Context

India has arguably the most popular and prolific film industry in the world. This course contextualizes the relatively recent 'Bollywood' phenomenon within the history of Indian commercial cinema and key aspects of modern Indian culture, emphasizing the popular cinema's role in constructing historically changing ideas of national and gendered identity. It also challenges the assumptions of film theories developed in relation to Hollywood or European cinema by introducing film theory concepts that address South Asian image-cultures (such as darshan, frontality, melodrama, and interruption).

Exclusions: VCC390H5, Topic: Bollywood (Winter 2009 and Fall 2009), CIN302H5 (Fall 2013)
Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) and (VCC101H5 or VCC201H5)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN250H5 • Introduction to the Fundamentals of Cinematic Language

This hands-on studio-based course will examine fundamentals of cinematic language and production. Students will work individually and in teams to create a series of works that focus on aesthetics and skill development. 24L, 12T, 24P


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN290H5 • Topics in Cinema Studies

The course may have a historical, genre, theoretical, auteur, or other focus. See the Department of Visual Studies website at www.utm.utoronto.ca/dvs for the current topic.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN301H5 • Topics in Cinema Studies

The course may have a historical, genre, theoretical, auteur, or other focus. Students should contact the program director for the current topic.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) or at least 1.0 credits in courses that count toward Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN302H5 • Topics in Cinema Studies

The course may have a historical, genre, theoretical, auteur, or other focus. Students should contact the program director for the current topic.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) or at least 1.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN303H5 • Global Auteurs

This course is devoted to three major international filmmakers: Michael Haneke (Austria), Olivier Assayas (France), and Hou Hsiao-Hsien (Taiwan). While different in many important respects, these filmmakers are nevertheless linked by their tendency to make international films that are themselves meditations on national identity in an increasingly globalized world. Screenings will include Caché, Code Unknown, Carlos, Demonlover, The Flight of the Red Balloon, and Goodbye South, Goodbye, to name just a few.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) or (VCC101H5 or VCC201H5)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN304H5 • The Violent Image

It is commonly believed that violent images produce violent, or desensitized people. In this class, we will examine the multiple forms of violence in film, television, and videogames as well as the variety of discourses about violence and images. Rather than confirming the moral logic of condemnation of the violent image, we will ask instead what good a violent image might do.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5 or CIN205Y5) or at least 1.0 credit in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN305H5 • Taiwan New Wave in Our Time

The film In Our Time (1982), which combined short works by four directors (Edward Yang, Jim Tao, Ke Yizheng, and Zhang Yi), is regarded as the beginning of Taiwan New Cinema, generally considered to have ended in the late 1980s. Figures such as Hou Hsiao Hsien, Wang Tung, Chu Tien-wen, Wu Nien-Jen, Hung Hung, Hsiao Yeh, Tsai Chin, and Sylvia Chang played key roles, as directors, screenwriters, producers, and/or actors. From examining films within the era to their impact on contemporary global cinema, this course asks: how may a film be transnationally and transgenerationally re-animated for shifting eras and constellations of viewers? This course speculates that the time of the Taiwan New Wave is still beckoning, even from beyond the contested shores of Taiwan.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 or at least 1.0 credit in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN306H5 • The Comedic Image

Comedies routinely depend on the performance of the unthinkable in the ordinary. Our laughter follows from the saying or doing of the unsayable and the undoable. Comedy is in this way both a form of bad manners and also a uniquely philosophical genre, insofar as saying the unsayable means that we are able to recognize more than what we see or typically say. This course will survey the history of comedy and its relation to thought, perception, and social values.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) or at least 1.0 credits in courses that count toward the Cinema Studies minor.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN307H5 • Movement

Since the advent of cinema, filmmakers and film theorists have repeatedly attempted to define film as a unique art form on the basis of its most defining characteristic: movement. Painters can represent movement, but film is movement itself. Not surprisingly, many filmmakers who are recognized as significant artists are most easily identified by the distinctive style of their camera movement. This class will be devoted to a consideration of the nature, meaning, and styles of movement in film.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) or (VCC101H5 or VCC201H5)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN308H5 • East and Southeast Asian Cinemas of Migration

Migration, voluntary and involuntary, has intensified in an unprecedented manner in recent history. More than ever, it is critical to examine forms of proximity, hospitality, and regionality. Including films by migrants, films about the migrant experience, and the migratory routes of cinema itself, this course addresses the ethics, politics, and praxis of mobility and displacement. How, through East and Southeast Asian cinemas, could we envision counter-bodies and counter-strategies with which we may collectively imagine and inhabit the world?

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 or at least 1.0 credit in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN309H5 • Colour and the Moving image

Considering philosophical, scientific, and historical discourses about colour, this course explores a variety of ways of analyzing colour style in film and video art. As we begin to come to terms with the perceptual instability of colour as a positive phenomenon, we will consider how and why dominant histories of film style have been written, especially as the taming of colour has been central to an ongoing categorical distinction between narrative cinema and the avant-garde, morality and hedonism.

Exclusions: CIN401H5 (Winter 2021)
Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 and at least 1.0 credit in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN310H5 • Melodrama

Film and Televisual melodramas regularly enact a conflict between personal desire and social expectation. This course will cover a range of films and television melodramas and consider the social contexts in which these works emerge, and often as critiques of the very cultures to which they belong or reject. 24L, 36P

Exclusions: CIN301H5 Topics course Melodrama.
Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 and at least 1.0 credit in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN315H5 • From Script to Screen

This is a screenwriting course where students will be introduced to key narrative tools, scriptwriting conventions and components so they can develop an understanding and appreciation of the process from script to screen. From a comparative analysis of screenplays and completed short and feature films with varying budgets in the global cinema landscape, students will learn to use freely available specialized software to craft their own short film materials, including logline, synopsis, treatment, and screenplay.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN317H5 • Production: Independent Cinema

What can the title cards and credits of a film tell us about its journey to the screen? Outside of the studio system model adopted in various countries, there are established pathways and structures for the development, financing, production, sales, distribution and exhibition of independent cinema. This class asks how, from idea to completion, an independent film is able to find funding and reach an international audience. Focusing on the transnational ecosystems that sustain the passage of independent cinema around the world, we will examine case studies of films from Asia, Europe and North America.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their third year or beyond to work on the research project of a professor in Cinema Studies in return for 399Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, enhance their research skills, and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter session on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN400H5 • Topics in Cinema Studies

The course may have a historical, genre, theoretical, auteur, or other focus. Students should contact the Department for the current topic.  Topic-specific pre-requisites, co-requisites, and exclusions may apply to this course, depending on the topic. Please see the UTM Timetable prior to course registration.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or at least 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN401H5 • Topics in Cinema Studies

The course may have a historical, genre, theoretical, auteur, or other focus. Students should contact the Department for the current topic.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or at least 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN402H5 • Avant-Garde Film and Video

This course will look at alternative forms of filmmaking and television production. If there is a defining feature of avant-garde film and video, it is a general resistance to the thematic and stylistic norms of mainstream production and popular culture as way of seeing for all. Thus, in this course, we will be looking at both highly personal and sometimes autobiographical works of art.

Prerequisites: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) and 1.0 credits at the 300 level in CIN or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN403H5 • Queerscapes, Screenscapes, Escapes: Gender and Sexuality Across East and Southeast Asian Cinemas

"Queerness is not yet here." José Esteban Muñoz begins Cruising Utopia with the provocation that queerness is a mode of desire that allows for an escape from the conditions of the present. How does queer studies contribute to the building of and the continued hope for a more just world? Through cinema, theory, and philosophy, this course makes the claim that investigating queerness in the world marks a critical move away from restrictive modes of identification and holds open life's horizons of possibility. Course texts emphasize queer cinemas of Asia and their transnational connections.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or at least 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN404H5 • Film Noir and the Problem of Style

By way of an introduction to some of the key instances of film noir, this course is concerned with what we will call the paradox of style; namely, that style can indicate both what is specific and also what is general, what is unique and what is repeatable. We will look at the way in which this paradox is amplified by issues of gender, genre, fashion, and power that seem to concern so many films in this tradition.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or at least 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.
Exclusions: CIN401H5 (Winter 2012, Winter 2015, Winter 2017, Winter 2018)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN405H5 • Cinema and Emotion

This interdisciplinary course looks at such difficult emotions as shame, jealousy, forgiveness, and love, and how film complicates our understanding of them.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or at least 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.
Exclusions: CIN401H5 (Winter 2013)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN408H5 • Potential Cinema: Theories, Visions, and Practices of Decoloniality from East and Southeast Asia

Inspired by Ariella Aïsha Azoulay's Potential History: Unlearning Imperialism, this course investigates films from East and Southeast Asia and considers the ways in which we might recognize theories, visions, and practices that might constitute "cinemas of decoloniality." In this course, we will look to filmmakers' aesthetic engagement with archival and imagined time and the collision of pasts, presents, and futures in order to consider how contentious histories of memory and forgetting can have effects on the politics of the present. How, through and with cinema, could there be space not only to retell and reframe histories of coloniality and decolonization but also to experience and practice the potential decolonization of ways of being, seeing, and thinking?

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or a minimum 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN410H5 • Creating Mobile Cinemas

This class will introduce students to low-budget aesthetic approaches to cinema across fiction and documentary genres. The class will involve a hybrid of cinema research and creation. During the first half of the semester, we will study a selection of feature-length works and shorts. The second half of the semester will be dedicated towards students creating 10-15 minute pieces of their own inspired by what they have studied.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 and 1.0 at the 300/400-level in CIN

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN430H5 • Making a Short Film

This is a production course that introduces students to the four stages of filmmaking: development, production, post production, and release. Through learning the practical aspects of filmmaking such as scriptwriting, budgeting, key crew positions, basic technical proficiency of equipment, and understanding the film festival circuit and online platform, students will make a 5-10 minute fiction short film. Equipment and funds will not be provided but students will be able to complete the assignments on a smartphone with recommendation of free video editing software.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 and 1.0 credit at the 300/400-level in CIN

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA101H5 • Introduction to Classical Civilization

An introduction to ancient Greco-Roman civilization that highlights some of the most salient artistic, cultural, historical, and social achievements of these two societies.

Exclusions: CLA160H1 or CLAA04H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA201H5 • Latin and Greek in Scientific Terminology

The study of technical and scientific terms derived from Latin and Greek: word elements, formation, analysis. The course is designed to give students in any field of specialization a better grasp of the derivation and basic meaning of English words formed from Latin and Greek elements.

Exclusions: CLA201H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

CLA204H5 • Introduction to Classical Mythology

A survey of the myths and legends of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean world in ancient art and literature. Consideration may also be given to their reception in modern art and literature and some modern theories of myth.

Exclusions: CLA204H1 or CLAB05H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

CLA207H5 • Introduction to Greek and Roman Literature

This course provides an introduction to Greek and Roman literature. Detailed interpretations of key works from a variety of genres are complemented by discussions of more general issues like literacy levels, orality, literary rhetoric, performance contexts and intertextuality.

Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA220H5 • Introduction to Greek and Roman Archaeology

This course introduces students to archaeology in the ancient Mediterranean, covering key archaeological methods and material from the Greek Bronze Age through the Roman Empire. Students develop essential skills to recognize and analyze ancient material culture.

Exclusions: CLA210H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA230H5 • Introduction to Greek History

An introduction to the diverse history of the Greek world, tracing mainly political but also social developments from the Bronze Age of the mid-second millennium BCE to the first century CE.

Exclusions: CLA230H1 or CLAB05H3
Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA231H5 • Introduction to Roman History

An introduction to the history of Rome, focusing mainly on its political and military history but also tracing the most salient social and cultural developments, from its inconspicuous beginnings in the eighth century BCE to Rome's Mediterranean Empire in the imperial period and its dissolution in the sixth century CE.

Exclusions: CLA231H1 or CLAB06H3
Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA233H5 • Introduction to Roman Culture & Society

An introduction to the cultural and social history of ancient Rome and those living in the Roman world. Topics may vary from year to year but include daily life and demography, the Roman family, gender and sexuality, the Roman political system and the army, religion, Roman entertainments (the circus, gladiatorial games, the theatre), and Latin literature.

Exclusions: CLA233H1 or CLAB06H3
Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA234H5 • Ancient Science and Technology

A general introduction to early technology, its achievements and limitations, the origins and development of ancient science, including ancient medicine, and their interaction with philosophy.

Exclusions: CLA203H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

CLA237H5 • Introduction to Greek Culture & Society

An introduction to the society and culture of the ancient Greek world and those who were in contact with it. Topics may vary from year to year but include daily life and demography, social customs, gender and sexuality, literature, art, as well as religion and religious festivals (such as processions, theatrical performances and athletic competitions such as the Olympic Games).

Exclusions: CLA232H1 or CLAB05H3
Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5 or CLA204H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early February. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Note:
This course may be substituted for 1.0 credits at the 300+ level.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 4.0 and not more than 9.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA300H5 • Greek Tragedy and Comedy

Greek drama from the origins of tragedy in the sixth century B.C. to New Comedy, with close study of selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander, and attention to Aristotle's Poetics.

Exclusions: CLA382H1 or CLA383H1 or CLAC01H3
Recommended Preparation: CLA204H5 or CLA237H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA301H5 • Greek Epic

The Iliad and the Odyssey, with comparative study of related texts.

Prerequisites: CLA204H5 or CLA230H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA236H1 or CLAC11H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA302H5 • Roman Epic

The Aeneid of Virgil and/or other Roman epics with comparative study of related texts.

Prerequisites: CLA204H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA236H1 or CLAC11H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA303H5 • The Ancient Novel

The human and social climate in which prose fiction arose; the Greek romances of love and adventure (Heliodorus, Longus, Chariton), and the more ironical and socially conscious works of the Roman writers (Petronius, The Satyricon, and Apuleius, The Golden Ass).

Prerequisites: CLA204H5 or CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA303H1 or CLAC12H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA307H5 • Greek and Roman Lyric Poetry

This course discusses Greek and Roman lyric poetry in its wider literary, cultural and political contexts. Poets who will be discussed include, among others, Sappho, Theocritus, Catullus and Horace. Some of the poems featured in this course belong to the best and most beautiful literature written in Graeco-Roman antiquity.

Prerequisites: CLA207H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA308H5 • Religion in the Ancient Greek World

A study of the religious cults and forms of worship current in the ancient Greek world. The course will consider religion in the ancient Greek city-states, but attention will also be paid to the so-called 'mystery religions', Greek beliefs about the afterlife, and intellectual reflection on religion in Greek literature.

Prerequisites: Prerequisite for CLA students: (CLA204H5 or CLA230H5 or CLA237H5) and for RLG students: any pertinent RLG course at the 200+ level.
Exclusions: CLA308H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA310H5 • Religion in the Roman Empire

A close study of the religious cults and forms of worship current in the Roman Empire during the first four centuries C.E. The course will concentrate on the so-called 'pagan' cults, but their interaction with Jews and the early Christians, as well as the rise of Christianity, will also be considered. Attention will also be paid to the imperial cult ("emperor worship"); the so-called 'mystery religions' and 'oriental religions'; the diversity of local religion across the empire; oracles, private religiosity and intellectual reflection on religion in the ancient Greek and Roman writers.

Prerequisites: Prerequisite for CLA students: (CLA231H5 or CLA233H5) and for RLG students: any pertinent RLG course at the 200+ level.
Exclusions: CLA310H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA319H5 • Women and Gender in Antiquity

A study of gender in the ancient Mediterranean, with a focus on female and male sexuality and socialization; their economic, religious, and political roles; and aspects of daily life.

Prerequisites: CLA204H5 or CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA219H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA320H5 • The Etruscans

A close study of the history, culture, society, religion, art and archaeology of the Etruscans (1000–100 BCE) and of their contacts with Greek and Roman society and culture.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA391H5 (Fall 2022)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA337H5 • Pompeii and Herculaneum: Everyday Life and Death in Roman Cities

Focusing on Roman Pompeii and Herculaneum, this course studies the experiences of townspeople: the freeborn (male and female), freed persons, and slaves; the demography of a Roman town and its public infrastructure; the interior design of Roman houses; local politics; leisure activities; economy; and religious beliefs and funerary practices.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA391H5 (Winter 2019)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA350H5 • The Trojan War: Archaeology and Myth

This course studies the unique place Troy and the Trojan War hold in Greek and Roman literary and historical imagination, archaeology, mythology, and art. The course also considers the afterlife of the Trojan War in post-Classical European culture, and its reception in modern film and fiction.

Prerequisites: CLA220H5 or CLA230H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA390H5 (Fall 2022);  CLA404H5 (Winter 2021)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA355H5 • Greek Sanctuaries: Archaeology and Ritual

This course explores the development and function of Greek sanctuaries, paying special attention to the archaeological evidence and the roles of sanctuaries in society. It studies major sanctuaries and their festivals and rituals (Delphi, Olympia, Athenian Acropolis, Eleusis, Samos, Ephesos), but also considers smaller sites in the Greek world.

Prerequisites: CLA220H5 OR CLA230H5 OR CLA237H5 OR CLA204H5
Exclusions: CLA390H5 (Fall 2021)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA359H5 • The Persian Empire: 559-331 BCE

This course offers an examination of the history and culture of the first multicultural superstate of the ancient world, the Achaemenid Empire. Through a close analysis of ancient sources, this course not only investigates governmental structures but also the daily life in the Eastern Mediterranean from the sixth to the fourth centuries BCE.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: NMC349H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA360H5 • Early Greece

This course offers an exploration into the early Greek world, tracing political, economical, and social developments from a world of local rulers in the second millennium BCE until the Persian Wars in the early fifth century BCE. An in-depth study of the many forms of available ancient sources will create a vivid picture of early Greek communities, of state organization, and society.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA362H1 or CLA363H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA361H5 • Classical Greece

A close study of the Greek Mediterranean world during the period, which already in antiquity, was described as 'Classical'. Through an in-depth study of ancient sources, this course explores the political, economic, social, religious and cultural developments of the Greek states in the time period from the Persian Wars in the early 5th century to the rise of Macedon in the second half of the fourth century BCE.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA335H5 or CLA363H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA362H5 • Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World

This course offers an in-depth study of the Hellenistic World from the reign of Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE to a Greek world under Roman dominance in the first century CE, spanning geographically from the Mediterranean basin via the Levant and Mesopotamia to modern-day Afghanistan. A close examination of different types of ancient sources will trace the political, cultural, economic and social developments of kings, regions and cities that shaped this period.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA347H5, CLA64H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA365H5 • Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean

This course explores questions of trade and exchange in the ancient Mediterranean. A close study of ancient primary material examines aspects of the ancient economy, trade goods, ships and shipwrecks, ports and harbours, and cross-cultural interaction.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA372H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA367H5 • The Roman Republic

A survey of the salient political, constitutional, social, economic, military, religious, and cultural developments in the Roman Republic, from the late sixth century to the final decades of the first century BC.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA367H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA368H5 • Augustus and the Julio-Claudians

A survey of the salient political, constitutional, social, economic, military, religious and cultural developments in the Roman Empire in the age of Augustus and during the reigns of the Julio-Claudian emperors (ca. 44 BCE- 68CE).

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA368H1
Recommended Preparation: CLA367H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA369H5 • The High Roman Empire, 68-305 CE

A survey of the salient political, constitutional, social, economic, military, religious and cultural developments in the Roman Empire, from the 'year of the four emperors' (68 CE) to the fourth century CE.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA369H1
Recommended Preparation: CLA368H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA370H5 • Late Antiquity

A survey of the salient political, constitutional, social, economic, military, religious and cultural developments in the Roman Empire from the fourth century to the age of Justinian.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA378H1
Recommended Preparation: CLA369H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA390H5 • Topics in Greek History & Culture

A detailed study of a topic of Greek history, literature, or material culture. Topics will vary from year to year. See Department of Historical Studies web site at https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/historical-studies/students/courses/topic-c… for more details.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA237H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA391H5 • Topics in Roman History & Culture

A detailed study of a topic of Roman history, literature, or material culture. Topics will vary from year to year. See Department of Historical Studies web site at https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/historical-studies/students/courses/topic-c… for more details.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA395H5 • Topics in Classics

An in-depth examination of historical issues. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See Department of Historical Studies web site at https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/historical-studies/students/courses/topic-c… for more details.

Prerequisites: At least 0.5 200 level credits in Classical Civilization.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA396H5 • The Ancient Mediterranean in Context

An in-depth examination of the historical issues and their relationships with specific regions in the ancient world and their monuments. Content in any given year depends on instructor. As part of this course, students will have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process. See the Department of Historical Studies website at https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/historical-studies/undergraduate-programs/classical-civilization/classical-civilization-topic-courses for more details.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

For senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods, this course offers an opportunity to work on the research project of a professor. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Project descriptions for the following fall-winter session are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 8.0, and not more than 10.0, credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA404H5 • Advanced Topics in Classics

A critical exploration of selected topics of Greek or Roman history, literature, philosophy, or material culture. Topics will vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: At least 2.5 credits in Classics, including at least 1.5 credits at the 300 level.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA497Y5 • Independent Reading

Student-initiated project of reading and research, supervised by a member of the Department. Primarily intended for students in a Major program. After obtaining a supervisor, a student must apply to the Department of Historical Studies. A maximum of 1.0 credit in a reading course is permitted.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA499H5 • Independent Reading

Student-initiated project of reading and research, supervised by a member of the Department. Primarily intended for Majors. After obtaining a supervisor, a student must apply to the Department of Historical Studies. A maximum of two reading courses, amounting to 1.0 credit, is permitted.

Prerequisites: At least 2.5 credits in Classics, including at least 1.5 credits at the 300 level.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA499Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

For senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods, this course offers an opportunity to work on the research project of a professor. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Project descriptions for the following fall-winter session are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 8.0, and not more than 10.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CPS398H5 • Teaching Opportunity Program in Sciences

A scholarly, active learning project in which students integrate and apply their understanding of science and pedagogy by observing, actively participating in, and reflecting on the teaching and learning process under the supervision of an experienced instructor/mentor. This course may be taken in either the Summer, Fall or Winter terms. Enrolment requires submitting an application to the department before the end of the term prior to that in which it is intended to undertake the research. Independent Studies Application Forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Students should plan for the course in March of the previous academic year and register as soon as their registration period begins. Students are encouraged to consult with, and obtain the consent of, prospective supervisors before applying for enrolment. Enrolment will depend on the availability of positions.

Prerequisites: This course is "by Instructor Approval". At least 10.0 courses completed and enrolment in a life, mathematical, or physical science major or specialist program; an average of B-(CGPA 2.7) or higher.

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 30L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CPS400Y5 • Chemical and Physical Sciences Internship

This internship opportunity will allow students to apply theoretical and practical skills acquired during their undergraduate education in order to gain vital industry experience. Students will be trained in effective job searching skills (writing a CV and a Cover Letter, participating in job interviews) and will gain valuable experiences that are sought after by employers in both public and private sectors. Students will be placed with various employers in the GTA based on their interest and skill set, and on the employer needs and availability. The placement is a 200 h unpaid internship. The Course Coordinator/Instructor(s) will schedule biweekly meetings to discuss the setup and progress of the student projects. Student attendance is mandatory. At the end of the term, students must submit a written report and prepare an oral presentation about the outcomes of their work experience. In order to be considered for the internship, students must apply for the course. The Course Coordinator will approve enrolment in the course based on the number of internship opportunities available, which will vary from year-to-year, and student qualifications (e.g. GPA, experience, qualifications related to the requirements of the available placement(s), and interview performance).

Prerequisites: For Chemistry Internships (CHM372H5 or CHM394H5 or CHM396H5) and an additional 1.0 credit from any 300/400 level CHM/JCP/JBC/BCH/FSC courses. For Earth Science/Geology Internships: (ERS301H5 and ERS303H5) and an additional 1.0 credit from any 300/400 level courses. For Physics Internships: (PHY324H5 and PHY347H5) and an additional 1.0 credit from any 300 or 400 level PHY/JCP courses.
Recommended Preparation: For Chemistry Internships: (CHM373H5 or CHM395H5 or CHM397H5) For Earth Science & Geology Internships: ERS302H5 and ERS311H5 and ERS401H5 For Physics Internships PHY325H5 and PHY332H5 and PHY333H5

Enrolment Limits: Students must be in their fourth year of study and registered in one of following Programs: Chemistry Major, Chemistry Specialist, Biological Chemistry Specialist, Earth Science Major, Earth Science Specialist, Geology Specialist, Physics Major, Biomedical Physics Specialist.
Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CPS401Y5 • Research and Development in Science Education

This course is intended for students in a CPS or Environmental Science Major or Specialist program. It provides an experiential learning opportunity with secondary school students and teachers. Students will research the literature of science pedagogy and acquire pedagogical content knowledge, particularly that of problem-based learning and the use of case studies. Then, through the creation of original, problem-based learning materials for Grades 11 and 12 classes and the preparation of teachers’ notes for these materials, they will enhance their subject specialization knowledge. They will then assist a teacher in implementing their materials in a school or, where the materials involve experiments, in the field or in the UTM teaching laboratories. The course is normally taken in the student's fourth year. Enrollment requires submitting an application to the CPS Department in the spring term, with the application due date being the final day of classes. Independent Studies Application Forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Applications should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration on ACORN is also required.

Prerequisites: Enrolment in a CPS or Environmental Science Major or Specialist program with a minimum CGPA of 2.7 and 9.0 credits, including at least 2.0 credits at the 200-level in CHM or ERS or ENV or GGR or PHY

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 240P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CPS489Y5 • Introduction to Research in the Chemical and Physical Sciences

Students will work toward the completion of an experimental or theoretical research project in an area of study within the chemical and physical sciences, namely, astronomy, chemistry, earth sciences or physics. Projects will be based on current trends in research and students will work to complete their projects with guidance provided by a team of facilitators and faculty advisors consisting of course coordinators and a researcher from the Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences. In addition to the rigorous development of research skills, the course will also provide students with training and practical experience in project management techniques and practical research, literary and communications skills development. CPS489Y5 requires submitting an application to the department Application forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Applications should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant.

Prerequisites: (2.0 credits at the 300 level from BIO or CHM or JBC or JCP or ERS or ESS or PHY) and (1.0 credit from BIO206H5 or BIO314H5 or CHM372H5 or CHM373H5 or CHM394H5 or CHM395H5 or CHM396H5 or CHM397H5 or ERS201H5 or ERS202H5 or PHY324H5 or PHY347H5 or JCP321H5 or JCP322H5 or PHY325H5 or PHY332H5 or PHY333H5 or PHY343H5 or PHY351H5)
Exclusions: BIO400Y5 or BIO481Y5 or CBJ481Y5 or CHM489Y5 or ERS470Y5 or ERS471H5 or ERS472H5 or PHY489Y5 or BCH472Y1 or BCH473Y1 or CHM499Y1 or CSB497H1 or CSB498Y1 or CSB499Y1 or ESS491H1 or ESS492Y1 or MGY480Y1 or PHY478H1 or PHY479Y1 or BIOD98Y3 or CHMD90Y3 or CHMD91H3 or ESSD09H3 or ESSD10H3 or PSCD10H3

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 240P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC104H5 • The Why and How of Computing

A broad introduction to the field of computer science, intended for non-computer scientists. Topics include: history of computing; digital information representations; computer chip logic design; cryptography; social issues in computing; operating systems; problem solving and algorithms; a challenging programming introduction. This is a rigorous course intended to teach computer science, and will not teach the use of any particular software products. A robust understanding of modern computers and their use is assumed.

Exclusions: any CSC course

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC108H5 • Introduction to Computer Programming

Structure of computers; the computing environment. Programming in a language such as Python. Program structure: elementary data types, statements, control flow, functions, classes, objects, methods, fields. List: searching, sorting and complexity.

Prerequisites: Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U).
Exclusions: CSC108H1 or CSC120H1 or CSCA08H3 or CSCA20H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 38L/24P
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class, Hybrid, Online (Summer only)

CSC148H5 • Introduction to Computer Science

Abstract data types and data structures for implementing them. Linked data structures. Encapsulation and information-hiding. Object-oriented programming. Specifications. Analyzing the efficiency of programs. Recursion. This course assumes programming experience in a language such as Python, C++, or Java, as provided by CSC108H5.

Prerequisites: CSC108H5
Exclusions: CSC148H1 or CSCA48H3 or CSC111H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 38L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC199H5 • Computer Science Seminar

Introduction to a topic of current interest in computer science intended for a general audience. Content will vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC207H5 • Software Design

An introduction to software design and development concepts, methods, and tools using a statically-typed object-oriented programming language such as Java. Topics from: version control, build management, unit testing, refactoring, object-oriented design and development, design patterns, advanced IDE usage, regular expressions, and reflection. Representation of floating-point numbers and introduction to numerical computation.

Prerequisites: 60% in CSC148H5 (Only CSC148H5 taken at the UTM campus will be accepted.)
Exclusions: CSC207H1 or CSCB07H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC209H5 • Software Tools and Systems Programming

Software tools and development in a Unix/Linux environment, using a machine-oriented programming language (typically C). Core topics: software tools (shell utilities and make), processes and program execution, the memory model, system calls, file processing, interprocess communication (pipes and signals), and an introduction to concurrency, including multithreading.

Prerequisites: CSC207H5
Exclusions: CSC209H1 or CSCB09H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC236H5 • Introduction to the Theory of Computation

Mathematical induction; correctness proofs for iterative and recursive algorithms; recurrence equations and their solutions (including the "Master Theorem"); introduction to automata and formal languages.

Prerequisites: CSC148H5 and MAT102H5
Exclusions: CSC236H1 or CSC240H1 or CSCB36H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC258H5 • Computer Organization

An introduction to computer organization and architecture, using a common CPU architecture. Core topics: data representations and computer arithmetic, processor organization, the memory hierarchy and caching, instruction set and addressing modes, and quantitative performance evaluation of computing systems. Students will program in assembly and will evaluate simulated processor architectures.

Note:
Students wishing to complete CSC385H1 (Microprocessor Systems) should consider enrolling in CSC258H1 and/or to self-study the use of hardware design languages to create digital logic.

Prerequisites: CSC148H5
Exclusions: CSC258H1 or CSCB58H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC263H5 • Data Structures and Analysis

Algorithm analysis: worst-case, average-case, and amortized complexity. Standard abstract data types, such as graphs, dictionaries, priority queues and disjoint sets. A variety of data structures for implementing these abstract data types, such as balanced search trees, hashing, heaps and disjoint forests. Design, implementation and comparison of data structures. Introduction to lower bounds.

Prerequisites: CSC207H5 and CSC236H5 and (STA107H5 or STA246H5 or STA256H5 or STA237H1 or STA238H1 or ECO227Y5 or ECE286H1)
Exclusions: CSC263H1 or CSC265H1 or CSCB63H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC290H5 • Communication Skills for Computer Scientists

Targeted instruction and significant practice in the communications required for careers in computer science. The curriculum covers written, oral and interpersonal communication. Students will hand in short pieces of writing each week, will make oral presentations several times in the semester, and will work together in simulated project meetings and other realistic scenarios of pair and small group interaction. This can be used to satisfy the writing requirement in CSC programs.

Prerequisites: CSC148H5
Exclusions: CSC290H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC299H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in t