ANT101H5 • Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Anthropology is the global and holistic study of human biology and behaviour, and includes four subfields: biological anthropology, archaeology, sociocultural anthropology and linguistic anthropology. The material covered is directed to answering the question: What makes us human? This course is a survey of biological anthropology and archaeology.

Exclusions: ANT100Y1 or ANTA01H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT200H5 • Introduction to the Practice of Archaeology

Archaeological theory, method and technique. Principles of scientific research will be applied to archaeological information. The course will cover the following topics: how archaeology applies the scientific method; how archaeological projects are planned and organized; how archaeological data are recovered through survey, excavation and other means; how archaeological data are organized and analyzed to produce information about the human past; the major theoretical paradigms that archaeologists use to interpret the human past.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5
Exclusions: ANT200Y5 or ANT200Y1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT201H5 • World Archaeology

Archaeological survey of human cultural development from a global perspective, including: the elaboration of material culture; the expansion of social inequality; the development of diverse food procurement (hunter-gatherer-fisher) and food production (herding-agricultural) economies; and the changes in patterns of mobility over time and between world areas, with the growth of village and city life. Students will engage with the current state of archaeological research and some of the major issues archaeologists address in their recreations of archaeologically-based human history.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5
Exclusions: ANT200Y5 or ANT200Y1
Recommended Preparation: ANT102H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT202H5 • Biological Anthropology: Human Variation and Adaptation

Biological anthropology deals with the diversity and evolution of human beings and their living and fossil relatives, and how they have adapted to their environments. This course will introduce students to basic concepts of human genetics and Mendelian inheritance. The course will also describe the biological and evolutionary factors that have produced the fascinating diversity observed in human populations, and illustrate different ways in which humans have adapted to their environments.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5 or BIO152H5
Exclusions: ANT203Y5 or ANT203Y1 or ANTB15H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT203H5 • Biological Anthropology: Primatology and Palaeoanthropology

Biological anthropology deals with the diversity and evolution of human beings and their living and fossil relatives, and how they have adapted to their environments. This course will introduce students to the remarkable biological diversity of our taxonomic order: the primates. The course will also discuss the rich fossil evidence for human evolution and its interpretation.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5 or BIO153H5
Exclusions: ANT203Y5 or ANT203Y1 or ANTB14H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT205H5 • Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

Introduction to the field of forensic anthropology. Outlines the areas in which forensic anthropologists may contribute to a death investigation and introduces basic concepts relating to the recovery and analysis of human remains.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5 or BIO152H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT210H5 • Fantasies, Hoaxes and Misrepresentations of the Ancient World

Have you ever wondered why television programs like Ancient Aliens are so popular or if they have any merit? Have you also wondered why outrageous ideas about the human past seem to be more popular than the message science presents? This course critically evaluates the anatomy of significant hoaxes, outrageous claims, and just plain old "bad archaeology" in popular culture. Students will develop the tools to critically evaluate potential hoaxes and fictional accounts of the past by investigating a wide variety of cases that range from attempts to rewrite history using fake discoveries, to the simply outrageous claims created in order to promote racist agendas, to make money, or just for the fun of duping an unsuspecting public.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT211H5 • Sex, Evolution and Behaviour

This course provides an introduction to the evolutionary significance of mating behaviours and sexual reproduction in modern humans. Students will explore human sexual behaviour with an emphasis on the evolutionary explanations for our mating strategies in relation to other primates. Through lectures, films and readings students will examine such topics as sexual selection, anatomy, sexual development, social organization, and mating patterns.

Exclusions: ANT331H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT214H5 • Anthropology of Food and Nutrition

This course explores human food use and nutrition from a broad anthropological perspective. It examines archaeological evidence of dietary patterns of human ancestors and examines contemporary phenomena such as the preference for sweetness and lactase persistence that are the legacy of ancestral adaptations. It explores significant food revolutions, from the origins of agriculture to the relatively recent phenomenon of biotechnological food production and looks at both the positive and negative effects of these changes on patterns of human growth and health. The goal of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of nutrition science that is contextualized in contemporary anthropological debates about the costs of changing food systems.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT218H5 • The Social Conquest of Earth

This course is a quest for the secret of human uniqueness. The success of Homo sapiens, has been described as "a spectacular evolutionary anomaly" that has resulted in human domination of the Earth's biosphere. We will use the comparative method to journey through the Animal Kingdom in hopes of discovering the preadaptive elements that enabled such incredible evolutionary success. On our way we will survey chimpanzee warfare, tool using octopuses, eusocial ants, and night-time hunter-gatherer sentinels - all of which will allow us to better understand the forces that shaped unparalleled cooperative networks in humans. Finally, we will investigate the cognitive and behavioural blessings and curses associated with the drive to belong to a group. The goal of the course is to equip students with a greater understanding of the human condition - and how to leverage this understanding to improve their lives.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT220H5 • Introduction to the Anthropology of Health

This course introduces students to the many strategies anthropologists use to understand patterns of health and disease in human populations through time. It will serve as an entry point into the Anthropology of Health focus and will be a prerequisite for later courses in Growth and Development, Infectious Disease, and the Advanced Seminar in the Anthropology of Health. In this course, the concept of health is examined using bioarchaeology, biomedicine, medical anthropology, and epidemiology. The course examines evolutionary, epigenetic, and life history approaches to understanding chronic disease risk in human populations, culminating in an investigation of the role of poverty and social inequality on disease burden. Although the course is designed as an introduction to the Health focus, it is suitable for students seeking training in pre-health disciplines and is open to all students possessing the necessary prerequisites.

Prerequisites: ANT101H5 and ANT102H5
Exclusions: ANT208H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT221H5 • The Trust Paradox

The ultimate question that all life is bound to ask is: how do I survive? Our species, evolved a uniquely human answer, which led to our ascendance as the most dominant on the planet but at what cost? This course explores a central human paradox: how altruism, community, kindness, and war and genocide are all driven by the same core adaptation. We'll call this the Trust Paradox and the evolution of this suite of traits, best described as coalitionary cognition, is one of the most complex and ancient in our species. We will explore how this, often imperceptible drive, is responsible for our capacity for both cooperation and competition, and allowed us to navigate increasingly complex social landscapes. But in our vast modern world, has this blessing become a curse?


Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: Online

ANT300H5 • Cultural Heritage Management: The Past in the Present and for the Future

Cultural Heritage Management, also known as cultural resource management or applied archaeology, aims to protect traces of the past such as artifacts, archaeological sites and cultural landscapes, that have meaning for people in the present. This course takes a broad look at cultural heritage, why it matters in the present, and why we need to preserve aspects of it for the future. Topics may include stakeholders and the politics of the past, mechanisms for the protection of heritage and archaeological sites, the heritage management industry, and the methods used to identify, document, and mitigate impacts to archaeological sites, and to preserve the materials recovered.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT306H5 • Forensic Anthropology Field School

Introduction to the field of forensic anthropological field techniques and scene interpretation. A 2-week field school will be held on the U of T Mississauga campus (Monday to Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., two weeks in August). Weekly 2-hour classes will be held during the fall term. In these classes, students will examine casts, maps, photos and other evidence collected in the field, for the purposes of scene reconstruction and presentation in court. Limited Enrolment and Application Process: see Anthropology department website for more details.

Prerequisites: ANT205H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 104P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT312H5 • Archaeological Analysis

This course will introduce the process of archaeological research, from project design through report write-up. The student will create a project proposal, choose methods of survey and excavation, describe and organize data for analysis, and summarize findings in a project report.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5
Exclusions: ARH312Y1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT313H5 • China, Korea and Japan in Prehistory

The exploration of the remarkable prehistories of China, the Koreas and Japan challenge western thought on agricultural origins, complex hunter-gatherers, urbanization and the development of centralized authority. This course evaluates current thinking about these issues in the three regions and examines the impact of local archaeological practice on the construction of narratives about the past.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT314H5 • History of Archaeological Theory

This course examines major schools of archaeological thought over time. We will explore how theoretical approaches to archeological explanations of the human past affect and are affected by how archaeologists investigate research questions and interpret archaeological evidence. Readings include historically important key works as well as recent syntheses.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT317H5 • Archaeology of Indigenous Eastern North America

This course is a survey from an archaeological perspective of Indigenous history in Ontario and the Eastern Woodlands of North America from earliest times until colonization. Themes examined will include technology, subsistence, shelter, landscape use, art, and trade and how these vary in time and space.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5
Exclusions: ANT317H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT318H5 • Archaeological Fieldwork

Introduction to archaeological field methods. Practical component of the field school takes place on the UTM campus during the last two weeks of August (Monday-Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm). Morning lectures (week one) covering note taking, map making, cultural landscapes, material culture identification and survey and excavation methods, are followed by afternoons in the field applying skills taught that morning. Week two is spent excavating at an archaeological site. During weekly laboratory sessions September – December students learn to process, identify, and catalogue artifacts recovered during the field component. Limited Enrolment and Application Process: see Anthropology department website for more details.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 27L/101P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT320H5 • Archaeological Approaches to Technology

Using hands-on learning as a primary approach, this course focuses on insights into social and cultural processes provided by the study of ancient and historic technology. Experimental, ethnographic, archaeological, and textual data are used to examine topics such as organization and control of production, style of technology, and the value of objects. Throughout, we will discuss social and cultural as well as economic and functional reasons for the development and adoption of new technologies.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5
Recommended Preparation: ANT204H5 or ANT207H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT327H5 • Agricultural Origins: The Second Revolution

A second revolution in human existence began when people developed agriculture long after the origin of modern humans and Upper Palaeolithic culture. This course critically evaluates the shift to agriculture in the context of current ecological and archaeological perspectives. The concept of "agriculture" is evaluated by considering plant and animal domestication as well as resource management in a broad range of contexts.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT331H5 • The Biology of Human Sexuality

Human sexual behaviours will be examined through the lens of evolutionary theory. Through lectures and readings, students will examine such topics as genetic, hormonal, and environmental determinants of sex, sexual selection, and the influence of sex on life history and behaviour. Students will discuss research that has been published in this area, and will develop critical assessments of the literature and films.

Prerequisites: ANT202H5 or ANT203H5 or ANT211H5
Exclusions: ANT330H5 and ANT331Y5
Recommended Preparation: ANT211H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT332H5 • Human Origins I: Early Ancestors to Homo

What does it mean to be human? Paleoanthropologists address this question by using fossil evidence to piece together our evolutionary history. Who we are today is a product of our biological and geological past. We will begin this quest by looking at ourselves as primates, and then we will traverse back through time to study primate origins, evolution, adaptations, and behaviour until we reach our genus, Homo.

Prerequisites: ANT202H5 and ANT203H5
Exclusions: ANT332Y5 or ANT335Y1 or ANTC16H3 or ANTC17H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT333H5 • Human Origins II: The genus Homo

What does it mean to be human? This course will examine the evolutionary journey through the genus Homo by examining the fossil evidence and the archeological record. Through this examination we will discover the unique biological and behavioural characteristics of modern humans.

Prerequisites: ANT332H5
Exclusions: ANT332Y5 or ANT335Y1 or ANTC16H3 or ANTC17H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT334H5 • Human Osteology

In this course students are given hands-on experience in the identification of the normal anatomy of the adult human skeleton with accompanying muscle function. Metrical variation, growth and development, bone histology, and methods of individual identification are introduced.

Prerequisites: ANT202H5 and ANT203H5
Exclusions: ANT334Y5 or ANT334H1 or ANT334Y1 or ANTC47H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT337H5 • Anthropology of Growth and Development

This course examines the fundamental biological principles of growth and how these are expressed throughout evolution. It explores the evolution of growth patterns among primates and hominins and compares patterns of growth among the living primates. The course examines human growth and development throughout infancy, childhood, and adolescence and explores the influence of genetic, epigenetic, and endocrine processes on the plasticity of human growth that ultimately produces the variability observed in our species. The goal of the course is to provide students with a complex understanding of how evolutionary and environmental processes interact in the production of growth and health in human populations.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or ANT203H5) and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT338H5 • Laboratory Methods in Biological Anthropology

This lab methods course focuses on laboratory techniques used by biological anthropologists to assess growth, health, and risk of chronic disease in human populations. In this course students will gain practical, hands-on experience in nutrition assessment, anthropometry, physical activity and sleep assessment, and human energy expenditure. State-of-the-art instruments and software are employed, ensuring students gain valuable knowledge of data management and analysis using applications suitable in both clinical and research settings.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or ANT203H5) and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT340H5 • Osteological Theory and Methods

This course instructs students in the osteological methods used to interpret the life course of past populations, and the theory underlying these analyses. We will explore how skeletal analyses are employed to interpret group identity and behaviour using a biocultural approach and will address ethical issues pertaining to human remains, including the goals of descendant populations. The theoretical underpinnings of osteobiographical analyses, biological distance studies, paleopathology, and paleodemography will be outlined. Students will observe human morphological skeletal variation as a result of taphonomic processes, sex, age, pathological conditions, and non-metric variance.

Prerequisites: ANT334H5
Exclusions: ANT334Y5 or ANTC48H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT341H5 • Anthropology of Infectious Disease

Infection is situated at the intersection of social and biological experience. This course examines why infectious disease occupies such a central position in our contemporary understanding of health. It examines the many theoretical and methodological approaches currently used to understand how humans experience infectious illness. Perspectives from bioarchaeology, demography, environmental anthropology, medical history, biocultural anthropology, and medical anthropology are used to examine the way epidemics and infections have been understood throughout human history and how those understandings continue to shape human perceptions of risk, the body and identity. Social inequality is a major focus of inquiry; the course explores how colonialism, globalization and injustice lead to significant and persistent health inequalities for many populations.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or ANT204H5) and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT367H5 • Sister Species: Lessons from the chimpanzee

Chimpanzees are our closest living relatives. In this course we will examine chimpanzee behavior, ecology, morphology, physiology, language, intelligence, and genetics. Through lectures, labs, films and writing assignments we will get an intimate look at every aspect of chimpanzee biology and behavior. Among questions asked will be: Why do animals use or not use tools? Why are animals aggressive? How does physiology influence what chimpanzees can eat and what's healthy to eat? Can chimpanzees use language? Do chimpanzees use medicine? Just how different are chimpanzee bones, muscles, and brains from our own? Throughout the class we will turn to use chimpanzees as a model to better understand ourselves and our place in nature.

Prerequisites: ANT202H5 and ANT203H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT380H5 • Special Topics in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Special course on selected topics in biological anthropology and/or archaeology; focus of topic changes each year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200-level prerequisite core course requirement(s) will be posted on the departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT397H5 • Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading and initial research planning on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT397Y5 • Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading and initial research planning on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT398H5 • Independent Reading

This independent reading course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT398Y5 • Independent Reading

This independent reading course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT402H5 • Wild Nights: Sleep, evolution, and performance in the 21st century

Sleep is essential to cognitive function and health in humans, yet the ultimate reasons for sleep - that is, 'why' we sleep - remains mysterious. This course integrates research findings from human sleep studies, the ethnographic record, and the ecology and evolution of mammalian and primate sleep to better understand sleep along the human lineage and in the modern world. Students will learn how to use 'wearable' technology, such as actigraphy, for scientific research. The goal of the course is to empower students with the theoretical and technological tools to be able to not only critically assess their own sleep-wake behaviour and performance but also popular generalizations about how to maximize long-term health outcomes.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or ANT203H5 or ANT220H5) and 2.0 credits in 300-400 level Anthropology or Psychology or Biology courses
Recommended Preparation: Priority may be given to students who are considering a Master's thesis in anthropology, psychology, or biology. Basic statistics.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

ANT403H5 • Social Learning and Cultural Patterns

Social learning is fundamental to human experience, through which individuals, societies, and generations share information and practices, and form cultural patterns and norms. Learning how to do something is also learning how to be a member of a society. Understanding social learning enables us to make the connections between the population-level, intergenerational cultural phenomena and the measurable individual-level process. This course uses case studies from anthropology, psychology, and biology to discuss the social, psychological, and biological foundations of social learning and the roles of social learning in enabling the accumulation of knowledge in human societies and shaping cultural patterns.

Prerequisites: At least 1.5 credits from (ANT200H5 or ANT201H5 or ANT202H5 or ANT204H5 or ANT206H5 or ANT218H5) and 2.0 credits at the 300-400 level in Anthropology or Psychology or Biology courses

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT404H5 • Current Topics in Palaeoanthropology

This course will introduce students to cutting-edge developments in the palaeoanthropological field. The weekly seminars will be strongly research-based, incorporating the latest discoveries, publications and debates. This course will also involve an in-class practical component during which the extensive cast collection in the department will be utilized, together with new 3D methods for fossil visualization. The goal of this course is to: 1) reinforce key theoretical concepts traditionally applied in the field, and 2) provide students with knowledge of the more recent debates and methodological approaches currently pushing the boundaries of palaeoanthropology.

Prerequisites: ANT202H5 and ANT203H5 and 1.0 credits in 300-level anthropology courses and departmental approval.
Recommended Preparation: ANT332H5 and ANT333H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12P/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT405H5 • Behind Bars: Anthropology of Institutions and Confinement

This course explores confinement, institutions, and incarceration from a broad anthropological perspective. Bioarchaeological, archaeological, and ethnographic research on institutions (e.g., asylums, poorhouses, prisons) will be critically examined. The goal of the course is to provide students with a complex understanding of institutionalization through time and how health vulnerabilities are created and recreated.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT407H5 • Quantitative Methods in Archaeology and Biological Anthropology

This course will provide students with the basic analytic background necessary to evaluate quantitative data in biological anthropology and archaeology. Students will be introduced to foundational statistical concepts and research methods suitable for anthropological exploration. The focus will be on analysing univariate and bivariate data using both nonparametric and parametric statistical techniques, hypothesis testing, and methods of data collection. The goal of this course is for students to learn how to manipulate simple datasets, ask and answer theoretically relevant questions, and choose the appropriate statistical test for a given research problem. Students will receive hands-on training during lab components and will learn how to analyse data using relevant statistical software. Students will have access to a number of biological anthropology and archaeology datasets for class assignments. No prior knowledge of statistics and mathematics is required.

Prerequisites: (ANT200H5 and ANT201H5) or (ANT202H5 and ANT203H5)
Exclusions: ANTC35H3 and BIO360H5 and BIO361H5 and ECO220Y5 and ECO227Y5 and PSY201H5 and PSY202H5 and SOC300Y5 and (SOC350H5 and SOC351H5) and STA218H5 and STA220H5 and STA221H5 and STA256H5 and STA258H5 and STA260H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT414H5 • People and Plants in Prehistory

The relationship between plants and people through time offers important insights into our past, particularly human-environmental interaction, plant domestication, and agricultural origins and development. Students will learn archaeological plant remains identification and interpretation skills through a combination of laboratory and seminar sessions. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process. Skills learned in this course are also useful in forensic investigations. Students will develop a project based on archaeological material from Japan and/or Ontario in consultation with the instructor.

Prerequisites: ANT200H5 and ANT201H5 and 0.5 credit at a 300-level archaeology course, or permission of department

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT415H5 • Faunal Archaeo-Osteology

Examination and interpretation of faunal material from archaeological sites, to obtain cultural information regarding the site occupants.

Prerequisites: (ANT200H5 and ANT201H5) and (ANT306H5 or ANT308H5 or ANT312H5 or ANT318H5)
Exclusions: ANT415Y5 and ANT415Y1
Recommended Preparation: ANT312H5 or (ANT334H5 and ANT340H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT416H5 • Advanced Archaeological Analysis

This course will involve students in applied laboratory methods in archaeology. Each student will engage in an individual research project on an archaeological data set. Techniques will include basic description, measurement, quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis. The primary focus will be ceramic and lithic analysis.

Prerequisites: ANT312H5
Exclusions: ANT312Y1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT418H5 • Advanced Archaeological Fieldwork

Practical experience for students who completed ANT318H5 and are ready for more advanced field experiences. During practical component (last two weeks of August, Monday-Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm) students have responsibility for recording/documenting an archaeological site in the field, including survey and detailed mapping. Students also act as mentors to ANT318 students during pedestrian and subsurface survey, and excavation. During weekly laboratory sessions September – December students process, identify, and catalogue artifacts, and learn to write an archaeological report and site record form. Limited Enrolment and Application Process: see Anthropology department website for more details.

Prerequisites: ANT318H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 27L/101P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT430H5 • Special Problems in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Special seminar on selected topics in biological anthropology and/or archaeology; focus of seminar changes each year.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200-level and/or 300-level prerequisite core course requirement(s) will be posted on the departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT432H5 • Advanced Seminar in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

Special seminar on selected topics in any scientific aspect of anthropology, including one or more sub-fields; focus of seminar changes each year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200-level and/or 300-level prerequisite core course requirement(s) will be posted on the departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT434H5 • Palaeopathology

The study of diseases and maladies of ancient populations. The course will survey the range of pathology on human skeletons, (trauma, infection, syphilis, tuberculosis, leprosy, anemia, metabolic disturbances, arthritis and tumors).

Prerequisites: ANT334H5
Corequisites: ANT340H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT436H5 • Theory and Methods in Molecular Anthropology

Survey of theory and methods in molecular anthropology, a subdiscipline of anthropology that attempts to understand human evolution and the variation observed in our species using molecular information.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 and ANT203H5) and 1.0 credits in 300 level Anthropology courses
Exclusions: ANT336H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT437H5 • Advanced Seminar in the Anthropology of Health

This course is the culmination of the undergraduate Anthropology of Health focus and aims to prepare students for workplace application and graduate study in a wide range of clinical and research domains. The course brings together diverse branches of biological investigation (human biology, nutrition, growth and development, chronic and communicable disease) and undertakes a critical examination of theory and methods used in the study of human health. It traces the historical development of the powerful biomedical paradigm that dominates health research today and uses a critical lens to examine the systems used to measure and classify health and disease. It explores evolutionary and biological approaches to understanding human health by examining the concepts of adaptation and plasticity, genetic and epigenetic approaches, developmental origins and life history theories, social determinants of health, and critical medical anthropology. The course explores the profoundly influential role of social inequality on the production and reproduction of health in historical and contemporary populations.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or ANT204H5) and ANT220H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT438H5 • The Development of Thought in Biological Anthropology

This course will present a world-wide perspective of biological anthropological research and how it developed in different countries. To be discussed will be variation in approaches, subjects studied, philosophical attitudes, and the emergence of common themes in the study of physical anthropology.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 and ANT203H5) and 1.0 credit in300 level Biological Anthropology course

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT439H5 • Advanced Forensic Anthropology

Forensic anthropologists are responsible for the search, recovery, and analysis of human skeletal remains in modern contexts. This course will explore the knowledge and skills used by forensic anthropologists to reconstruct the biological profile of the deceased, make an identification, contribute to the determination of manner and mode of death, understand the events that took place at the scene, and to provide an estimate of time since death.

Prerequisites: ANT205H5 and ANT334H5
Corequisites: ANT340H5
Recommended Preparation: ANT306H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT441H5 • Advanced Bioarchaeology

This course provides students with problem-based, experiential learning in bioarchaeology, including methods of analysis, theoretical issues, and the excavation, documentation and interpretation of a burial. Labs will address analyses and approaches used in CRM when consulting for Indigenous groups and contract archaeologists. Students will collaborate to excavate, analyze, and interpret data, generating a bioarchaeological report of the excavated cemetery.

Prerequisites: ANT340H5
Exclusions: ANTD35H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT497H5 • Advanced Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading, research and planning for a publishable report on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the research and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT497Y5 • Advanced Independent Study

This independent study course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading, research and planning for a publishable report on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the research and study program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT498H5 • Advanced Independent Reading

This independent reading course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ANT498Y5 • Advanced Independent Reading

This independent reading course is designed to offer students advanced supervised reading on an anthropological topic not covered in other courses, or covered only briefly. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the reading program.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Permission of Department

Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST101H5 • Exploring the Solar System

This course explores Earth's local family, consisting of two types of major planets, newly identified dwarf planets, many moons orbiting the planets, and millions of smaller objects such as comets and meteoroids. This course examines how these groups are similar and different, how the solar system formed, and how our solar system compares to the systems of other stars.

Exclusions: AST101H1 or AST121H1 or AST221H1 or ASTA01H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST110H5 • Introduction to Astronomical Observations

This course gives a quantitative, scientific introduction to observing, concentrating on objects that can be seen with the naked eye or with binoculars. The measurements will be combined with calculations to yield quantitative conclusions and predictions. This is the first course for students following the major in astronomy or the specialist in astronomical sciences, but it is also suitable for students with the appropriate background who want to understand more fully the celestial phenomena visible to them.

Recommended Preparation: SPH4U and MHF4U and MCV4U

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST115H5 • Cultural Astronomy

This course will explore the historic and ongoing relationship between astronomy and human culture. In this course, students will approach astronomical concepts through the lens of archaeoastronomy – the exploration of astronomical practices in ancient cultures, and ethnoastronomy – the study of modern astronomical practices by cultures around the world. Topics will include cultural interpretations of the motions of the stars, planets, moon, and sun, methods of navigation and timekeeping, puzzles that have inspired important shifts in our understanding of the Universe, and varying cultural conceptions of what science is and how it is done.

Exclusions: AST101H5 or AST101H1 or AST215H5 or AST210H1 or ASTB03H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST201H5 • Exploring the Universe

The Universe extends from the Sun to the most distant regions we can observe. This course explores our Sun, the other stars, the Milky Way galaxy in which our Sun lives, other galaxies that are far outside our Milky Way, and the most distant objects we can observe. In addition, the course presents evidence that everything we observe is just a small fraction of what exists in the Universe. The course content considers how the Universe began and evolved over time and the possibility of life beyond Earth.

Exclusions: AST121H1 or AST201H1 or AST210H1 or AST221H1 or AST222H1 or ASTA02H3 or ASTB23H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST221H5 • Astrophysics I – Planets, Sun and Stars

This course explores the astrophysics of planets, Sun and stars, including their observed variety, structure, formation and evolution.

Prerequisites: [MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5] and (PHY146H5 and PHY147H5)



Exclusions: AST221H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST222H5 • Astrophysics II – Stellar Systems, Galaxies and the Universe

This course explores the astrophysics of the Milky Way, other galaxies, and the Universe.

Prerequisites: AST221H5
Exclusions: AST222H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST252H5 • Life in the Universe

This course addresses the question of life beyond Earth. Starting with our current understanding of how life began and evolved on Earth, the course explores possibility that life might have developed elsewhere in the Universe. It summarizes the evidence that the conditions necessary for life might exist today or existed in the past on other planets in our solar system. This search for evidence of life is then extended to the thousands of planets that have been discovered orbiting other stars.

Exclusions: AST251H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST320H5 • Astrophysics III – Unsolved Problems in Astrophysics

This course explores the formation, equilibrium, and evolution of structure on various astronomical scales through the investigation of major open questions in modern astrophysics. Topics may include exoplanet formation and evolution, supermassive black holes, the progenitors of type Ia supernovae, galaxy evolution, and the nature of dark matter.

Prerequisites: AST222H5
Exclusions: AST320H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

AST399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides third-year undergraduate students (after completing at least 9.0 credits) who have developed some knowledge of astronomical research with an opportunity to assist in a research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled in this course have the opportunity to enhance their research skills and share in the excitement of acquiring new knowledge and in the discovery process of science. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February, and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO152H5 • Introduction to Evolution and Evolutionary Genetics

The scientific method and the modern theory of evolution as an introduction to biology. The principles of evolution, transmission and evolutionary genetics are developed in lectures and laboratories.

Note:
Although 12U CHM and MAT are not prerequisites for BIO152H5, students intending to pursue a major or any specialist program in Biology must note that CHM110H5 and CHM120H5 and (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5) are requirements for these programs.

Prerequisites: Grade 12 SBI4U Biology (minimum grade of 70%)
Exclusions: BIO130H1 or BIOA01H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO153H5 • Diversity of Organisms

The consequences of Darwinian evolution: adaptations of organisms as a product of the main evolutionary mechanism - natural selection. The roles of natural selection and other mechanisms in the diversification of life are reviewed, along with the diversity of structures and life cycles in bacteria, protists, animals, plants and fungi.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5
Exclusions: BIO120H1 or BIOA02H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO200H5 • Introduction to Pharmacology: Pharmacokinetic Principles

Topics include absorption, distribution, biotransformation, elimination, calculation of dosages, variability in drug response and adverse drug reactions.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and CHM110H5 and CHM120H5
Exclusions: PCL201H1 or JBC201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO201H5 • The Biology Behind the News

News stories are used to explore areas of biology, to learn about the process of science, and to find and assess the validity of information. The topics for the course modules will change yearly because the course is designed to give students the tools to explore the biology behind the news, not to teach a comprehensive survey of biological facts. Reading, writing, and research skills are emphasized. This is a biology course for students in the Humanities and Social Sciences as well as other non-Biology Sciences.

Exclusions: Any BIO course (except BIO211H5) taken previously or concurrently.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO202H5 • Introductory Animal Physiology

Diversity of structure and function in animals at the tissue and organ system level. Focus is on morphology and processes that sustain life and maintain homeostasis, including water balance, gas exchange, acquisition and transport of oxygen and nutrients, temperature regulation, electrical and chemical signal transmission, sensory processing, and locomotion. Principles and mechanisms of animal form and function are developed in lectures and laboratories.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and CHM110H5 and CHM120H5
Exclusions: BIO204H5 or (BIO270H1 or BIO271H1) or (BIOB32H3 or BIOB34H3)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/10T/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO203H5 • Introductory Plant Morphology and Physiology

Introduction to the morphology and physiology of plants. Students will learn that plants require energy to support metabolism and growth, and that these processes are highly regulated in order to achieve homeostasis. Topics covered include: biology of the plant cell, plant morphology, plant respiration and photosynthesis, transport processes, regulation of growth and development, and plant ecophysiology. Principles and mechanisms of plant form and function are developed in lectures and laboratories.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and CHM110H5 and CHM120H5
Exclusions: BIO204H5 or BIO251H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/10T/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO205H5 • Ecology

An introduction to the scientific study of ecology, emphasizing the structure and dynamics of populations, communities and ecosystems. Topics include population growth and regulation, competition, predation, biodiversity, succession, and nutrient cycling. Classic models and studies will be supplemented with both plant and animal examples.

Prerequisites: (BIO152H5 and BIO153H5) or (ENV100Y5 for students in Environmental Programs)
Exclusions: BIOB50H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO206H5 • Introductory Cell and Molecular Biology

An introduction to the molecular biology of the cell with an emphasis on similarities and differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Topics include the structure and function of: macromolecules, membranes, ribosomes, nuclei, intracellular organelles, etc. Other topics include: the central dogma of molecular biology (replication, transcription and translation), protein targeting, organization of the genome, gene regulation and regulation of the cell cycle. Tutorials will emphasize and consolidate concepts from lecture and text through individual and group assignments.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and CHM110H5 and CHM120H5
Exclusions: BIO230H1 or BIO255H1 or BIOB10Y3 or BIOB11H3 or BIOB12H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/6T/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO207H5 • Introductory Genetics

The principles of Mendelian inheritance and modern genetics are illustrated using examples from medical research, evolutionary biology, agriculture and conservation biology. Topics covered include: chromosome theory of inheritance, basic eukaryotic chromosome mapping, gene and chromosome mutation, the lac system, the extranuclear genome, population and quantitative genetics. In tutorials, students will work through problem sets related to lecture material as well as probability and statistical analysis.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and BIO206H5
Exclusions: BIO260H1 or HMB265H1 or BIOC15H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/18T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO208H5 • Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology I

The integration of the major organ systems involved in human biomechanics. A comparative approach is taken, placing the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems in an evolutionary context.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Exclusions: BIO210H5 or BIO210Y5Y or BIOB33H3 or BIOB35H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO209H5 • Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology II

The structure and function of the human body. Topics include integrating different organ systems, such as endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urogenital systems. An emphasis is placed on integration of structure and function of the major organ systems. As part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process.

Prerequisites: BIO208H5
Exclusions: BIO210H5 or BIO210Y5Y or BIOB33H3 or BIOB35H5

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO211H5 • The History of Our Living Planet

This course provides a survey of major events in the evolution of life and Earth's geological history. It includes overviews of science as a process, geological principles, climate, and evolution. Special focus will be on major events including origin of life, the Cambrian explosion, plant and animal radiations onto land, the Mesozoic evolution of dinosaurs, and the Cenozoic diversification of mammals. This is a biology course for students in the Humanities and Social Sciences as well as other non-Biology Sciences.

Exclusions: Any BIO course (except BIO201H5) taken previously or concurrently.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO259H5 • Introduction to Biological Data

This course introduces students to the exploration and analysis of biological data through computation. Students will learn to import biological datasets, parse and manipulate the data, and develop an intuition for basic statistical thinking through practical exercises and lectures.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Exclusions: BIOB20H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This program provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO304H5 • Physiology of Neurons and Muscle

The course will provide students with knowledge of the physiology of neurons, muscle and sensory systems by demonstrating the biophysical, ionic, and molecular bases of cellular excitability. Topics include the forces that govern ion movement through solution, the electrical properties of the cell membrane, the molecular properties of ion channels, and the molecular physiology of neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission, neuromodulation, and muscle contraction.

Prerequisites: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5 or BIO206H5 or (BIO208H5 and BIO209H5) or BIO210Y5
Exclusions: CJH332H1 or CSB332H1
Recommended Preparation: PHY100H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO310H5 • Physiology of Regulatory Systems

Principles of cardiovascular, renal, respiratory and digestive physiology of animals and their control by the neural and endocrine systems.

Prerequisites: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5 or (BIO208H5 and BIO209H5) or BIO210Y5
Exclusions: PSL300H1 and PSL301H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO311H5 • Landscape Ecology

Landscape ecology asks how spatial patterns originate and how they affect ecological processes like forest dynamics, nutrient cycling, species interactions, and the distribution and population dynamics of plants and animals. Lectures and computer labs introduce students to concepts and methods of landscape ecology and their application to current issues of land-use management and global change. The students will learn to apply GIS, spatial statistics, landscape metrics, and modelling to address problems in conservation, biodiversity, and ecosystem management. Note: Students interested in this course will need to meet with the course instructor before being approved and permitted to enroll.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and (BIO259H5 or STA215H5) and permission of instructor *STA215H5 will no longer be accepted as an appropriate prerequisite course AFTER 2022-2023 Academic year. Beginning 2023-2024 Academic year all students will be required to complete BIO259H5 as the statistics prerequisite course.
Exclusions: GGR311H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO360H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO312H5 • Plant Physiology

This course focuses on the principal physiological processes in plants and the regulation of these processes in response to environmental factors with an emphasis on the relationship between structure and function from the molecular to the whole-plant level. The course will provide the basis to understand how plants sense and respond to changing environmental conditions. This will enable students to understand why rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and global climate warming impact photosynthesis, plant metabolism and ultimately whole plant and ecosystem performance. Concepts discussed during lectures will be demonstrated in a series of practical labs.

Prerequisites: BIO203H5 or BIO204H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO313H5 • Methods and Experimental Design in Ecology

This course will provide Biology Majors and Specialists particularly interested in ecology with integrated, practical exposure to field and laboratory research methods on plant, animal, and microbial communities including study design, data collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 or BIO259H5 or STA215H5 or PSY201H5 or equivalent.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO314H5 • Laboratory in Cell and Molecular Biology

Students are introduced to commonly employed techniques in cell biology such as cellular fractionation, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blotting, and immunolocalization. Students will also perform some advanced molecular biology techniques including the cloning and transformation of genes, DNA sequencing and the expression of proteins in bacterial and/or model systems. Each week, a two-hour lecture provides an introduction and theoretical basis for the lab.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO315H5 • Human Cell Biology

This course uses the information learned in prerequisite courses to cover advanced details in specific areas. The course will also introduce students to many exciting new topics in the structure and function of normal and diseased cells. Areas of focus include cell adhesion, intercellular communication, signal transduction, the cytoskeleton, chemotaxis, motor proteins, receptor mediated endocytosis and intracellular trafficking with an eye towards understanding their underlying roles in the disease process. Throughout the course, students will learn about the underlying approaches, methods and experimentation used by biomedical researchers including polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blotting, immunolocalization, pharmacological intervention and various means of localizing proteins within cells.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO318Y5 • Animal Behaviour

This course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals behave in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success in survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental, and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses) for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published scientific paper.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Exclusions: BIO328H5 or PSY252H5 or PSY352H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L/72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO320H5 • Sensory and Cognitive Ecology

The acquisition and transduction of environmental information will be explored in the context of decision making and adaptive behaviour. This course will focus on the form and function of visual, auditory, tactile, and chemical senses and signals, and animal communication writ large. Post-acquisition, cognitive processes concerned with learning and memory will also be discussed. A comparative approach will be taken throughout to examine the ways that different animals and animal groups rely on different sources of information and a diverse variety of sensory and cognitive mechanisms. All topics will be covered in the context of species-specific ecology and evolution.

Prerequisites: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5
Exclusions: PSY362H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/10T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO324H5 • Plant Biochemistry

This course examines plants as the biochemical motors and sustainers of life on earth. The major pathways of plant metabolism are surveyed to provide students with an integrated model of plant cells as autonomous biochemical networks. This course further emphasizes the specialized metabolism of economically significant plant species, the biosynthesis of pharmacologically and agriculturally important metabolites, and the role of biotechnology in engineering exotic plant metabolism in industrial settings.

Prerequisites: BIO203H5 and BIO206H5 and CHM120H5 or permission of instructor
Exclusions: CSB475H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO312H5 and CHM242H5 and CHM362H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO325H5 • Biomechanics

From the form of an organism one can read its evolutionary history. This course addresses the use of organ systems to find and process food, escape enemies by locomotion, reproduce by pollination vectors, filter nutrients, exchange gases, coordinate and make decisions. Content includes the mechanics of moving in fluids by swimming and flying, sending and receiving of signals at body surfaces, the microstructure of materials. Forces are seen to have adaptively affected the shape and leverage of skeletons.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO326H5 • Ornithology

Ecology, evolution, form, function, diversity, and conservation of birds. Practical sessions focus on observation and assessment of local avian populations using field ornithology techniques and approaches.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and BIO205H5
Exclusions: EEB386H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO202H5

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO328H5 • Lectures in Animal Behaviour

This course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals behave in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success in survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental, and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses) for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published scientific paper. No laboratory or field work is included. Note: This is a half-credit (0.5) course that is offered over the full academic year.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Exclusions: BIO318Y5 or PSY252H5 or PSY352H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO329H5 • Conservation Biology

Conservation of biodiversity, from genes to ecosystems. Topics include identifying biodiversity across levels of organization; understanding major threats to biodiversity (land use change, climate change, overharvesting); evaluating conservation actions (protected areas, reintroductions, assisted migration, restoration); and ethical considerations pertaining to conservation practices.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and BIO259H5
Exclusions: BIOC63H3 or EEB215H1 or EEB255H1 or EEB365H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO330H5 • Plant Ecology

A survey of the population and community ecology of plants. Topics include resource acquisition, growth and reproduction, mutualisms, competition, defence, invasions, disturbance, population dynamics, and community structure. Interactions with other plants, diseases, and animals particularly are emphasized.

Prerequisites: (BIO203H5 or BIO204H5) and BIO205H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO331H5 • Ecology of Communities

This course will cover the theoretical foundations of community ecology, including the role of species interactions and environment structure on patterns of diversity and implications of community ecology in conservation. It will provide practical experience working with tools used to analyze community structure. Discussion and evaluation of the primary literature is a key component of this course. Students will also complete written assignments.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and (BIO259H5 or BIO360H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO332H5 • Biology Field Research

A two-week Biology field research experience offered in one of the summer terms. The location, subject of the research, and instructor will change according to a regular cycle. Details will be made available on the Department of Biology website well in advance of a change to location. Please note that this course can only be completed once. There will be additional costs for travel and accommodation.

Prerequisites: 6.0 credits and current registration in a Biology, Ecology, Environment/Geography or Earth Science program and permission of the instructor. Appropriate upper level BIO prerequisite core course requirements will be posted on the Biology department website. Any additional unique prerequisites for the course will be posted one year in advance of the move to a new location or with a change of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: STA215H5 or equivalent 200-level STA course

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/80P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO333H5 • Freshwater Ecology

A functional analysis of freshwater ecosystems, with emphasis on lakes. Lectures cover water chemistry; the physical structure of lakes; the different ways that algae, zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish have evolved to succeed in these habitats and interact with one another; and the impact of man on freshwater systems. Students must be available to participate in a mandatory weekend field trip to a lake on one of two weekends in late September or early October. Students not available for one of those weekends should not register for this course. Ancillary fees for this course apply. Please check the Departmental website for full details.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and CHM110H5 and CHM120H5
Exclusions: BIO332Y5 or BIO337H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/32P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO335H5 • Mycology

A study of the biology of fungi with emphasis on their life histories, morphology, classification, ecology and significance to man. Laboratory sessions include the collection, culture, and identification of a wide variety of fungi. In addition, several experiments illustrating important aspects of fungal physiology and development are performed in the laboratory.

Prerequisites: (BIO152H5 and BIO153H5) or any 200 level course in BIO.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO339H5 • Plant Identification and Systematics

Lectures provide an introduction to principles and underlying philosophy of plant classification, phylogenetic reconstructions, flowering plant, evolution, phylogeny, pollination, breeding systems, and speciation in plants. Laboratories focus on gaining proficiency in recognizing important plant families by sight and identifying unknown plants by using keys and published Floras.

Prerequisites: (BIO203H5 or BIO204H5) plus 0.5 credit from BIO205H5 and BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: EEB337H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO341H5 • Advanced Genetics

The following topics are covered at an advanced level: extensions to Mendelian genetics, linkage and advanced mapping analyses, mutation, extrachromosomal inheritance, quantitative genetics, population and evolutionary genetics and genetics of behaviour.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO342H5 • Evolutionary Biology

An introduction to the concepts and importance of evolutionary biology. The course will focus on how genetic variation arises and is maintained, mechanisms of evolutionary change and how these mechanisms lead to adaptation, sexual selection, speciation and co-evolution. Throughout the course we will consider how fossils, experiments, genetics and molecular systematics can be used to understand evolution.

Prerequisites: BIO207H5
Recommended Preparation: (BIO259H5 or BIO360H5 or STA215H5) (strongly recommended)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO347H5 • Epigenetics

Epigenetic phenomena play key roles in environmental interactions, development, and in disease. Underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate chromatin structure and gene expression are explored, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, or non-coding RNAs. Examples focus predominantly on eukaryotes (e.g. plants, insects, humans) and highlight how epigenetic marks are set, maintained, and involved in shaping phenotypic outcomes. The course will also enable students to apply knowledge and basic principles to recent scientific literature in this dynamic field.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: BIOD19H3 or CSB458H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO202H5 and BIO203H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO353H5 • Plant Development

The course addresses key concepts, with emphasis on unique plant-related aspects. Integrates plant development at the levels of the cell, tissue, organ and organism, with knowledge from diverse fields of Biology. Topics will include embryology, environmental interactions, signaling, developmental transitions, developmental diversity, evolution and development, and tools for discovery research.

Prerequisites: BIO203H5
Exclusions: CSB340H51
Recommended Preparation: None

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/10T/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO354H5 • Vertebrate Form and Function

The design and adaptive consequences of vertebrate structure. Mechanisms of locomotion, digestion, gas exchange, circulation and sensory perception are compared at the organ level. Students conduct individual laboratory dissections on selected vertebrates.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and [(BIO208H5 and BIO209H5) or BIO210Y5]

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO356H5 • Major Features of Vertebrate Evolution

The evolution of the vertebrates as evidenced by the fossil record. The origin and adaptive radiation of major groups including amphibians and reptiles is emphasized. Principles and knowledge will be demonstrated through written assignments and essays.

Prerequisites: (BIO208H5 and BIO209H5) or BIO210Y5Y

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO360H5 • Biometrics I

This course takes students from hypothesis testing to the application of testing means, chi-square tests, regression analysis and analysis of variance in Biology. Students will learn to choose an appropriate statistical test, independently analyze case studies with R software, and write empirical scientific reports.

Prerequisites: BIO259H5 or STA215H5 *STA215H5 will no longer be accepted as an appropriate prerequisite course AFTER 2022-2023 Academic year. Beginning 2023-2024 Academic year all students will be required to complete BIO259H5 as the statistics prerequisite course.
Exclusions: ECO220Y5 or PSY202H5 or STA221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO361H5 • Biometrics II

This course is a sequel to BIO360H5 in which topics in biological statistics are explored at an advanced level. Multiple regression, concepts of power, multi-factor analysis of variance, advanced experimental designs, logistic regression, Monte Carlo techniques, generalized linear models and principal component analyses are explored using R software.

Prerequisites: BIO360H5
Exclusions: ECO220Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO362H5 • Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics uses and develops computational tools to understand biological processes from the level of single molecules to whole genomes and organisms. The biotechnology revolution has meant that bioinformatics is now used in many cutting edge biological research areas from medicine to phylogenetics. This course will introduce core concepts, practices and research topics including DNA/Protein alignment, DNA sequence analysis, interacting with scientific databases, and genome sequencing technology. This course includes computer-based practicals wherein students will apply bioinformatic tools and be introduced to basic computer programming - no previous experience is required.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO368H5 • Medicinal Plants and Human Health

This botanical survey of medicinal plants integrates phytochemistry, ethnobotany, herbalism, pharmacology, and the molecular basis of human disease. It examines traditional herbal medicine and modern phytochemical research as sources of plant-based drugs used in the treatment of disease. The biosynthesis of therapeutic plant compounds and their mechanisms of action in the human body are emphasized. Students will critically examine and debate claims made in the health, herbal, and supplement literature.

Prerequisites: BIO203H5 and BIO206H5
Exclusions: NFS400H1
Recommended Preparation: CHM242H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO370Y5 • Microbiology

In-depth discussion of bacterial structure and ultrastructure; physiology and nutrition; growth and cultivation; nature of viruses (bacteriophage and a limited survey of animal viruses and their properties); microbial genetics; immunology; the role of micro-organisms in medicine, industry, agriculture and ecology.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: BIO371H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L/72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO371H5 • Microbiology Lectures

In-depth discussion of bacterial structure and ultrastructure; physiology and nutrition; growth and cultivation; nature of viruses (bacteriophage and a limited survey of animal viruses and their properties); microbial genetics; immunology; the role of micro-organisms in medicine, industry, agriculture and ecology.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: BIO370Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO372H5 • Molecular Biology

This course provides an overview of the field of molecular biology, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, genome structure, chromatin regulation, transcription cycle, RNA splicing, translation, and genetic code. The course will enable students to learn the fundamental concepts of molecular biology and master critical thinking and problem-solving in the field of molecular biology.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5 and CHM242H5
Exclusions: JBC372H5 or CHM360Y5 or JLM349H1 or MGB311Y1
Recommended Preparation: CHM361H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO373H5 • Environmental Microbiology

A lecture course on the interaction of microorganisms with other organisms and their environment. As the most abundant form of life, microorganisms have an enormous impact on the Earth. Subject areas include microbial evolution and biodiversity, metabolism and biogeochemical cycling, and how molecular biology has revolutionized our understanding of microbial life.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and BIO206H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO374H5 • Modern Biotechnology

This course is designed to introduce students to biotechnology and its applications in a variety of fields, including medicine, food & beverage, agriculture, forensics, fisheries and environmental protection. The course explores the principles and methods of genetic, tissue and organismal engineering involving species from bacteria to humans. The social and ethical issues associated with biotechnologies such as GMOs, stem cells and cloning will also be discussed. Topics include: Recombinant DNA Technology, Genomics & Bioinformatics, Protein Technology, Microbial Biotechnology, Plant Biotechnology, Animal Biotechnology, Forensic Biotechnology, Environmental Biotechnology, Aquatic Biotechnology, Medical Biotechnology, Biotechnology Regulations, and Careers in Biotechnology.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO375H5 • Introductory Medical Biotechnology

This course reviews a full range of discoveries from medical biotechnology, which includes drugs, smart phone apps, and medical devices. The course reviews a range of biotechnology products with respect to: regulatory path for experiments to support for new biotechnologies; key science concepts behind the technology, patents, and the business context.

Prerequisites: Completion of 2.0 credits in Biology, plus (BIO259H5 or BIO360H5 or STA215H5 or STA220H5 or PSY201H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO376H5 • Marine Ecology

This course addresses the diversity of marine life, and the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in marine ecosystems. Students will explore current methods and theories in marine ecology and consider the societal importance of marine resources with a special emphasis on Canada's coasts.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and BIO205H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO378H5 • The Biology of Marine Mammals: evolution, physiology, ecology and conservation

This course provides an introduction to the biological study of marine mammals and their populations. It explores the evolution of marine mammals, their adaptations to aquatic environments, as well as their population and behavioural ecology. The course also investigates threats to marine mammal populations and their national and global conservation.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and BIO202H5 and BIO205H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO380H5 • Human Development

Reproduction and embryonic development in humans are emphasized. After a general review of human reproduction, the formation of sperm and eggs is analyzed, followed by an in-depth analysis of fertilization in vivo and in vitro. Early embryonic developmental processes are studied with a view to how the embryo becomes organized so that all of the tissues and organs of the adult body form in the right places at the proper times. The course ends with an in-depth analysis of limb development and organ regeneration. The relevance of the material to such topics as human infertility, contraception, cloning, biotechnology and disease is continually addressed.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5 or BIO315H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides third year undergraduate students (after completion of at least 9.5 but not more than 14 credits), who have developed some knowledge of Biology and its research methods, another opportunity to work in the research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled have the opportunity to become involved in original research, enhance their research skills and share in the excitement of acquiring new knowledge and in the discovery process of science. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO400Y5 • Biology Internship

Through a part-time, unpaid, 200-hour work placement, fourth year students apply biology content and skills. Placements are made throughout the GTA in both the private (e.g. pharmaceutical or biotech companies) or public (e.g. Peel Region Medical Office, hospitals, Great Lakes Laboratory) sector. Biweekly class meetings plus year-end report and presentation are required. Students in a biology specialist program are given priority. Updated application information will be on-line at www.utm.utoronto.ca/intern by February 1st of each year. Please see the Internship Office (DV 3201D) for more information.

Prerequisites: Fourth year standing in Biology Specialist or Major Program, 3.0 CGPA and permission of instructor
Exclusions: Students may not have concurrent enrolment in any other internship, research, or ROP course.

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO403H5 • Developmental Neurobiology

An advanced student-led course examining contemporary topics in neurobiology. Students will read, criticize, and present on current areas of neurobiology, which could include the cell and molecular basis for neural disease, developmental neurobiology, sensory reception, neurophysiology, neural communication, and information processing.

Prerequisites: BIO304H5
Exclusions: BIO483H5 (Winter 2021)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO404H5 • Invertebrate Neurobiology

Neurobiology, the biological study of the nervous system, investigates the electrical and chemical processes animals use to regulate internal events and interface with their environments. Invertebrates have provided crucial neurobiological insights and are often more accessible study systems than vertebrates. This course addresses some key historical contributions, and discusses the future of invertebrate systems, where recent technological advances are opening up new ways to explore invertebrate neurobiology and evolution. Students will do practicals, using computer simulations of neurons, to develop an understanding of neurons and other excitable cells.

Prerequisites: BIO304H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO405H5 • Evolutionary Perspectives on Behaviour

Areas of focus may change from year to year. Each year, advanced topics considered will fall under one of more of the research areas of behavioural ecology, cognitive ecology, evolutionary neuroscience, and/or neuroethology and use as examples a variety of animals, sometimes including humans, and atypical model systems.

Prerequisites: BIO304H5 and (BIO320H5 or BIO318Y5 or BIO328H5)
Exclusions: PSY362H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO406H5 • Current Topics in Ecology and Evolution

A combination of lectures and tutorials. The course will emphasize group discussion and critiques of current publications in the field. The theme of the course is expected to be topical and current and to vary from year to year, with the interests of the faculty member(s) teaching the course. Course themes are expected to range from structure and function of whole ecosystems (e.g. the collapse of fisheries) to evolutionary ecology (e.g. the evolution of emergent diseases).

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and (BIO259H5 or STA215H5 or BIO360H5) *STA215H5 will no longer be accepted as an appropriate prerequisite course AFTER the 2022-2023 Academic year. Beginning in the 2023-2024 Academic year all students will be required to complete BIO259H5 or BIO360H5 as the statistics prerequisite course.
Recommended Preparation: BIO313H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO407H5 • Behaviour Genetics

State of the art techniques used in the genetic, molecular, statistical and neurobiological analysis of behaviour are discussed. We focus on behaviour-genetic analysis of olfaction, foraging, rhythms and sex in three model systems (the worm C. elegans, the fruit fly D. melanogaster and the mouse). We discuss how information from these model organisms can be used to shed light on behaviour genetics of non-model organisms including humans.

Prerequisites: BIO207H5 and BIO318Y5 and (BIO259H5 or BIO360H5 or STA215H5) *STA215H5 will no longer be accepted as an appropriate prerequisite course AFTER 2022-2023 Academic year. Beginning 2023-2024 Academic year all students will be required to complete BIO259H5 or BIO360H5 as the statistics prerequisite course.
Recommended Preparation: BIO206H5 and BIO215H5 and BIO304H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO408H5 • Neural Circuit Structure and Function

This course covers contemporary topics in systems neuroscience, focusing on the relationship between the circuit structure and function of mammalian brains. We review the current understanding of topics concerning signal transduction and the peripheral circuits, information processing in the central nerve system, neuronal cell types and connectivity, development and critical period plasticity of sensory cortices, and motor control. Students present and critique the latest research progress on these issues.

Prerequisites: BIO202H5 or BIO304H5 or Permission of Instructor.
Exclusions: BIO483H5 Winter 2019

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO409H5 • Laboratory in Animal Physiology

Experiments are designed to familiarize students with techniques and experimental design commonly used in the study of physiology. A one-hour lecture each week provides an experimental and theoretical basis for each laboratory. Topics include pharmacology, enzyme kinetics, neurophysiology, respiration, and metabolic rate.

Prerequisites: BIO304H5 and (BIO202H5 or BIO204H5 or BIO310H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO410H5 • Insect Physiology

A lecture course with a seminar component designed to introduce the student to the physiological characteristics of insects. The physiology of the integument, metamorphosis, reproduction, diapause and the physiological basis of insect control are discussed in detail.

Prerequisites: BIO202H5 or BIO204H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO411H5 • Topics in Molecular and Cellular Physiology

An advanced, student-led seminar course on contemporary subjects in cell physiology. Students will examine, review, criticize and present primary literature on fundamental topics such as ion transport, water transport, membrane excitability, intracellular transport, and secretion applied to a variety of physiological systems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how diverse cell types carry out specific physiological functions.

Prerequisites: BIO315H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO314H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO412H5 • Climate Change Biology

Climate change is affecting life on earth at all levels from cells to ecosystems. As a result, shifts in the distribution of species, the timing of biological events, and large impacts on natural resources, agriculture, and forestry may be seen. This course explores past climate, predictions of future climate, impacts of climate change on biological systems, and potentials for adaptation. Mitigation of climate change impacts on biological systems will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: BIO205H5 and (BIO202H5 or BIO203H5) and (GGR377H5 or BIO312H5 or BIO330H5 or BIO331H5 or BIO333H5)
Recommended Preparation: BIO313H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO414H5 • Advanced Integrative Physiology

The integration of cardiovascular, renal, respiratory and muscle physiology will be examined with a problem-based approach. The response of these systems to challenges such as altitude, depth under water, and exercise will be examined. Laboratory activities will give students hands on experience measuring physiological variables of these systems with primarily human subjects, while other examples will be used to examine the diversity of response to environmental challenges throughout the animal kingdom.

Prerequisites: BIO304H5 and BIO310H5
Exclusions: HMB472H1or KPE360H1 or KPE462H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/15T/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO416H5 • Field Course in Ecology

Students may choose from a variety of field courses offered through a cooperative arrangement among ecologists at ten Ontario universities. Courses involve a two-week period at a field site in early May or late August, and require a major paper or project report be submitted within six weeks of course completion. A fee for room and board is usually charged over and above tuition. Lists of courses available are posted at http://www.oupfb.ca/info.html   Please check this link in January for application dates. Information can also be found on the UTM Biology website. 



Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO417H5 • Molecular and Structural Genomics

Genetic information shapes almost all aspects of life. How is this information organized and inherited? How does it influence individuals and how does help to understand disease? The course explores the structure and function of chromatin i.e. the management of biological information. We will explore how the genome is packaged, expressed, replicated and repaired. We will look into chromosome sets and inheritance, accessibility of the genome to the molecular machinery, DNA repair, and modern techniques in research and diagnostics.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: BIO484H5 (Winter 2020)
Recommended Preparation: BIO347H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO419H5 • Molecular Aspects of Gene Regulation

Gene expression is regulated during development in multicellular organisms. The study of gene regulation is tightly linked to our understanding of cell types and functions. This course provides an overview of the molecular aspects of gene expression, including transcription, regulatory RNAs, chromatin regulation, and genomic regulation. Students will read, critique, and present recently published research articles on gene regulation in eukaryotes.

Prerequisites: (BIO207H5 and BIO372H5) or permission of instructor
Exclusions: BIO484H5 (Fall 2018) or MGY420H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO422H5 • Environmental Epigenetics

Organisms show a remarkable plasticity that allows them to grow and survive in an ever-changing environment. Epigenetic mechanisms provide a fascinating layer of regulation that integrates the genome and environment. In addition, epigenetic marks can contribute to lasting effects across generations without changes in the underlying DNA sequence. This course explores how plant and animal epigenomes respond to change such as stresses or developmental transitions. Influences on genome function, phenotype, and how epigenetic marks are transmitted will be discussed interactively drawing on recent primary literature and modern technological advances.

Prerequisites: BIO312H5 and BIO347H5
Exclusions: BIOD19H3
Recommended Preparation: BIO341H5 and BIO372H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO427H5 • Data Science in Biology

Biology has become a data-driven science with the arrival of complex datasets. Extracting information from these large-scale experiments requires approaches that unify statistics and computer science. The course will focus on strengthening mathematical intuition on core topics such as hypothesis testing and statistical models while connecting these to machine learning.

Prerequisites: BIO360H5
Exclusions: BIO429H5 or CSC311H1 or CSC311H5 or CSC413H1 or CSC413H5 or CSCC11H3 or STA314H1 or STA314H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO361H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO429H5 • Data analysis in Neurobiology

This course explains the fundamental principles of biological data analysis by focusing on neuroscience datasets. Students will learn methods for sampling data, testing hypotheses, multiple linear regression, PCA, clustering through both lectures and practical exercises. These methods will be discussed in the context of current research in understanding brain functions.

Prerequisites: BIO360H5 or permission of instructor
Exclusions: BIO427H5 or CSC311H1 or CSC311H5 or CSC413H1 or CSC413H5 or CSCC11H3 or STA314H1 or STA314H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO434H5 • Social and Developmental Determinants of Human Health

This course encourages students to explore the relationship between social conditions and health outcomes. Topics may vary across years. Topics include the importance of the early years, interactions between the environment and the genes, epigenetic influences on health, sensitive periods of development, the influence of nutrition on health, the interaction between social policy, medical care, social class and human health. The students direct the learning experience in groups as they engage in case-based and problem-based learning. Note: Students interested in this course must contact the Biology Undergraduate Advisor to enroll.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO443H5 • Phylogenetic Principles

Lectures will provide an in-depth coverage of modern methods of phylogenetic reconstruction including molecular systematics based on DNA sequences. The principles and philosophy of classification will be taught with an emphasis on 'tree-thinking', one of the most important conceptual advances in evolutionary biology. Tutorials will focus on recent developments in the study of evolutionary patterns while gaining proficiency in reading, presenting, and critiquing scientific papers.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5
Exclusions: EEB462H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO259H5 or BIO314H5 or BIO360H5 or STA215H5 or PSY201H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO444H5 • Urban Field Ecology and Evolution

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of urban ecology and evolution using the Greater Toronto Area as a model to study the topic. The course will focus on understanding how ecological and evolutionary processes are influenced by urban development, human behaviour, and the built environment, and how the environment can feed back to shape cities and socio-ecology, including human behaviour and well-being. Students will be introduced to principles of the scientific process including making observations, stating hypotheses, experimental design, conducting experiments, data collection, statistical analysis and interpretation, and scientific writing and oral presentations. The course will focus on all major habitats in urban areas to understand how urban environmental change of air, water and land influence the ecology and evolution of populations, communities and ecosystems.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and (BIO205H5 or BIO342H5) and (BIO259H5 or STA215H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 14L/98P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO445H5 • Evolutionary Ecology

This course focuses on the interface between ecology and evolution. Research has shown that biotic and abiotic ecological factors drive evolution, and in turn, evolution feeds back to influence the ecological processes and patterns of populations and communities. Throughout this course we will focus on this dynamic interplay over short and long time spans in animals, plants, fungi, and other microbes. While covering the concepts and questions of this field we will also consider the theory, methods, and statistics used to bring new insights to evolutionary ecology. Students will be expected to participate in discussions, present methods and concepts to the class, and complete written assignments.

Prerequisites: BIO342H5
Exclusions: EEB324H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO458H5 • Genomics

The genome has been referred to as the blueprint of life and consists of the full complement of genes and genetic material carried by an organism. The ongoing revolution in DNA sequencing allows biologists to observe the variety of genetic and genomic structures that underpin the diversity of life. In addition, applications of genomic technologies have facilitated new fields of research such as personalized medicine and evolutionary genomics. The lectures will focus on the diversity of genomic structures, their functions and evolutionary origins. The course also has computer-based practicals that provide hands-on training with cutting-edge bioinformatic tools for analysis of genome-scale datasets and next generation sequencing data.

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5 and (BIO362H5 or CSC108H5) and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO464H5 • Conservation and Biodiversity

Biodiversity is the sum of species diversity, and also the interaction of species at population, at ecosystem and at migration-route levels; it is one barometer of environmental health. Conservation biology applies ecological and genetic principles to the problem of declining biodiversity. We discuss the species concept, quantification and cost-benefit analysis of biodiversity and extinction, causes, consequence, diagnosis and treatment of population declines, as well as the effects of different land uses on biodiversity and reserve design. A key part of this course is a case study by each student. Note: Students from a wide range of programs are encouraged to enrol.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and BIO205H5 and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO475H5 • Virology

Virology examines the biology of viruses infecting all forms of life including humans and other animals, plants, eukaryotic microorganisms, and bacteria. The scope ranges from the molecular biology of virus replication to virus evolution and ecology. Current issues surrounding virology and society are incorporated into the course including vaccines, emerging viruses, and even consideration of practical applications of viruses.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor and (BIO370Y5 or BIO371H5 or BIO372H5)
Exclusions: CSB351Y1
Recommended Preparation: BIO373H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO476H5 • Molecular Basis of Disease

This advanced course explores the primary concepts of pathogenesis and investigates current research in the field of molecular pathology. Specific disease topics include inflammation, injury and repair, neoplasia, immune disorders, infectious disease, cardiovascular disease, and toxicology. Analysis of the primary literature is a key component of this course.

Prerequisites: BIO310H5 and BIO315H5
Recommended Preparation: BIO341H5 and BIO372H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO477H5 • The Human Genome and Cancer Biology

The first part of the course examines the structure and molecular biology of the human genome. Topics will include: the sequencing of the human genome; variation between genomes; and various aspects of functional genomics such as a brief overview of how gene expression is regulated and how genomics is being utilized in health and medicine. Techniques such as high throughput sequencing will be covered. The second part of the course examines the molecular and genetic basis of cancer including the role of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cell cycle regulating proteins in the development of this disease. It also looks at cancer from a functional genomics perspective. Lectures and seminars involve presentations and discussion of recently published research articles.

Prerequisites: (BIO370Y5 or BIO372H5) and permission of instructor
Exclusions: MGY470H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO314H5 and BIO315H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO481Y5 • Biology Research Project

Students in this course will conduct a research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Biology. The course is open to third and fourth year students. Students learn how to design, carry out, and evaluate the results of a research project. Students are required to write and present a research proposal, write a term paper, and present a seminar on the results of their research project. All students interested in a research project must approach potential faculty supervisors several months in advance of the beginning of term. Students must obtain permission from the faculty member whom they would like to serve as their project supervisor. Students must meet with the course coordinator periodically throughout the academic year.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Exclusions: BIO400Y5 or JCB487Y5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO483H5 • Selected Topics in Biology I

The focus of this advanced course will reflect the expertise and research of the Instructor. Students will actively participate in the discussion, criticism and interpretations of recent scientific papers. Implications and applications of these research advances will be explored. Current year's topic will be listed on the Biology department website. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200 and/or 300 level prerequisites core course requirement(s) will be posted on the Biology departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

BIO484H5 • Selected Topics in Biology II

The focus of this advanced course will reflect the expertise and research of the Instructor. Students will actively participate in the discussion, criticism and interpretations of recent scientific papers. Implications and applications of these research advances will be explored. Current year's topic will be listed on the Biology department website. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate 200 and/or 300 level prerequisites core course requirement(s) will be posted on the Biology departmental website along with the Special Topics title and description prior to course registration.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CBJ481Y5 • Independent Project in Bioinformatics

This course is intended for students in the Bioinformatics Specialist degree program. Possible areas in which the research may take place include: functional genomics (e.g., microarray and proteomic data analysis); systems biology; and the development of novel analytical methods for large datasets. Students will be required to produce a written document of their project and present it orally. In order to enrol in this course, students must obtain, several months in advance, approval from a faculty member(s) who will serve as supervisor(s).

Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Corequisites: BIO477H5
Recommended Preparation: CSC343H5 and BIO372H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM101H5 • The Science of Human Health

This course is intended for humanities and social science students who wish to gain knowledge of the science behind our well-being that may help them to make personal, social and political decisions in their future. Chemistry will be taught on a need-to-know basis in order to consider some contemporary applications. The course will focus on three themes in the realm of human health: nutrition for the prevention of disease, diagnostic tests for the detection of disease and drug discovery for the treatment of disease. Among the questions that may be addressed are "What is the nutritional difference between vitamins from foods and those from supplements?", "Should ketchup be considered a vegetable?", "How do diagnostic strips work?", "What advances in microfluidics have provided inexpensive diagnostics for use in remote areas?", "How are drug targets identified?", and "What is the path from drug discovery to bringing a drug to market?". The roles of nutritional, analytical and medicinal chemistry in these processes will be studied. (Please note the course exclusion: Students are ineligible to register for this course if they have taken any previous or current CHM/JCP course).

Exclusions: CHM201H5 and any CHM/JCP course taken previously or concurrently

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM110H5 • Chemical Principles 1

Matter and its transformations are studied at the macroscopic level. Topics include stoichiometry, phases of matter, equilibria, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.

Prerequisites: Grade 12 Chemistry (SCH4U) (minimum grade of 70) and Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U0) (minimum grade of 70) and Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U) highly recommended
Corequisites: Recommended Corequisite: (MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5); this recommended corequisite is a prerequisite for all 200 level CHM courses.
Exclusions: CHM135H1 or CHM151Y1 or CHM140Y5 or CHMA11H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM120H5 • Chemical Principles 2

Building on the subject matter of CHM110H5, molecular events are studied at the microscopic level. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, intermolecular forces of attraction, reaction kinetics, and organic chemical reactions and mechanisms.

Prerequisites: CHM110H5
Corequisites: Recommended Corequisite: (MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5); this recommended corequisite is a prerequisite for all 200 level CHM courses.
Exclusions: CHM136H1 or CHM151Y1 or CHM140Y5 or CHMA10H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM211H5 • Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry

A rigorous introduction to the theory and practice of analytical chemistry. Development and applications of basic statistical concepts in treatment and interpretation of analytical data; direct and indirect precipitations; volumetric methods; acid-base, complexometric, redox and precipitation titrations; introduction to instrumental methods; potentiometry and absorption spectroscopy. Applications in biomedical, forensic and environmental areas will be considered.

Prerequisites: CHM110H5 and a minimum grade of 60% in CHM120H5 and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5)]
Exclusions: CHM217H1 or CHMB16H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM231H5 • Inorganic Chemistry I

Atomic structure; periodic properties of the elements; bonding theories-ionic, covalent (valence bond and molecular orbital) and metallic; structure and bonding in coordination compounds of main group elements and transition metals; descriptive chemistry of the metals. Reaction mechanisms.

Prerequisites: CHM110H5 and a minimum grade of 60% in CHM120H5 and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5)].
Exclusions: CHM238Y1 or CHMB31H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/10T/28P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM242H5 • Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Fundamentals of organic chemistry emphasizing reactions of alkanes and alkenes. The first half of a two-course sequence (with CHM243H5) required in the Chemistry major and specialist programs.

Prerequisites: CHM110H5 and a minimum grade of 60% in CHM120H5 and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5)].
Exclusions: CHM136H1 or CHMB41H3 or CHMB43Y3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM243H5 • Introductory Organic Chemistry II

The chemistry of benzene, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid, esters, acid chlorides, amides and amines will be covered. As well, electrophilic aromatic substitution, protection and deprotection of alcohols, nucleophilic acyl substitution, nucleophilic addition, carbonyl alpha-substitution reaction, keto-enol tautomerism, carbonyl condensation and amines will be introduced. The emphasis will be on organic mechanisms and application of organic reactions to multistep synthesis. Continues from CHM242H5.

Prerequisites: CHM242H5
Exclusions: CHM247H1 or CHM249H1 or CHMB42H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. This course does not count as one of the requirements in the Chemistry Minor, Chemistry Major, Chemistry Specialist or Biological Chemistry Specialist programs. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 4.0 credits and no more than 10.0 credits, which must include CHM110H5 and CHM120H5 with a minimum grade of 60% and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5)].

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM311H5 • Instrumental Analytical Chemistry

Introduction to the basic theory and practice underlying important techniques in analytical chemistry, chosen from three major areas of instrumental analysis: spectroscopy, electrochemistry and separation science. Specific topics will include fluorescence spectroscopy, atomic spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, voltammetry, high resolution gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and a brief introduction to computer applications, including Fourier transform methods. A problem-based approach will be used to explore these methods in a wide variety of practical applications, which will include individualized student assignments.

Prerequisites: CHM211H5
Exclusions: CHM317Y1 or (CHMC16H3 and CHMC11H3)
Recommended Preparation: JCP221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM323H5 • Introduction to Computational Chemistry

This course covers the foundations of computational chemistry with a focus on practical applications and does not require a background in programming or quantum mechanics. An array of methods for predicting the structural, electronic, thermodynamic, and spectroscopic properties of chemical species will be addressed, as well as how the calculated results can complement experimental observations. Relevant fundamental theories to computational chemistry will be covered on a need-to-know basis. Students will follow an individualized study path and select the chemical systems to which each method will be applied.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Recommended Preparation: CHM231H5 and JCP221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM331H5 • Inorganic Chemistry II: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Chemistry of metallic elements. Organometallics. Main group and transition elements. Rings, cages and clusters. Lanthanides and Actinides. Applications of IR, UV-VIS and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. Symmetry. Inorganic synthesis. Non-aqueous solvents. Structure and bonding. Catalysis and industrial processes.

Prerequisites: CHM231H5 and CHM242H5
Corequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM338H1 or CHMC31Y3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM333H5 • Bioinorganic Chemistry

Principles of inorganic chemical reactions and their application to biochemical systems: kinetics, mechanisms and thermodynamics of ligand exchange, acid-base and redox reactions involving metalloproteins and their model compounds; mechanisms of catalysis by metalloenzymes and their model compounds; metal ion related diseases; metals in chemotherapy.

Prerequisites: CHM231H5 and CHM242H5
Corequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM437H1 or CHMD69H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM341H5 • Organic Chemistry: Mechanism and Structure

Stereochemistry and conformational analysis; mechanisms of important types of organic reaction; pericyclic reactions; reactive intermediates.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM348H1 or CHMC41H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM345H5 • Organic Synthesis

Methods used for forming carbon-carbon bonds will be reviewed, including reactions of the various types of nucleophilic carbon and the use of organometallic reagents. Other topics include functional group interconversions, oxidation and reduction and the role of elements such as boron, silicon and tin in organic synthesis.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM342H1 or CHMC42H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM347H5 • Organic Chemistry of Biological Compounds

The chemistry of selected classes of naturally occurring molecules such as those below, with emphasis on structure, stereochemistry, properties and synthesis. Amino acids, peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleosides, nucleotides, and nucleic acids.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM347H1 or CHMC47H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM361H5 • Structural Biochemistry

An introduction to the molecular anatomy and properties of the major cellular biomolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. The course also covers the structural organization of membranes and other macromolecular complexes. Enzyme mechanisms and membrane transport phenomena will be examined in the context of quantitative analyses these processes and of structure/function relationships.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Exclusions: BCH210H1 or BCH242Y1 or BCH311H1 or BIOC12H3 or CHMB62H3
Recommended Preparation: BIO206H5 and JCP221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM362H5 • Metabolism and Bioenergetics

Basic principles of biological energetics. Metabolic pathways for carbohydrate and lipid synthesis and degradation. Survey of amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. Integration and cellular regulation of metabolism. Intracellular signal transduction mechanisms.

Prerequisites: CHM361H5
Exclusions: BCH210H1 or BCH242Y1 or BIOC13H3 or CHMB62H3
Recommended Preparation: BIO206H5 and JCP221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM372H5 • Techniques in Biological Chemistry I

The first in a sequence of two laboratory courses intended to complement CHM361H5 and CHM362H5. Experiments are designed to familiarize students with techniques commonly used to study the chemical and physical properties of biological molecules. Topics covered in the first half also include a wide range of chromatographic and/or fractionation methods to separate proteins and/or subcellular organelles, enzyme kinetics, electrophoresis to study proteins and their complexes. The theoretical basis for each experiment will be covered in a 1-hour lecture each week.

Prerequisites: CHM243H5
Corequisites: CHM361H5
Exclusions: CHM371H5 or BCH370H1 or BCH371H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM373H5 • Techniques in Biological Chemistry II

The second in a sequence of two laboratory courses intended to complement CHM361H5 and CHM362H5. CHM373H5 carries on from CHM372H5 with a particular emphasis on protein purification, enzyme kinetics and protein characterization (e.g., kinetics, reactions, binding, depending on the protein studied). Techniques covered include classic biochemical techniques used in studying proteins and protein complexes, such as chromatography and fluorescence methods. The theoretical basis for each experiment will be covered in a 1-hour lecture each week.


Prerequisites: CHM372H5
Corequisites: CHM361H5
Exclusions: CHM371H5 or BCH370H1 or BCH371H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM394H5 • Chemical Synthesis Laboratory I

The first in a sequence of two laboratory courses in synthetic chemistry. This laboratory course comprises the synthesis of inorganic and organic compounds supplemented by physical measurements (e.g., ir, uv, 1H NMR spectra, magnetic susceptibility, etc.) of the products where appropriate. Approximately six weeks each will be spent on two groups of foundational experiments, one in organic and one in inorganic synthesis to illustrate techniques of chemical synthesis. The central role of the carbonyl group in organic synthesis is elaborated, an organic unknown is identified both chemically and spectroscopically and the synthetic chemistry of the first row transition elements is explored.

Prerequisites: CHM231H5 and CHM243H5
Exclusions: CHM393H5Y

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM395H5 • Chemical Synthesis Laboratory II

The second in a sequence of two laboratory courses in synthetic chemistry that builds on the foundations established in CHM394H5. Students choose their own experiments in this course from offerings comprising the synthesis of organic, organometallic and inorganic compounds and in computational chemistry. Techniques such as working at low temperatures and in inert atmospheres (e.g., glove box) are introduced. Depending on the experiments actually chosen, a mixed organic unknown is separated and identified, organic rearrangements and the synthetic chemistry of elements from across the Periodic Table including main group, transition elements and lanthanides are explored. A highlight is an optional four week independent synthesis project in any area of synthetic chemistry adapting procedures from the published, including recent, research literature.

Prerequisites: CHM394H5
Corequisites: (CHM331H5 or CHM333H5) and (CHM341H5 or CHM345H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM396H5 • Analytical and Physical Chemistry Instrumentation Laboratory I

This analytical and physical chemistry laboratory course represents an integration of the study of fundamental physical chemistry with wide-ranging applications to instrumental methods of analysis, such as separation science, electrochemistry and spectroscopy. The course will provide a solid hands-on grounding in many of the major topics covered in analytical and physical chemistry, and the optimization of instrumental analytical measurements by the application of physical principles. Students select from a variety of instruments to customize their program, and develop their own analytical methods to address analytical problems of interest to the student.

Prerequisites: CHM211H5 and JCP221H5
Exclusions: CHM391H5 or CHM317H1 or CHM410Y1 or CHMC16H3
Recommended Preparation: CHM311H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM397H5 • Analytical and Physical Chemistry Instrumentation Laboratory II

This analytical and physical chemistry laboratory course carries on from CHM396 to introduce more advanced topics in instrumental methods of analysis and physical chemistry concepts. The course will include experimental modules focused on instrument design and computer interfacing, molecular spectroscopy (e.g. fluorescence, infrared and Raman, and NMR), plasmon resonance methods for biomolecule determinations and kinetic analysis, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technologies. The course will provide practical experience in the optimization of instrumental analytical measurements, experiment design, and topics of relevance to research in analytical and physical chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHM396H5
Corequisites: CHM311H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides third-year undergraduate students (after completion of 8.0 credits) who have developed some knowledge of Chemistry and its research methods, an opportunity to work in the research project of a professor in return for course credit. Students enrolled have the opportunity to become involved in original research, enhance their research skills and share in the excitement of acquiring new knowledge and in the discovery process of science. This course does not count as one of the requirements in the Chemistry Minor program. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: 8.0 credits, including CHM110H5 and CHM120H5 with a minimum grade of 60% and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5)] and 2.0 credit of CHM/ JCP at the 200-level.

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM412H5 • Analytical Methods of Biomolecule Analysis

An exploration of biomolecule analysis methodologies, with an emphasis on nucleic acid analysis, will be done from the perspective of the Analytical Biochemist. The course will begin with brief reviews of the structure and function of biomolecules, solid-phase synthesis, extraction, pre-concentration and amplification methods. This will be followed by an exploration of established and emerging techniques for target biomolecule determinations, including: bioprobes, microarrays, biosensors and DNA sequencing technologies (including single molecule approaches). Current examples of implementation in the fields of proteomics and genomics will be discussed throughout the course, with an emphasis on life sciences and diagnostic testing applications. Course work will include independent literature reviews and student presentations.

Prerequisites: CHM311H5
Recommended Preparation: CHM243H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM414H5 • Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry

An overview of both recent and fundamental developments of instrumentation that are revolutionizing the field of analytical chemistry, with an emphasis on applications in biological chemistry and biotechnology. Topics will include specialized mass spectrometry techniques, including secondary ion, fast atom bombardment and ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry methods; GC/MS and LC/MS interfaces; a survey of surface-oriented techniques including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, attenuated total reflection methods, total internal reflection fluorescence methods; Fourier transform theory and methods; microcomputer interfacing and chemometrics. Course work will include independent literature reviews and student presentations.

Prerequisites: CHM311H5
Recommended Preparation: JCP321H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM416H5 • Separations, Chromatography and Microfluidics

Separation science will be explored by building on a survey of fundamental physical principles to understand processes of extraction, and technologies such as solid phase microextraction, supercritical fluid extraction, immunoaffinity extraction and molecularly imprinted polymers. Plate and rate theory will be developed to consider various forms of gas and liquid chromatographic methods, including hyphenated techniques that bridge to information detectors such as mass spectrometers. New opportunities for chromatography and separations by movement to small scale size will be considered by focusing on microfluidics, electro-osmotic flow and chip based microdevice applications. Applications examples will focus on problems in life sciences, forensics and environmental chemistry. Course work will include independent literature reviews and student presentations.

Prerequisites: CHM311H5
Exclusions: CHM416H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM436H5 • Metal-based Chemistry for Synthesis of Small Molecules and Functional Materials

Modern metal-mediated (inorganic) reactions useful in organic synthesis. Applications of advanced organometallic chemistry. Selected solid-state compounds: metal-organic frameworks, nanoparticles and related materials for separation, catalysis, diagnostics.

Prerequisites: CHM231H5 and CHM243H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM442H5 • Strategy & Control in Modern Drug Synthesis

Applications of advanced fundamentals to, and recent developments in, multi-step organic synthesis.

Prerequisites: CHM341H5 or CHM345H5
Recommended Preparation: CHM394H5 and CHM395H

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM444H5 • An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Recognition

An introduction to drug discovery, design and development. This course will focus on the potential of proteins (enzymes, receptors, receptor structure and signal transduction) as targets for molecular therapeutic intervention. The strategies of finding a drug target, optimizing target interactions and synthetic molecular therapeutic development will all be considered and discussed. The modern technologies of targeting protein-protein interactions will also be covered.

Prerequisites: CHM361H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM462H5 • Advances in Chemical Biology

Discussion course based on published research in biological chemistry and applications of chemistry to study processes of biological significance.

Prerequisites: CHM361H5
Recommended Preparation: CHM347H5 and CHM371H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM485H5 • Dissertation Based on Literature Research

A dissertation will be written based on literature research of a topic of current interest in the field of chemistry. The research will be conducted under the supervision of a chemistry faculty member other than the student's CPS489Y5 supervisor. The research topic must not overlap that of the student's CPS489Y5 project. The goals of this course are to achieve literature research expertise as well as in-depth knowledge of a particular chemistry topic, while perfecting scientific writing and oral presentation skills. Evaluation is based on a final written report describing the aims and results of the research, as well as an oral presentation of the work. The course is normally taken in the student's fourth year, in either the Fall or Winter terms, but may be taken in the Summer term. Enrolment in CHM485H5 requires submitting an application to the department before the end of the term prior to that in which it is intended to undertake the research. Independent Studies Application Forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Applications should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration on ACORN is also required. Students are encouraged to consult with, and obtain the consent of, prospective supervisors before applying for enrolment. 

Prerequisites: 2.5 CHM/JCP credits at 300 level.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHM489Y5 • Introduction to Research in Chemistry

An experimental or theoretical research topic in chemistry will be investigated under the supervision of a chemistry faculty member other than the student's CHM485H5 supervisor. The research topic must not overlap that of the student's CHM485H5 research topic. In addition to learning to plan, conduct and evaluate a research program, students will receive training in written and oral presentation skills. Evaluation is based on interim and final written reports describing the aims and results of the research, as well as interim and final oral presentations of the work. The course is normally taken in the student's fourth year. Enrolment in CHM489Y5 requires submitting an application to the department in the spring term, with the application due date being the final day of classes. Independent Studies Application Forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Applications should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration on ACORN is also required. Acceptance into the course is dependent on the student having achieved a satisfactory GPA, and reaching agreement with a potential supervisor. Students must consult with prospective supervisors before applying for enrolment, and must list at least two faculty members as possible supervisors. This course is restricted to students in the Chemistry Major, Biological Chemistry Specialist, and Chemistry Specialist Programs.

Prerequisites: 2.0 300 level credits in CHM/JCP and 1.0 credit from BIO206H5 and BIO314H5 and CHM372H5 and CHM373H5 and CHM394H5 and CHM395H5 and CHM396H5 and CHM397H5 and PHY324H5, with 0.5 credits from the 300-level CHM laboratory courses listed.
Exclusions: CHM499Y1 or JCB487Y5 or CHMD90Y3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 240P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CPS398H5 • Teaching Opportunity Program in Sciences

A scholarly, active learning project in which students integrate and apply their understanding of science and pedagogy by observing, actively participating in, and reflecting on the teaching and learning process under the supervision of an experienced instructor/mentor. This course may be taken in either the Summer, Fall or Winter terms. Enrolment requires submitting an application to the department before the end of the term prior to that in which it is intended to undertake the research. Independent Studies Application Forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Students should plan for the course in March of the previous academic year and register as soon as their registration period begins. Students are encouraged to consult with, and obtain the consent of, prospective supervisors before applying for enrolment. Enrolment will depend on the availability of positions.

Prerequisites: This course is "by Instructor Approval". At least 10.0 courses completed and enrolment in a life, mathematical, or physical science major or specialist program; an average of B-(CGPA 2.7) or higher.

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 30L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CPS400Y5 • Chemical and Physical Sciences Internship

This internship opportunity will allow students to apply theoretical and practical skills acquired during their undergraduate education in order to gain vital industry experience. Students will be trained in effective job searching skills (writing a CV and a Cover Letter, participating in job interviews) and will gain valuable experiences that are sought after by employers in both public and private sectors. Students will be placed with various employers in the GTA based on their interest and skill set, and on the employer needs and availability. The placement is a 200 h unpaid internship. The Course Coordinator/Instructor(s) will schedule biweekly meetings to discuss the setup and progress of the student projects. Student attendance is mandatory. At the end of the term, students must submit a written report and prepare an oral presentation about the outcomes of their work experience. In order to be considered for the internship, students must apply for the course. The Course Coordinator will approve enrolment in the course based on the number of internship opportunities available, which will vary from year-to-year, and student qualifications (e.g. GPA, experience, qualifications related to the requirements of the available placement(s), and interview performance).

Prerequisites: For Chemistry Internships (CHM372H5 or CHM394H5 or CHM396H5) and an additional 1.0 credit from any 300/400 level CHM/JCP/JBC/BCH/FSC courses. For Earth Science/Geology Internships: (ERS301H5 and ERS303H5) and an additional 1.0 credit from any 300/400 level courses. For Physics Internships: (PHY324H5 and PHY347H5) and an additional 1.0 credit from any 300 or 400 level PHY/JCP courses.
Recommended Preparation: For Chemistry Internships: (CHM373H5 or CHM395H5 or CHM397H5) For Earth Science & Geology Internships: ERS302H5 and ERS311H5 and ERS401H5 For Physics Internships PHY325H5 and PHY332H5 and PHY333H5

Enrolment Limits: Students must be in their fourth year of study and registered in one of following Programs: Chemistry Major, Chemistry Specialist, Biological Chemistry Specialist, Earth Science Major, Earth Science Specialist, Geology Specialist, Physics Major, Biomedical Physics Specialist.
Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CPS401Y5 • Research and Development in Science Education

This course is intended for students in a CPS or Environmental Science Major or Specialist program. It provides an experiential learning opportunity with secondary school students and teachers. Students will research the literature of science pedagogy and acquire pedagogical content knowledge, particularly that of problem-based learning and the use of case studies. Then, through the creation of original, problem-based learning materials for Grades 11 and 12 classes and the preparation of teachers’ notes for these materials, they will enhance their subject specialization knowledge. They will then assist a teacher in implementing their materials in a school or, where the materials involve experiments, in the field or in the UTM teaching laboratories. The course is normally taken in the student's fourth year. Enrollment requires submitting an application to the CPS Department in the spring term, with the application due date being the final day of classes. Independent Studies Application Forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Applications should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration on ACORN is also required.

Prerequisites: Enrolment in a CPS or Environmental Science Major or Specialist program with a minimum CGPA of 2.7 and 9.0 credits, including at least 2.0 credits at the 200-level in CHM or ERS or ENV or GGR or PHY

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 240P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CPS489Y5 • Introduction to Research in the Chemical and Physical Sciences

Students will work toward the completion of an experimental or theoretical research project in an area of study within the chemical and physical sciences, namely, astronomy, chemistry, earth sciences or physics. Projects will be based on current trends in research and students will work to complete their projects with guidance provided by a team of facilitators and faculty advisors consisting of course coordinators and a researcher from the Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences. In addition to the rigorous development of research skills, the course will also provide students with training and practical experience in project management techniques and practical research, literary and communications skills development. CPS489Y5 requires submitting an application to the department Application forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Applications should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant.

Prerequisites: (2.0 credits at the 300 level from BIO or CHM or JBC or JCP or ERS or ESS or PHY) and (1.0 credit from BIO206H5 or BIO314H5 or CHM372H5 or CHM373H5 or CHM394H5 or CHM395H5 or CHM396H5 or CHM397H5 or ERS201H5 or ERS202H5 or PHY324H5 or PHY347H5 or JCP321H5 or JCP322H5 or PHY325H5 or PHY332H5 or PHY333H5 or PHY343H5 or PHY351H5)
Exclusions: BIO400Y5 or BIO481Y5 or CBJ481Y5 or CHM489Y5 or ERS470Y5 or ERS471H5 or ERS472H5 or PHY489Y5 or BCH472Y1 or BCH473Y1 or CHM499Y1 or CSB497H1 or CSB498Y1 or CSB499Y1 or ESS491H1 or ESS492Y1 or MGY480Y1 or PHY478H1 or PHY479Y1 or BIOD98Y3 or CHMD90Y3 or CHMD91H3 or ESSD09H3 or ESSD10H3 or PSCD10H3

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 240P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC104H5 • The Why and How of Computing

A broad introduction to the field of computer science, intended for non-computer scientists. Topics include: history of computing; digital information representations; computer chip logic design; cryptography; social issues in computing; operating systems; problem solving and algorithms; a challenging programming introduction. This is a rigorous course intended to teach computer science, and will not teach the use of any particular software products. A robust understanding of modern computers and their use is assumed.

Exclusions: any CSC course

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC108H5 • Introduction to Computer Programming

Structure of computers; the computing environment. Programming in a language such as Python. Program structure: elementary data types, statements, control flow, functions, classes, objects, methods, fields. List: searching, sorting and complexity.

Prerequisites: Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U).
Exclusions: CSC108H1 or CSC120H1 or CSCA08H3 or CSCA20H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC148H5 • Introduction to Computer Science

Abstract data types and data structures for implementing them. Linked data structures. Encapsulation and information-hiding. Object-oriented programming. Specifications. Analyzing the efficiency of programs. Recursion. This course assumes programming experience in a language such as Python, C++, or Java, as provided by CSC108H5. Students who already have this background may consult the Computer Science faculty advisor for advice about skipping CSC108H5.

Prerequisites: CSC108H5
Exclusions: CSC148H1 or CSCA48H3 or CSC111H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC199H5 • Computer Science Seminar

Introduction to a topic of current interest in computer science intended for a general audience. Content will vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC207H5 • Software Design

An introduction to software design and development concepts, methods, and tools using a statically-typed object-oriented programming language such as Java. Topics from: version control, build management, unit testing, refactoring, object-oriented design and development, design patterns, advanced IDE usage, regular expressions, and reflection. Representation of floating-point numbers and introduction to numerical computation.

Prerequisites: 60% in CSC148H5 (Only CSC148H5 taken at the UTM campus will be accepted.)
Exclusions: CSC207H1 or CSCB07H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC209H5 • Software Tools and Systems Programming

Software tools and development in a Unix/Linux environment, using a machine-oriented programming language (typically C). Core topics: software tools (shell utilities and make), processes and program execution, the memory model, system calls, file processing, interprocess communication (pipes and signals), and an introduction to concurrency, including multithreading.

Prerequisites: CSC207H5
Exclusions: CSC209H1 or CSCB09H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC236H5 • Introduction to the Theory of Computation

Mathematical induction; correctness proofs for iterative and recursive algorithms; recurrence equations and their solutions (including the "Master Theorem"); introduction to automata and formal languages.

Prerequisites: CSC148H5 and MAT102H5
Exclusions: CSC236H1 or CSC240H1 or CSCB36H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC258H5 • Computer Organization

An introduction to computer organization and architecture, using a common CPU architecture. Core topics: data representations and computer arithmetic, processor organization, the memory hierarchy and caching, instruction set and addressing modes, and quantitative performance evaluation of computing systems. Students will program in assembly and will evaluate simulated processor architectures.

Note:
Students wishing to complete CSC385H1 (Microprocessor Systems) should consider enrolling in CSC258H1 and/or to self-study the use of hardware design languages to create digital logic.

Prerequisites: CSC148H5
Exclusions: CSC258H1 or CSCB58H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC263H5 • Data Structures and Analysis

Algorithm analysis: worst-case, average-case, and amortized complexity. Standard abstract data types, such as graphs, dictionaries, priority queues and disjoint sets. A variety of data structures for implementing these abstract data types, such as balanced search trees, hashing, heaps and disjoint forests. Design, implementation and comparison of data structures. Introduction to lower bounds.

Prerequisites: CSC207H5 and CSC236H5 and (STA107H5 or STA246H5 or STA256H5 or ECO227Y5)
Exclusions: CSC263H1 or CSC265H1 or CSCB63H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC290H5 • Communication Skills for Computer Scientists

Targeted instruction and significant practice in the communications required for careers in computer science. The curriculum covers written, oral and interpersonal communication. Students will hand in short pieces of writing each week, will make oral presentations several times in the semester, and will work together in simulated project meetings and other realistic scenarios of pair and small group interaction. This can be used to satisfy the writing requirement in CSC programs.

Prerequisites: CSC148H5
Exclusions: CSC290H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC300H5 • Computers and Society

Privacy and Freedom of Information; recent Canadian legislation and reports. Computers and work; employment levels, quality of working life. Electronic fund transfer systems; transborder data flows. Computers and bureaucratization. Computers in the home; public awareness about computers. Robotics. Professionalism and the ethics of computers. The course is designed not only for science students, but also those in social sciences or humanities.

Prerequisites: Any CSC half-course and CGPA 2.0
Exclusions: CSC300H1 or CSCD03H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC301H5 • Introduction to Software Engineering

An introduction to agile development methods appropriate for medium-sized teams and rapidly-moving projects. Basic software development infrastructure; requirements elicitation and tracking; estimation and prioritization; teamwork skills; basic UML; design patterns and refactoring; security.

Prerequisites: CSC209H5
Exclusions: CSC301H1 or CSCC01H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC309H5 • Programming on the Web

An introduction to software development on the web. Concepts underlying the development of programs that operate on the web; survey of technological alternatives; greater depth on some technologies. Operational concepts of the internet and the web, static client content, dynamic client content, dynamically served content, n-tiered architectures, web development processes, and security on the web. Assignments involve increasingly more complex web-based programs.

Prerequisites: CSC209H5 and CSC263H5
Exclusions: CSC309H1 or CSCC09H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC310H5 • Information Theory

An introduction to reliable and accurate transmission of information. Entropy, lossless and lossy data compression, optimal compression, information channels, channel capacity, error-correcting codes, and digital fountain codes. Course concepts form the basis for practical applications such as ZIP and MP3 compression, channel coding for DSL lines, communication in deep space and to mobile devices, CDs and disk drives, the development of the Internet, as well as linguistics and human perception.

Prerequisites: CSC148H5 and MAT223H5 and (STA246H5 or STA256H5 or ECO227Y5)
Exclusions: CSC310H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC311H5 • Introduction to Machine Learning

An introduction to methods for automated learning of relationships on the basis of empirical data. Classification and regression using nearest neighbour methods, decision trees, linear models, and neural networks. Clustering algorithms. Problems of overfitting and of assessing accuracy. Basics of reinforcement learning.

Prerequisites: CSC207H5 and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT232H5 and (STA246H5 or STA256H5)
Exclusions: CSC411H5 or CSC311H1 or CSCC11H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC318H5 • The Design of Interactive Computational Media

User-centered design of interactive systems. Methodologies, principles, metaphors, task analysis, and other topics. Interdisciplinary design; the role of industrial design and the behavioural sciences. Interactive hardware and software; concepts from computer graphics. Classes of direct manipulation systems, extensible systems, rapid prototyping tools. Additional topics in interactive computational media. Students work on projects in interdisciplinary teams. Enrolment limited, but non-computer scientists welcome. 

Prerequisites: CSC207H5
Exclusions: CSC318H1 or CSCC10H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC322H5 • Introduction to Algebraic Cryptography

(Cross list with MAT302H5) The course will take students on a journey through the methods of algebra and number theory in cryptography, from Euclid to Zero Knowledge Proofs. Topics include: block ciphers and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES); algebraic and number-theoretic techniques and algorithms in cryptography, including methods for primality testing and factoring large numbers; encryption and digital signature systems based on RSA, factoring, elliptic curves and integer lattices; and zero-knowledge proofs.

Prerequisites: (MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT301H5
Exclusions: MAT302H5 or MATC16H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC324H5 • Principles of Programming Languages

Major topics in the development of modern programming languages. Syntax specification, type systems, type inference, exception handling, information hiding, structural recursion, run-time storage management, and programming paradigms. Two non-procedural programming paradigms: functional programming (illustrated by languages such as Lisp, Scheme, ML or Haskell) and logic programming (illustrated by languages such as Prolog, XSB or Coral).

Prerequisites: CSC207H5 and CSC236H5
Exclusions: CSC324H1 or CSCC24H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC333H5 • Forensic Computing

Introduction to the tools and techniques of the digital detective. Electronic discovery of digital data, including field investigation methods of the computer crime scene. Focus on the computer science behind computer forensics, network forensics and data forensics. Forensic topics include: computer structure, data acquisition from storage media, file system analysis, network intrusion detection, electronic evidence, Canadian computer crime case law.

Prerequisites: CSC209H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC338H5 • Numerical Methods

Computational methods for solving numerical problems in science, engineering and business. Linear and non-linear equations, approximation, optimization, interpolation, integration and differentiation. The aim is to give students a basic understanding of floating-point arithmetic and the implementation of algorithms used to solve numerical problems, as well as a familiarity with current numerical computing environments.Course concepts are crucial to a wide range of practical applications such as computational finance and portfolio management, graphics and special effects, data mining and machine learning, as well as robotics, bioinformatics, medical imaging and others.

Prerequisites: CSC148H5 and (MAT134H5 or MAT136H5 or MAT139H5 or MAT159H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT233H5) and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5) and (CSC263H5 or 1.0 MAT credit at the 200+ level).
Exclusions: CSC336H1 or CSC350H5 or CSC350H1 or CSC351H1 or CSCC37H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC343H5 • Introduction to Databases

Introduction to database management systems. The relational data model. Relational algebra. Querying and updating databases: the query language SQL. Application programming with SQL. Integrity constraints, normal forms, and database design. Elements of database system technology: query processing, transaction management.

Prerequisites: CSC263H5
Exclusions: CSC343H1 or CSCC43H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC347H5 • Introduction to Information Security

An investigation of many aspects of modern information security. Major topics cover: Techniques to identify and avoid common software development flaws which leave software vulnerable to crackers. Utilizing modern operating systems security features to deploy software in a protected environment. Common threats to networks and networked computers and tools to deal with them. Cryptography and the role it plays in software development, systems security and network security.

Prerequisites: CSC209H5 and CSC236H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC358H5 • Principles of Computer Networks

Introduction to computer networks and systems programming of networks. Basic understanding of computer networks and network protocols. Network hardware and software, routing, addressing, congestion control, reliable data transfer, and socket programming.

Prerequisites: CSC209H5 and CSC258H5 and CSC263H5
Exclusions: CSC358H1 or CSC457H1

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC363H5 • Computational Complexity and Computability

Introduction to the theory of computability: Turing machines, Church's thesis, computable and non-computable functions, recursive and recursively enumerable sets, reducibility. Introduction to complexity theory: models of computation, P, NP, polynomial time reducibility, NP-completeness, further topics in complexity theory.

Prerequisites: (CSC236H5 or CSC238H5) or MAT202H5
Exclusions: CSCC63H3 or CSC463H1

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC367H5 • Parallel Programming

Introduction to aspects of parallel programming. Topics include computer instruction execution, instruction-level parallelism, memory system performance, task and data parallelism, parallel models (shared memory, message passing), synchronization, scalability and Amdahl's law, Flynn taxonomy, vector processing and parallel computing architectures.

Prerequisites: CSC209H5 and CSC258H5
Exclusions: CSC367H1

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC369H5 • Operating Systems

Principles of operating systems. The operating system as a control program and as a resource allocator. Core topics: processes and threads, concurrency (synchronization, mutual exclusion, deadlock), processor, scheduling, memory management, file systems, and protection.

Prerequisites: CSC258H5 and CSC209H5
Exclusions: CSC369H1 or CSCC69H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC373H5 • Algorithm Design and Analysis

Standard algorithm design techniques: divide-and-conquer, greedy strategies, dynamic programming, linear programming, randomization, network flows, approximation algorithms and others (if time permits). Students will be expected to show good design principles and adequate skills at reasoning about the correctness and complexity of algorithms.

Prerequisites: CSC263H5
Exclusions: CSC373H1 or CSC375H1 or CSCC73H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC375H5 • Algorithmic Intelligence in Robotics

Robots of the future will need to operate autonomously in unstructured and unseen environments. It is imperative that these systems are built on intelligent and adaptive algorithms. This course will introduce fundamental algorithmic approaches for building an intelligent robot system that can autonomously operate in unstructured environments such as homes and warehouses. This course introduces the broad philosophy of “Sense-Plan-Act”, and covers algorithms in each of these areas -- how should the robot perceive the world, how to make long term decisions and how to perform closed-loop control of articulated robots.

Prerequisites: CSC209H5 and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5) and (STA246H5 or STA256H5) and CSC376H5
Recommended Preparation: CSC258H5 and CSC301H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC376H5 • Fundamentals of Robotics

An introduction to robotics covering basic methodologies, tools, and concepts to build a foundation for advanced topics in robotics. The course covers robot manipulators; kinematics; motion planning; and control. Topics covered in lecture will be implemented and explored in a practical environment using robots from different application domains.

Prerequisites: (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5) and CSC209H5 and CSC258H5
Recommended Preparation: CSC338H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC384H5 • Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Theories and algorithms that capture (or approximate) some of the core elements of computational intelligence. Topics include: search, logical representations and reasoning, classical automated planning, representing and reasoning with uncertainty, learning, decision making (planning) under uncertainty. Assignments provide practical experience, in both theory and programming, of the core topics.

Prerequisites: CSC263H5 and (STA246H5 or STA256H5 or ECO227Y5)
Exclusions: CSC384H1 or CSCD84H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC389H5 • Computing Education

Introduction to computing education research (CER) and pedagogical content knowledge. Introduction to learning theories and their application to computing. Foundational and influential CER work. High-impact practices and practical applications to evaluation, assessment, and feedback. This course is writing intensive.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and 1.0 CSC credit at the 200 level

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC392H5 • Computer Science Implementation Project

This course involves a significant implementation project in any area of Computer Science. The project may be undertaken individually or in small groups. The project is offered by arrangement with a Computer Science faculty member.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 8.0 credits and Permission of Instructor

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC393H5 • Computer Science Expository Work

This course involves a significant literature search and expository work in any area of Computer Science. This work must be undertaken individually. It is offered by arrangement with a Computer Science faculty member.


Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC397H5 • Topics in Computer Science

Introduction to a topic of current interest in computer science intended for CSC majors and specialists. Content will vary from year to year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, T, P) from year to year, but will be between 24-48 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate prerequisite requirement(s) will be available on the UTM timetable along with the topic title prior to course registration.

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC398H5 • Topics in Computer Science

Introduction to a topic of current interest in computer science intended for CSC majors and specialists. Content will vary from year to year. This course may include a practical or tutorial component, depending on the topic chosen for the year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, T, P) from year to year, but will be between 24-48 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate prerequisite requirement(s) will be available on the UTM timetable along with the topic title prior to course registration.

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their third or fourth year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 399Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC404H5 • Video Game Design

An introduction to the concepts and techniques for the design and development of electronic games. Topics include: game history, social issues and story elements. The software engineering, artificial intelligence and graphics elements for video games. Level and model design. Audio elements. Real-world aspects of the gaming industry, including the business of game development, design teams and game promotion. Assignments test practical skills in game development, with a team implementation of a complete video game as a course project.

Prerequisites: Two of (CSC301H5 or CSC318H5 or CSC384H5 or CSC418H1)
Exclusions: CSC404H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC409H5 • Scalable Computing

We investigate computation in the large -- utilizing many CPUs with large amounts of memory, large storage and massive connectivity -- to solve computationally complex problems involving big data, serving large collections of users, in high availability, global settings. Our investigation covers both theoretical techniques and current, applied tools used to scale applications on the desktop and in the cloud. Topics include caching, load balancing, parallel computing and models of computation, redundancy, failover strategies, use of GPUs, and noSQL databases.

Prerequisites: CSC309H5 and CSC369H5 and CSC373H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC413H5 • Neural Networks and Deep Learning

An introduction to neural networks and deep learning. Backpropagation and automatic differentiation. Architectures: convolutional networks and recurrent neural networks. Methods for improving optimization and generalization. Neural networks for unsupervised and reinforcement learning.

Prerequisites: CSC311H5 or CSC411H5
Exclusions: CSC321H5 or CSC321H1 or CSC413H1 or CSC421H1

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC415H5 • Introduction to Reinforcement Learning

Reinforcement learning is a powerful paradigm for modeling autonomous and intelligent agents interacting with the environment, and it is relevant to an enormous range of tasks, including robotics, game playing, consumer modeling and healthcare. This course provides an introduction to reinforcement learning intelligence, which focuses on the study and design of agents that interact with a complex, uncertain world to achieve a goal. We will study agents that can make near-optimal decisions in a timely manner with incomplete information and limited computational resources. The course will cover Markov decision processes, reinforcement learning, planning, and function approximation (online supervised learning). The course will take an information-processing approach to the concept of mind and briefly touch on perspectives from psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy.

Prerequisites: CSC311H5
Exclusions: CSC498H5 (Winter 2021 and Fall 2021)

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC420H5 • Introduction to Image Understanding

This class is an introduction to fundamental concepts in image understanding, the sub-discipline of artificial intelligence that tries to make the computers "see". It will survey a variety of interesting vision problems and techniques. Specifically, the course will cover image formation, features, object and scene recognition and learning, multi-view geometry and video processing. It will also feature recognition with RGB-D data. The goal of the class will be to grasp a number of computer vision problems and understand basic approaches to tackle them for real-world applications.

Prerequisites: CSC263H5 and (CSC338H5 or CGPA 3.5)
Exclusions: CSC420H1

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC422H5 • Cryptography and Computational Complexity

A rigorous introduction to the theory of cryptography from the perspective of computational complexity. The relationship of cryptography to the "P=NP" question. As time permits, topics will be chosen from: (i) definitions of different kinds of pseudorandom generators, relationships between them, and ways of constructing them; (ii) secure sessions using shared private key cryptography and public key cryptography; (iii) signature schemes.

Prerequisites: CSC363H5
Recommended Preparation: MAT301H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC423H5 • Computer Forensics

Investigation of digital devices that contain evidence, including mobile and handheld devices. Topics include the analysis of memory dumps, event logs, and application caches using existing digital forensic tools as well as the development of new tools to uncover evidence and to work around the use of anti-forensics. Tools and investigations must be clearly documented, so this course contains a significant writing component.

Prerequisites: CSC333H5 and CSC369H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC427H5 • Computer Security

Network attacks and defenses, operating system vulnerabilities, application security (e-mail, Web, databases), viruses, spyware, social engineering attacks, privacy and digital rights management. The course will cover both attack techniques and defense mechanisms.

Prerequisites: CSC347H5 and CSC369H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC428H5 • Human-Computer Interaction

Understanding human behaviour as it applies to user interfaces: work activity analysis, observational techniques, questionnaire administration and unobtrusive measures. Operating parameters of the human cognitive system, task analysis and cognitive modelling techniques and their application to designing interfaces. Interface representations and prototyping tools. Cognitive walkthroughs, usability studies and verbal protocol analysis. Case studies of specific user interfaces.

Prerequisites: CSC318H5 and (STA246H5 or STA256H5 or ECO227Y5)
Exclusions: CSC428H1
Recommended Preparation: A course in PSY and CSC209H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC458H5 • Computer Networks

Computer networks with an emphasis on systems programming of real networks and applications. Computer network architectures, protocol layers, network programming, and performance analysis. Transmission media, encoding systems, switching, multiple access arbitration. Network routing, congestion control, flow control. Transport protocols, real-time, multicast, social networks.

Prerequisites: CSC209H5 and CSC258H5 and CSC263H5
Exclusions: CSC458H1 and CSCD58H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC469H5 • Operating Systems Design and Implementation

An in-depth exploration of the major components of operating systems with an emphasis on the techniques, algorithms, and structures used to implement these components in modern systems. Project-based study of process management, scheduling, memory management, file systems, and networking is used to build insight into the intricacies of a large concurrent system.

Prerequisites: CSC369H5
Exclusions: CSC469H1

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC475H5 • Introduction to Reinforcement Learning

This course provides an introduction to reinforcement learning intelligence, which focuses on the study and design of agents that interact with a complex, uncertain world to achieve a goal. The course covers Markov decision processes, reinforcement learning, planning, and function approximation (online supervised learning). Applications to computer vision, robotics, etc. are explored, and common RL algorithms are analyzed and implemented.

Prerequisites: CSC311H5 and STA256H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC476H5 • Introduction to Continuum Robotics

An introduction to continuum robots. Topics include continuum robot design; mechanisms and actuation; kinematic modeling; motion planning and control; and sensing. Topics covered in the lecture will be implemented and explored in a practical environment using continuum robots.

Prerequisites: CSC338H5 and CSC376H5 and MAT224H5
Recommended Preparation: CSC384H5 and CSC411H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC477H5 • Introduction to Mobile Robotics

An introduction to mobile robotic systems from a computational, as opposed to an electromechanical, perspective. Definitional problems in robotics and their solutions both in practice and by the research community. Topics include algorithms, probabilistic reasoning and modeling, optimization, inference mechanisms, and behavior strategies.

Prerequisites: CSC209H5 and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT232H5 and (STA246H5 or STA256H5) and CSC376H5
Recommended Preparation: CSC384H5 and CSC311H5 and MAT224H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC478H5 • Robotic Perception

This course focuses on perception algorithms for robotics applications and sensors. The aim is to provide an understanding of the challenges encountered when deploying perception algorithms on a robot and introduce some of the tools and algorithms typically used to address these challenges. The algorithms will also be implemented and evaluated using real-world data from common use-cases.

Prerequisites: CSC373H5 and (CSC311H5 or CSC321H5) and CSC376H5
Exclusions: CSC498H5 (Winter 2022)
Recommended Preparation: CSC338H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC479H5 • Advanced Algorithms for Robotics

Enabling safe and interactive robotic autonomy requires broad technical capabilities for perception, decision-making, and control. Building such capabilities involves numerous complex design decisions and algorithmic challenges. Following upon a first exposure to robotics, this course will provide advanced algorithmic and learning based tools for the development and deployment of intelligent robotic systems. It will focus on presenting state estimation, robotic vision, and learning-based planning and control techniques and present these techniques in different robotic application settings.

Prerequisites: CSC311H5 and CSC375H5
Recommended Preparation: CSC376H5 and CSC413H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC488H5 • Compilers and Interpreters

Compiler organization, compiler writing tools, use of regular expressions, finite automata and content-free grammars, scanning and parsing, runtime organization, semantic analysis, implementing the runtime model, storage allocation, code generation.

Prerequisites: CSC258H5 and CSC263H5 and CSC324H5
Exclusions: CSC488H1
Recommended Preparation: CSC209H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC490H5 • Capstone Design Course

This course gives students experience solving a substantial problem that may span several areas of Computer Science. Students will define the scope of the problem, develop a solution plan, produce a working implementation, and present their work using written, oral and (if suitable) video reports. Class time will focus on the project, but may include some lectures. The class will be small and highly interactive. Topics, themes and required preparation will vary by instructor.

Prerequisites: Appropriate prerequisite requirement(s) will be available on the UTM timetable along with the topic title prior to course registration.
Exclusions: CSC490H1 or CSC491H1

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC492H5 • Computer Science Implementation Project

This course involves a significant implementation project in any area of Computer Science. The project may be undertaken individually or in small groups. The project is offered by arrangement with a Computer Science faculty member.

Prerequisites: At least three 300-level CSC half-courses and permission of the department.
Exclusions: CSC494H1 or CSC495H1 or CSCD94H3 or CSCD95H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC493H5 • Computer Science Expository Work

This course involves a significant literature search and expository work in any area of Computer Science. This work must be undertaken individually. It is offered by arrangement with a Computer Science faculty member.

Prerequisites: At least three 300-level CSC half-courses and permission of the department.

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC496H5 • Topics in Robotics

Introduction to a topic of current interest in robotics intended for CSC majors and specialists. Content will vary from year to year but will always maintain a robotics focus. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, T, P) from year to year, but will be between 24-48 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: CSC376H5. Additional required prerequisite(s) will be available on the UTM timetable along with the topic title prior to course registration.

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC497H5 • Topics in Computer Science

Introduction to a topic of current interest in computer science intended for CSC majors and specialists. Content will vary from year to year. This course may include a practical or tutorial component, depending on the topic chosen for the year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, T, P) from year to year, but will be between 24-48 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate prerequisite requirement(s) will be available on the UTM timetable along with the topic title prior to course registration.

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC498H5 • Topics in Computer Science

Introduction to a topic of current interest in computer science intended for CSC majors and specialists. Content will vary from year to year. This course may include a practical or tutorial component, depending on the topic chosen for the year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, T, P) from year to year, but will be between 24-48 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate prerequisite requirement(s) will be available on the UTM timetable along with the topic title prior to course registration.

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CSC499Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their third or fourth year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 499Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Computer Science Specialist, Information Security Specialist, Bioinformatics Specialist or Computer Science Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENV100Y5 • The Environment

This introductory environmental science course examines large-scale features of Earth, natural hazards, Earth's climate and weather systems, energy and mineral resources, human population growth, extinction and biodiversity, environmental toxins, vanishing soils and expanding deserts, forests, urban environmental management, and food resources. Interdisciplinary interaction among Science, Social Science, and Humanities is a major theme.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

ENV330H5 • Experimental Design in Environmental Science

This hands-on course introduces students to field methods and integrative problem solving in environmental sciences. Topics will include sampling methods and protocols employed in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric assessment and monitoring, as well as experimental design, data analysis and presentation. Practical sessions will involve outdoor field experiences on campus and neighboring areas.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits, including the completion of a 100-level quantitative and basic scientific credit, and completion of a 200/300-levek quantitative methods course and enrolment in an Environmental Science program.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENV332H5 • Practicum in Environmental Project Management

Solutions to environmental issues depend on interdisciplinary teamwork.  This course mimics the practical, multidisciplinary, collaborative work  that is highly valued in the environment sector.  Students work in teams on semester-long projects addressing a specific environmental issue on campus or in the local community (e.g., conducting a waste audit; developing an educational module for a local NGO, etc.).  Specific skills that are developed include; project management and workflow, data collection, report writing and formal presentations.   This course is strongly recommended for Specialist and Major students in any of the Environment Programs.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits and completion of a Research Methods course (e.g., GGR277H5).
Exclusions: ENV232H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science, Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENV490H5 • Special Topics in Environmental Studies

These courses highlight various topics of special interest in environmental studies. The specific focus and format of the course will vary, depending on the chosen topic. The course will not be offered every year. Please check with the Academic Counsellor, Sabrina Ferrari (905-828-5465), for further information. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits including ENV100Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENV495H5 • Restoration Ecology I

Restoration ecology is an emerging cross-disciplinary field of study that concerns human activities undertaken to promote the recovery, health, integrity and sustainability of degraded ecosystems. This course introduces the fundamental concepts of ecological restoration, addressing topics such as assessing ecosystem health, resilience, resistance and stability; community structure and biodiversity; invasive species; ecosystem processes and functions; societal aspects of ecological restoration (e.g., the relationship between social, economic and environmental sustainability).

Prerequisites: 14 credits including ENV100Y5 or BIO205H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENV496H5 • Restoration Ecology II

The follow-up course to Restoration Ecology I, ENV496H5 will build on its theoretical foundations to focus on student involvement in a variety of restoration projects planned or underway by Credit Valley Conservation and other groups in Mississauga and the greater Credit Valley watershed. The emphasis here is on planning and implementation of restoration projects; good scientific design; understanding policies and procedures; identifying and working with stakeholders, etc. Occasional field exercises may be scheduled during regular class meeting times.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits including ENV495H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENV497H5 • Environmental Research Project

This independent project course is designed to give students experience in the definition and execution of a one-term research study on an environmental topic, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member or who have an idea for a research project should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the terms of the project.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits towards an Environmental Specialist or Major program and permission of instructor

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science, Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS101H5 • Planet Earth

We discuss the age and origin of the Earth, the nature of its deep interior, the origin of mountains, oceans, earthquakes and volcanoes, and show how these features are related in a unifying theory known as Plate Tectonics, that explains how the evolution of the Earth's surface is driven by internal processes. Practicals will include laboratory exercises devoted to the understanding and recognition of minerals, rocks and geological structures.

Exclusions: ESS102H1 or ESS105H1 or EESA07H3 or EESB15H3 or ERS120H5
Recommended Preparation: Review of Grade 9/10 Physical Science.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS111H5 • Earth, Climate & Life

Life as we know it is completely dependent on our planet. The Earth is an integrated system, where the ocean, atmosphere, life and planet interact with and affect one another. The evolution of the smallest organisms has drastically changed Earth’s climate, and small changes in Earth’s climate have a profound effect on the distribution of life. Understanding how organisms feed, breath, grow, and reproduce are integral to mitigating large-scale climate changes and organic cycles, and how this will affect the Earth as a system. Processes such as plate tectonics produces an ever changing surface, and has been a major control on how and when life evolved and flourished. After introducing how the Earth works, topics discussed will include how life on Earth has evolved, how large-scale geological processes affect climate and life and how ecosystems have changed in response to weather and climate change. We will also discuss the effect that our species has had on this planet; from the sudden shifts in stability of Earth’s systems, to feedback cycles, to use of resources and sustainability.

Exclusions: ERS103H5 or ESS103H1 or ESS102H1 or EESA05H3 or EESA06H3 or EESB15H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS201H5 • Earth Materials

To truly understand the Earth, and the rocks that form it, we must study their basic building blocks – minerals. Minerals are all around us; in rocks and sediments, in soils, in our bones and teeth, and in building materials. This course will examine the complex nature of minerals and crystals from a geological, physical and chemical perspective and will introduce the petrology of volcanic rocks, intrusive plutonic rocks, metamorphic rocks formed in the depths of mountain ranges and sedimentary rocks deposited through time. The course will train students in the use of optical mineralogy (rock slices under a microscope); a key analytical method in petrology and by doing so aims to provide students with detailed knowledge and skills inherent to all geologists, and to give a unique perspective of the Earth from the study of the small scale minerals and rocks.

Prerequisites: ERS101H5 or ERS111H5 or ERS103H5 or ERS120H5 or ENV100Y5
Exclusions: ESS321H1 or ESS221H1 or EESC35H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS202H5 • Dynamic Earth

An introduction to geological time and the dynamic evolution of the surface of the Earth. Lectures discuss the processes involved in the deformation of Earth's crust including mechanical principals, stress, and strain. Particular focus on the structure of rocks. Practical exercises focus on the geometry of rock units and determining the geological history of an area from information presented in geological maps, cross sections, and stereographic projections.

Prerequisites: ERS201H5 or permission of instructor
Exclusions: ESS241H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS203H5 • Magmatic Systems and Igneous Petrology

To truly understand the Earth, and the rocks that form it, we must study their basic building blocks – minerals. Minerals are all around us; in rocks and sediments, in soils, in our bones and teeth, and in building materials. This course will examine the complex nature of minerals and crystals from a geological, physical and chemical perspective and will introduce the petrology of volcanic rocks, intrusive plutonic rocks, metamorphic rocks formed in the depths of mountain ranges and sedimentary rocks deposited through time. The course will train students in observations and interpretations of minerals in hand samples and in the use of optical mineralogy (rock slices under a microscope). These are key analytical methods in petrology and by doing so aims to provide students with detailed knowledge and skills inherent to all geologists, and to give a unique perspective of the Earth from the study of the small scale minerals and rocks.

Prerequisites: ERS201H5
Exclusions: ESS322H1 and ERS222H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS211H5 • Sedimentology and Stratigraphy

Sedimentology and stratigraphy concerns the origin, formation, accumulation, alteration, and preservation of sediments in the geological record. This course will focus on the reconstruction, correlation, and interpretation of ancient carbonate and siliciclastic paleoenvironments and facies based on the analysis of sedimentary structures, depositional environments, stratigraphic successions, and fossils. The interplay between biological and geological factors responsible for sedimentary deposits will form the core of the course, including the physical transport and biological accumulation of sediments, the effects of climate-driven sea-level change on sediment deposition, the importance of resource management and sustainability. This course will include a laboratory component with hand samples, thin sections, and physical models, in addition to a field trip, allowing for first-hand experience with describing and interpreting sedimentological units.

Prerequisites: ERS101H5 or ERS120H5 or ERS111H5 or ERS103H5 or ENV100H5
Exclusions: ESS331H1 or ESS332H1 or ERS313H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS225H5 • Field Methods

Fieldwork is at the heart of being a geologist. Skills gained during fieldwork are key as part of a Geologist’s toolbox, and are highly regarded in a career. This course introduces fieldwork to students during a week-long fieldtrip in late August looking at outcrops of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks around Ontario. Skills taught will include basic geological observation, description and interpretation, the collection of field notes, geological measurements and presentation of the data. Enrolment approval into the course is by application only; Registration in ACORN is required; priority will be given to Earth Science Specialists, or Environmental Geoscience Specialists. Please see the UTM CPS Earth Science Fieldtrip page for more information.

Prerequisites: ERS101H5 or ERS120H5 or ERS111H5 or ERS103H5 or ENV100H5
Corequisites: ERS201H5
Exclusions: ERS325H5 or ERS425H5 or ESS234H1 or ESS324H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 66P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS301H5 • Geochemistry

Since the creation of the Solar System and Earth 4.5 billion years ago, Earth’s natural processes have differentiated the chemical elements, generating distinct differences in composition between the oceans and the atmosphere, and Earth’s crust, mantle and core. These differences allow Earth Scientists to understand and quantify these processes, as well as track the rocks and deposits formed out of these processes. This course will focus on the application of geochemistry to understand Earth processes, such as the generation of magma and volcanic eruptions, the formation of ore bodies and Earth surface processes. We will utilize the state-of-the-art equipment available at UTM, including Scanning Electron Microscopy and ICP-OES, to analyze rock samples to determine their origin based on their chemistry, giving students valuable skills in sample preparation and experimental practices.

Prerequisites: 1.5 credits from (ERS201H5 or ERS202H5 or ERS203H5 or ERS211H5 or ERS225H5) or permission of instructor.
Exclusions: ENV233H1 or ESS311H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS302H5 • Tectonics

This course will focus on how the plate tectonic system works, from the composition and structure of the earth, to the evolution of plate tectonics through Earth history, to modern tectonic hazards including earthquakes and volcanoes. A major portion of the course will focus on the analysis and interpretation of major structural provinces as they relate to Earth's plate boundary interactions including convergent, divergent, and transform settings.

Prerequisites: ERS202H5 and 1.0 credits from (ERS201H5 or ERS203H5 or ERS211H5 or ERS225H5)
Exclusions: ESS445H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS303H5 • Geophysics

This course will focus on important geophysical concepts and methods that are used to understand the interior of the Earth and the theory of Plate Tectonics. Major topics include gravity, isostasy, magnetism, heat flow, and seismology. Students will learn to apply basic geophysical equations to address real-life geoscience problems. They will also be introduced to common applied-geophysical techniques used for subsurface sensing, with applications to resource exploration and engineering and environmental studies.

Prerequisites: [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or MAT137Y5] and [(PHY136H5 and PHY137H5) or (PHY146H5 and PHY147H5)] and ERS202H5 and 1.0 credits from (ERS201H5 or ERS203H5 or ERS211H5 or ERS225H5).
Exclusions: JPE395H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS304H5 • Geological Remote Sensing

This course is an introduction to remote sensing technologies and geological applications. Students will learn about imaging of the Earth by electromagnetic waves and the state-of-the-art remote sensing systems and technologies for geological mapping and exploration. Topics may include remote sensing fundamentals and physical principles, remote sensing systems for geological applications, geological mapping and resource exploration. Students will also acquire skills in image processing, data integration, information extraction, and validation for geological applications.

Prerequisites: 1.5 credits from any 200 level ERS course
Exclusions: GGR337H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS311H5 • Sedimentology and Basin Analysis

This course will focus on principles of correlation, facies concepts, dynamic processes, and their geologic records in modern and ancient sedimentary environments, with focus on basins. Factors that influence sedimentary formation and evolution will be investigated, including sea level and sediment supply. Emphasis will be placed on sequence stratigraphic approaches to the evaluation of sedimentary systems. Sustainable management of oil, water, and gas resources within sedimentary basins will be covered.

Prerequisites: ERS211H5 and 1.0 credits from (ERS201H5 or ERS202H5 or ERS203H5 or ERS225H5)
Exclusions: ESS331H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS312H5 • Oceanography

The world’s oceans cover approximately 70% of the Earth Surface and Canada has extensive coastlines along three major ocean basins. This course will provide an understanding of chemical, biological, physical and geologic aspects of the oceans. Emphasis will be placed on the geological and geophysical processes that form and shape the ocean basins and continental margins. In addition, this course will offer an insight into the paleoceanographic evolution of our planet and present day environmental threats such as pollution, habitat destruction, acidification and ocean warming. Even though this course does not include specific lab or tutorial sessions, three relevant exercises will be included.

Prerequisites: ERS201H5 or ERS202H5 or ERS203H5 or ERS211H5 or GGR214H5 or GGR217H5 or GGR227H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS315H5 • Environmental Geology

This course will focus on Earth processes as they relate to human activities. Topics include sustainability global climate change on short and long timescales; groundwater flow and contamination/human engineering of Earth processes; geological aspects of pollution and waste disposal; and environmental impact of extracting/using minerals, energy, soil, and other Earth resources. A field trip will give students a first-hand experience in aspects of human/planet interaction.

Prerequisites: Two of: ERS201H5 or ERS202H5 or ERS203H5 or ERS211H5
Exclusions: ESS205H1 or JEE337H1 or EESA05H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS325H5 • Field Camp I

This course, held on the north shore of Lake Huron in the summer, covers geological mapping skills, stratigraphic section measurements, and the recognition of rock types, fossils and geological structures in an authentic field-based learning environment in order to interpret ancient geological environments (approx. 12 days of field instruction). Students in this course receive an instructor lead introduction to the regional geology at whitefish falls, Ontario, before engaging in individual or small group projects in which geologic maps of a defined region will be assembled over 5-6 days of student-led field work. Students will complete an oral field examinations at the end of the field days. Students must pay a course fee, which includes transportation and accommodation at the camp, but does not include the cost of food nor does it cover any course fees charged by the Office of the Registrar. Note: This course is identical to ESS330H1 (formerly GLG340H1). U of T Mississauga students must register in the Summer Session, and provide consent waivers and the course fee to the Undergraduate Assistant for Earth Sciences in the Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences. This field camp is usually held in early May. Registration and fee payment deadline: mid-March. For specific yearly course information, please see the UTM CPS Earth Science Fieldtrip page for more information on dates, required field gear and other information.

Prerequisites: ERS202H5 and ERS203H5
Exclusions: ESS330H1 (formerly GLG340H1) or ESSC16H3, D07H3

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS381H5 • Special Topics in Earth Sciences

A survey of current thinking in Earth science. Topics may include obtaining data in the field or lab and analyzing it, an interdisciplinary research project, and supervised readings. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Enrolment in ERS Major or ERS Specialist or Environmental Geosciences Specialist or Geology Specialist Program and 1.0 ERS or ESS 300-level credits
Exclusions: ESS381H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for third or higher year students to work on the research project of a professor in earth sciences in return for 399Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, enhance their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project description for the following summer and fall/winter session on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS401H5 • Earth Resources

The formation and global distribution of precious and industrial mineral deposits are introduced. Exploration methods and mining practices are discussed in terms of environmental effects and issues. Basic aspects of the economics and strategic importance of mineral reserves are also covered. Weekly field trips are included.

Prerequisites: ERS201H5 and ERS202H5 and ERS203H5
Exclusions: ERS419H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS402H5 • Advanced Structural Geology

This course will cover stress, strain and rheology, the analysis and interpretation of structural features in complexly folded and faulted strata and in plutonic and metamorphic rocks, and basic rock mechanics. Methods include strain analysis, stereographic projection, construction of balanced cross-sections, and geomorphometry.

Prerequisites: ERS202H5 and 1.0 credits from (ERS201H5 or ERS203H5 or ERS211H5 or ERS225H5)
Exclusions: ESS441H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS403H5 • Earthquake Seismology

Why do earthquakes occur and how do they cause damage? What is a seismogram and what can it tell us about earthquakes and the Earth’s structure? Earthquakes tend to strike suddenly and without warning. Because of their destructive power, tremendous efforts and monetary resources are dedicated to advancing earthquake science and designing effective hazard mitigation controls. This course will provide an overview of the physics of earthquakes and seismic wave propagation, and current seismic hazard mitigation plans and policies. Concepts covered in this course include stress and strain relations, elastic wave equation, body and surface waves, seismic instrumentation and data, global earth structure, earthquake location, seismic source theory, earthquake mechanics, ground motion, the seismic cycle and earthquake recurrence models, seismic hazard analysis, and human-induced earthquakes.


Prerequisites: [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5)] and [(PHY136H5 and PHY137H5) or (PHY146H5 and PHY147H5)] and 1.0 credit from ERS201H5 or ERS202H5 or ERS203H5
Exclusions: JPE493H1 or PHY493H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS404H5 • Volcanology and Geothermal Systems

Volcanic eruptions are one of the most dangerous and volatile geological hazard. In the 20th Century, almost 100,000 people are believed to have been killed in volcanic eruptions, with another 4.7 million directly affected by them, but, at the end of the 20thcentury, over 500 million people lived within the hazard zone of a volcano worldwide; cities such as Tokyo, Mexico City, Naples and Seattle are besieged by the threat of nearby volcanoes. Volcanoes also provide fertile soils, near-unlimited geothermal power generation potential and are an intricate part of the Earth system. This course aims to study the mechanism through which volcanoes form, erupt and evolve, their impact on our society and the benefits they provide in the form of geothermal energy. his will be accomplished through discussion, lab and scenario based learning exercises that will take place over one weekend (approx. 16 hours).

Prerequisites: ERS203H5 and 1.0 credits from any other ERS200/300 level courses.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS411H5 • Paleobiology

This course will focus on the evolving history of organisms and their ecosystems on Earth, including aspects of geochemistry and taphonomy. This course will investigate the interactions between Earth and Life over the past 3.5 billion years, emphasizing how the paleontological record is used to understand the complex nature of our evolving Earth.

Prerequisites: 1.5 credits from (ERS201H5 or ERS202H5 or ERS203H5 or ERS211H5 or ERS225H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS412H5 • Climate Through Time

The goals of this course are to discuss the geologic record of climate change and present an overview of the methods used to reconstruct the earth's climate history and the techniques used to determine the timing of environmental changes. Topics to be addressed will include paleoclimatic reconstruction, climate and climatic variation, dating methods, and climate proxies. In addition, periods of past climate change will be highlighted with particular emphasis on climate change during the recent past. This will be put into perspective with modern day and future global change.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit from ERS201H5 or ERS202H5 or ERS203H5
Exclusions: ESS205H1 or ESS461H1 or EESB03H3 or ERS321H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS425H5 • Geology of North America

This course will provide students with a first-hand field exposure to geologic outcrops in North America, where knowledge gained during classroom instruction throughout their studies can be applied to textbook examples of a variety of real-world geologic features. The course is structured around one major field trip during the fall break where student-led group work on rock outcrops is done, followed by the provision of individual presentations and the preparation of field reports. There is a nonrefundable fee associated with this course beyond tuition. Students must register on ROSI, on a first-come first-serve and non-refundable deposit basis. The deposit must be received by the Department within one week from the first day of enrollment or the student will be dropped automatically from the course. Students should contact the Department by March of the academic year preceding the course to find out more details about the specific field trip plans.

Prerequisites: Enrolment in ERS Major or ERS Specialist or Geology Specialist Program and 1.5 credits at ERS or ESS 300 level
Exclusions: ESS420H1

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS471H5 • Research Project

Arrangements for these independent research projects must be made with an Earth Science Faculty member prior to registration. This course requires the student to submit a completed application to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration in the course is required. The application form can be downloaded from www.utm.utoronto.ca/cps/undergraduate/ resources/independent-studies-application-form. Copies of the completed report must be submitted one week prior to the end of term classes. Students may take both ERS471H5 and ERS472H5 in the same term. A component of the mark will be based on an oral presentation made at the end of the course.

Prerequisites: Any 2.0 credits from ERS or ESS(St. George Campus) at the 300-level and a minimum grade average of 75% in the last 5 courses
Exclusions: ERS470Y5 or ESS491H1 or ESS492Y1 or EESD09H3 or EESD10Y3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS472H5 • Research Project

Arrangements for these independent research projects must be made with an Earth Science Faculty member prior to registration. This course requires the student to submit a completed application to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration in the course is required. The application form can be downloaded from www.utm.utoronto.ca/cps/undergraduate/ resources/independent-studies-application-form. Copies of the completed report must be submitted one week prior to the end of term classes. Students may take both ERS471H5 and ERS472H5 in the same term. A component of the mark will be based on an oral presentation made at the end of the course.

Prerequisites: Any 2.0 credits from ERS or ESS(St. George Campus) at the 300-level and a minimum grade average of 75% in the last 5 courses
Exclusions: ERS470Y5 or ESS491H1 or ESS492Y1 or EESD09H3 or EESD10Y3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ERS499Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for a fourth or higher year students to work on the research project of a professor in Earth Science in return for 499Y5 course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, enhance their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project description for the following summer and fall/winter session on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Any 2.0 credits from the ERS300 level or ESS300(G) level and a 75% average in the last five courses taken.
Exclusions: ERS471H5 or ERS472H5 or ESS491H1 or ESS492Y1 or EESDO9H3 or EESD10Y3
Recommended Preparation: Completed program requirements for entry into fourth year level Earth Science courses.

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC100H5 • The Real CSI

This class introduces the science of Crime Scene Investigation and related forensic specialities. Students will learn about the latest scientific developments in the field, contrasting these to popular portrayals of CSI in the media, and addressing the impact of popular portrayals on juror expectations, knowledge and misconceptions. Note: This is a general first year course open to everyone. PLEASE NOTE: The required FSC Program 1st year introductory course is: FSC239Y5 Introduction to Forensic Science

Exclusions: FSC239Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC101H5 • The Real Law & Order

As a compliment to FSC100, this class transports students from the crime scene to the courtroom, to learn how forensic evidence and scientific methods hold up in court to become admissible. Students will discover the differences between approved and junk science, and see how emerging forensic sciences contribute to exonerations, addressing the impact of popular media portrayals on juror expectations, knowledge and misconceptions. Note: This is a general first year course open to everyone. PLEASE NOTE: The required FSC Program 1st year introductory course is: FSC239Y5 Introduction to Forensic Science

Prerequisites: FSC100H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC210H5 • Physical Evidence and Microscopy

Forensic Science examines physical evidence in relation to the law. There are a number of scientific techniques used to characterize physical evidence, but perhaps the most utilized technique is microscopy. In this course, students will practice how to process and characterize trace evidence using a number of different microscopy techniques, such as stereomicroscope, polarized light microscope (PLM), comparison microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and confocal microscope. The theory and operation behind each microscopy technique will be discussed during lecture, while students will have the opportunity to operate the different microscopes during laboratory sessions.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC220H5 • Introduction to Forensic Psychology

This course provides an introductory overview of the many ways psychological research and theories (i.e. behavioural science) can deliver useful information in collecting and assessing evidence for criminal investigation, trial, and prevention. Topics may include: eyewitness testimony, deception, criminal profiling, false confession, mental illness, victim trauma, criminal responsibility, risk assessment, serial killing, hate crimes, sexual offending, prejudiced policing, and jury decision-making. The aim of this course is to give students general insight into the various applied specializations of forensic psychologists.

Prerequisites: PSY100Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC239Y5 • Introduction to Forensic Science

Forensic science is the application of any scientific inquiry into criminal investigation. The results of such inquiry are ultimately for presentation in courts of law. Specialists in forensic science will lecture on a variety of topics that will include crime scene investigation, the role of the coroner, forensic pathology, forensic chemistry, forensic botany, forensic entomology, forensic anthropology, forensic dentistry, psychology and toxicology. Case studies will be reviewed, and the role of the expert witness will be examined.


Enrolment Limits: Priority given first to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors; then Minors.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L/8T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC271H5 • Ethics and Professionalism in Forensic Science

This course covers the importance of professionalism and ethical behaviour for Forensic Scientists. It looks at the role of the Forensic Scientist and the expert witness and the consequences when ethical guidelines are not followed.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5

Enrolment Limits: Priority given first to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors; then Minors.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC300H5 • Forensic Identification

Focusing on the scene of the crime and evidence found there, this course is an introduction to the field of forensic identification. Topics include: crime scene protocols, management and reconstruction; image collection, storage and enhancement; recognition collection; and chain of custody and preservation of evidence.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 and FSC271H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority given first to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC302H5 • Advanced Forensic Identification

Continuing from FSC300H5, this course focuses on advanced crime scene examination and the use of evidence detection techniques. Topics include: advanced fingerprint development techniques, footwear collection and identification, analysis report writing, bloodstain pattern interpretation and crime scene plan drawing. Additional topics discuss biometrics, examiner bias, the expert witness, crime scene examination protocols and courtroom testimony.

Prerequisites: FSC300H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority given first to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC303H5 • Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation

This course will provide students with an introduction to forensic photography, crime scene processing, and forensic identification. Topics include, but are not limited to: fingerprint identification, chance impression evidence, physical evidence, crime scene and victim photography, and proper documentation of a crime scene. Students will gain an understanding of the basic "toolkit" required for crime scene processing, and learn the fundamentals of proper collection and analysis of physical evidence. As an alternative to (FSC300H5, FSC302H5), this course satisfies the third year IDENT requirement needed for enrolment in FSC481Y5, FSC482H5, FSC483H5, and FSC485H5. Note: This course does not satisfy the IDENT requirement for FSC407H5.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 and FSC271H5
Exclusions: FSC300H5 or FSC302H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC307H5 • Missing Persons DVI and Unidentified Human Remains

The goal of this course is to gain a basic understanding of the case management involved in missing persons, disaster victim identification, and unidentified human remains cases. Topics covered will include the interdisciplinary interactions between anthropology, odontology, fingerprinting and forensic genetics in the identification and databasing of both missing persons and recovered unidentified human remains.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or BIO207H5). Priority given first to students enrolled in the Forensic Specialist Program and Forensic Science Majors.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC311H5 • Forensic Chemistry

This course focuses on the analysis of physical evidence based on the principles of analytical chemistry. Students will gain knowledge in the theory and operation of forensically relevant chemical and instrumental techniques used for the analysis of evidentiary items, including drug/alcohol analysis, gunshot residue, explosives, paint analysis, etc. Students will also develop skills relating to the interpretation, limitation, and implications of analytical results in a forensic context. (Priority given first to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors; then Minors.)

Prerequisites: CHM211H5 and (CHM110H5 and CHM120H5) or CHM140Y5
Recommended Preparation: FSC239Y5 and CHM311H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC314H5 • Current Trends in Forensic Biology

A lecture-based course examining contemporary topics in forensic biology. The course will emphasize group discussion where students will examine, review, criticize, and present on current trends and fundamental topics within forensic biology, which could include evidence screening and serology, DNA analysis methodology, forensic technological developments/enhancements as well as current ethical and/or political changes in the field. The implications and applications of forensic biology research advances will also be explored. The theme of the course is expected to be topical and current, and to vary from year to year to accommodate the interests of both the students enrolled in the course and the faculty member(s) teaching the course.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5, FSC239Y5, FSC271H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC315H5 • Forensic Biology

This course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of biological evidence in a forensic context. Students will gain knowledge in the theory and operation of forensically relevant biological and instrumental techniques used for the analysis of evidentiary items, including DNA, bodily fluids, hair, etc. Students will also develop skills relating to the interpretation, limitation, and implications of analytical results in a forensic context. (Priority given first to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors; then Minors.)

Prerequisites: BIO206H5 and BIO207H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC316H5 • Forensic Anatomy

This course examines the body as forensic evidence. Human gross anatomy and histology will be examined from the perspective of forensic pathology, students will learn about the role of the body in crime scene analysis, autopsy procedures such as fingerprinting and forensic imaging of the deceased, and address anatomical anomalies useful for forensic purposes such as identification. Other topics include bodily decomposition, disease, and injuries.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 and FSC271H5
Corequisites: FSC360H5

Enrolment Limits: Preference given to FSC Specialists and Majors.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC320H5 • Forensic Psychopathology

Pathology is the study of disease and psychopathology is the study of mental illness. In Forensic Psychopathology, then, we make inquiries about mental illness in the context of forensic practices. In this course, we will explore multiple topics in the field providing the student with a general insight into its history, scientific merits, and practical relevance. We will survey prevailing theories on mental health, illness, and treatment. Investigate psychiatric diagnoses such as (juvenile) Conduct Disorder, Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Psychopathy, hereunder their application and relevance in risk assessment, behavior prediction, and offender rehabilitation. We will also discuss methodological, ethical, and legal issues in the field, for example, the scientific validity of psychiatric diagnostics, the ethical implications of using psychiatric assessments in forensic institutions, and the legal responsibility of mentally ill offenders.

Prerequisites: FSC220H5 and FSC271H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC330H5 • Best Practices in Forensic Science

This course will guide students through the common fundamentals of quality assurance, health & safety, resiliency and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) training and report writing in forensic science professions.

Prerequisites: FSC271H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC335H5 • Forensic Epistemology and Theory

This course will explore and discuss the basic role of a forensic scientist and what it means to be scientifically informed.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 and FSC271H5

Enrolment Limits: Priorty given to FSC Specialists, Majors and then Minors.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC340H5 • Research Design

This course introduces students to common methods of research design and the nature of data collection. Students will learn how to pose a meaningful research questions, to select appropriate data types, to define variables, examine bias, confounding factors, and select appropriate statistics that address their purpose.

Prerequisites: FSC271H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC341H5 • Applied Forensic Statistics

Designed as a companion course to FSC340H5, Forensic Statistics will introduce students to basic analytic methods necessary to evaluate quantitative data in forensic science. Students will learn methods of visualizing and analyzing univariate, bivariate, and multivariate data in forensic science, with emphasis on practical applications of statistics in various forensic sub-disciplines. No prior knowledge of statistics and mathematics is required.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC350H5 • Special Topics in Forensic Science

A survey of recent developments in theory and applications of forensic science with particular attention to case studies in a particular branch of forensic science. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 or permission of instructor

Enrolment Limits: Priority given to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC351H5 • Advanced Topics in Forensic Science

A survey of recent developments in theory and applications of forensic science with particular attention to case studies in a particular branch of forensic science. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 or permission of instructor

Enrolment Limits: Priority given to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC370H5 • Forensic Psychopharmacology

This course introduces students to the area of psychopharmacology (drug induced changes in mood, thinking and behaviour). The mechanisms of action of drugs in the nervous system and their effects on the brain and on behaviour will be explored and the significance of psychopharmacology in criminal investigations and trials will be discussed.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 and FSC271H5 and BIO152H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC371H5 • The Science of Cannabis

This course introduces students to the science of cannabis. Students will learn about the constituents of cannabis, methods of analysis and the pharmacology of cannabinoids. In addition, the role of cannabis in forensic case work will be explored.

Prerequisites: FSC370H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods an opportunity to work in a research project. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. This course is aimed at facilitating International Research Opportunities offered at U of T's partner institutions and coordinated through the Centre for International Experience. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC401H5 • Forensic Pathology

This is a general introduction of the scientific and medical basis of forensic pathology. The scientific aspects of death investigation will be emphasized including cause, manner, and time of death. Emphasis will be placed in developing skills to critically examine the published forensic scientific and medical literature. Also included are human rights death investigation, and custodial death.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 and (FSC316H5 or BIO210Y5)
Recommended Preparation: FSC271H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority given first to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors; then Minors.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC402H5 • Forensic Toxicology

Forensic toxicology involves the study of the adverse effects of drugs, alcohol and poisons on biological systems in a medicolegal context. This course will include a review of pharmacokinetics, analytical techniques and quality assurance measures used in forensic toxicology, the effects of drugs on human performance and post-mortem toxicology of illicit drugs, pharmaceutical drugs and other poisons. The major focus of this course will be the role that a forensic toxicologist plays in criminal and death investigations.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 and [(CHM110H5 and CHM120H5) or CHM140Y5]
Recommended Preparation: FSC271H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority given first to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors; then Minors.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC403H5 • Forensic Analytical Toxicology

Analytical toxicology is the isolation, detection, identification, and quantitation of foreign compounds (xenobiotics) in biological and other specimens. This course integrates theoretical and practical aspects of analytical chemistry with forensic toxicology. General aspects of method development, implementation, validation, and laboratory operation will be explored.

Prerequisites: FSC239Y5 and CHM211H5
Recommended Preparation: CHM311H5 and FSC402H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/15P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC406H5 • Introduction To 3D Crime Scene Mapping And Reconstruction

This course introduces students to both standard and innovative methods of documenting, mapping, analyzing, and visualizing/reconstructing a crime scene for investigative purposes, including: total stations; laser scanners; panoramic images; and photogrammetry. Course topics range from basic measurement theory and statistics, to legal considerations such as admissibility and preparing courtroom-ready visualizations. Students will learn to use forensic mapping software to create courtroom-ready graphics.

Prerequisites: FSC300H5 or FSC303H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority given first to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors; then Minors.)
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC407H5 • Forensic Identification Field School

A field course to complement the material covered in both FSC300H, Forensic Identification & FSC302H, Advanced Forensic Identification. The field school will be held on the U of T Mississauga Campus over a 2-week period during the summer term and during weekly two hour labs in the fall term. In these classes, students will experience practical exposure to field and laboratory methods related to evidence recognition, collection and interpretation. Emphasis will be placed on the types of evidence collected, processed, and analyzed by forensic identification specialists. General evidence and small object photography techniques will be an important component of the course.

Prerequisites: [FSC239Y5 and (FSC300H5 and FSC302H5)] or Permission of Instructor

Enrolment Limits: Priority given to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors. Limited Enrolment and Course Application required. Application Process see: https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/forensic/applications
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 104P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC415H5 • Advanced Methods in Forensic Biology

This advanced course explores the methodologies and data interpretation of forensic DNA typing, and other forensic biology techniques. The course will cover the principles, protocols, and current practices in an effort to understand the “what”, “how” and “why” of DNA analysis in a forensic context. Students will also learn about new and future trends in the field of forensic DNA typing, where discussion and evaluation of the primary literature is a key component of this course. Practical sessions will focus on the advanced techniques discussed in lecture.

Prerequisites: FSC315H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC416H5 • Population Genetics

This course introduces students to the genetic variation between and within populations. The topics include evolutionary forces, quantitative genetics, and Baysian statistics as it applies to forensic biology.

Prerequisites: (ANT202H5 or BIO207H5) and BIO259H5
Exclusions: EEB459H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC430H5 • Seminar in Forensic Science

As a capstone course, FSC430H5 is intended to apply the unique interdisciplinary perspectives acquired by students enrolled in the Forensic Science Minor. This course will address key themes in forensics, and culminate in a collaborative course project, informed and shaped by these perspectives. Students can expect to work in partnerships, groups, or teams to investigate and discuss major issues, hot topics, historical events or growing bodies of knowledge that contribute to a broader understanding of forensic science and how it is relevant across many, if not all disciplines. Restricted to students enrolled in the Forensic Science Minor.

Prerequisites: FSC360H5

Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students enrolled in the Forensic Science Minor.
Distribution Requirement: Science, Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC439H5 • Forensic Anthropology Case Analysis

This course offers a case-based approach to forensic anthropology. Students will critically evaluate real forensic anthropological cases, in addition to completing their own mock cases - from the transfer of evidence to a mock trial.

Prerequisites: ANT439H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to Forensic Anthropology Specialists
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC481Y5 • Internship in Forensic Science

As the capstone experience for the Forensic Science Specialist Programs, this course provides students with professional practice and research experience. Students are required to attend classes that address proper research design and methodology, as well as issues of professional practice in the forensic sciences including: ethics; research protocols; written and verbal communication skills; professional communication (interviews, letters, emails, reports, presentations, and publications); and expert witness testimony. Students will also be placed with a participating forensic agency to conduct research and gain an understanding of the unit's daily operations. In addition to practice presentations, critiques, an ethics approval application, a 10-15 page research proposal, and a mock interview, students are required to formally present the results of their research at the annual Forensic Science Day symposium and submit a publication quality manuscript of their work. Note: Internship Placements are arranged by the FSC Program. Students MUST apply for this course and the Course Application is due in the February preceding the placement. Course Application, Information & Procedures: https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/forensic/applications There will be an information session regarding Internship Placements, preceding the application period. Students must have one free day (Monday - Friday) to work at their internship placement site and must be in the final year before graduation. Students are expected to provide their own transportation to placement work site.

Prerequisites: Enrolment in a Forensic Science Specialist Program and completion of the forensic program statistics course(s) requirement and any third-level IDENT course, and permission of instructor.
Exclusions: FSC482H5 or FSC483H5 or FSC485H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC482H5 • Professional Practice in Forensic Science

This course will address practical considerations of professional practice, including professional writing, ethics in research, interviews, mock trial, and journal publication. Students MUST apply for this course. Course Application & Procedures: https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/forensic/applications

Prerequisites: Enrolment in a Forensic Science Specialist Program and completion of the forensic program statistics course(s) requirement and any third level IDENT course and permission of instructor.
Corequisites: FSC483H5 or FSC485H5
Exclusions: FSC481Y5

Enrolment Limits: Restricted to Forensic Science Specialists.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC483H5 • Collaborative Research Internship

As the alternative capstone experience, this course provides students the opportunity to work in a cross-disciplinary collaborative environment to address case-based research questions. Note: Topics will be made available at the time of application. Students MUST apply for this course and the course application is due in the February preceding the internship. Course Application & Procedures: https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/forensic/applications There will be an information session regarding this course, preceding the application period. Students must have one free day (Monday - Friday) to work on their collaborative research internship and must be in the final year before graduation.

Prerequisites: Enrolment in a Forensic Science Specialist Program and completion of the forensic program statistics course(s) requirement and any third-level IDENT course and permission of instructor.
Corequisites: FSC482H5
Exclusions: FSC481Y5 or FSC489Y5 or FSC485H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC485H5 • Professional Opportunity in Forensic Science

This course provides students with the opportunity to engage in, and reflect on, a professional forensic experience that contributes to their employment eligibility after graduation. They will develop networking skills, enhance professional competencies, and are given the opportunity to locate and select their own experience relevant to their career goals, which may include (but is not limited to) a possible: work-study position, conference workshop, professional certification, field school, paid or unpaid internship or agency co-op. All opportunities must be approved by the program director in the term prior to enrolment.

Prerequisites: Completion of the forensic program statistics course(s) requirement and any third-level IDENT course and permission of instructor.
Corequisites: FSC482H5
Exclusions: FSC483H5 or FSC481Y5

Enrolment Limits: Restricted to Forensic Science Specialists. Course Application required.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FSC489H5 • Advanced Independent Project

For students wishing to complete original research, a feasibility study, critical review of the literature or position paper leading towards a publishable report.

Prerequisites: Permission of Program Director.
Recommended Preparation: (Restricted to Forensic Science Specialists and Majors.)

Distribution Requirement: Social Science, Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR112H5 • Physical Geography

This physical geography course provides a broad introduction to the Earth System, involving the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere and their interactions, at local to planetary spatial scales. It examines natural and anthropogenic origins of environmental change. Key methods and techniques used by physical geographers to study the Earth System are covered in lectures, readings, practical sessions and field work. Fieldwork is integral to all sub-disciplines of geography, and a major component of this course. There is no substitute for direct, hands-on exploration of the natural world. This course fulfills 1 field day.

Exclusions: GGR117Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR201H5 • Introduction to Geomorphology

This course provides an introduction to the principles and concepts of geomorphology, the study of the processes that shape the surface of the earth. The course adopts a process-oriented approach to the study of the variety of landforms found in the natural environment. Topics are mainly taken from a Canadian perspective and include energy flows through the land, weathering and erosion (fluvial, coastal, chemical, aeolian, and glacial), hillslope materials, drainage basin morphology, periglacial environments, and human modification of the landscape.

Prerequisites: GGR112H5 or ENV100Y5
Exclusions: GGR201H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR214H5 • Global Weather and Climate

The climates of the globe are created from the kinds of weather systems which usually occur. This course surveys the weather systems of the globe and the geography which helps to transform them into regional climates. It uses just enough physics to show you how it all works and how we can make informed assessments about ideas on climatic change.

Prerequisites: 4.0 credits including GGR112H5 or ENV100Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR217H5 • Fundamentals of Hydrology

Hydrology is the study of the quantity, quality, storage, and transfer of the world's freshwater. The presence of water on and in the continents and atmosphere sustains the terrestrial biosphere, including human life. This course focuses on the central concepts of hydrology by taking a systems approach to the movement and storage of water on and in a watershed. Based on the framework of the water cycle, the course emphasizes the physical processes that control the stores and transfers of water and energy in the Earth system. This course serves as a gateway to the more advanced treatment of hydrology in upper levels, as well as providing a solid understanding of the fundamentals of the science of water for students in other streams of physical geography, environmental science, earth science, and biology.

Prerequisites: 4.0 credits including GGR112H5 or ENV100Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR227H5 • Ecosystems and Environmental Change

This course introduces the rapidly advancing fields of ecosystem science through the exploration of how ecosystems respond to climate change, pollution, and intensive natural resource management. The impacts from anthropogenic stressors on ecosystem functioning are often complex, with interactions occurring among plants, microorganisms, and physical and chemical environments. Lecture topics and case studies focus primarily on important representative Canadian ecosystems that also play vital roles in the resource sector including forests, agricultural land, wetlands and aquatic ecosystems.

Prerequisites: 4.0 credits including GGR112H5 or ENV100Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR276H5 • Spatial Data Science I

Introduction to the study of geographical phenomena using descriptive and inferential statistics. Fundamentals of geographic data and statistical problem solving using non-spatial and spatial descriptive statistics. Decision making using evidence gathered from inferential statistical analysis. Graphical summary, geographic visualization and mapping of analytical results. Application of state of the art software for statistical analysis. Provides background for future studies in geographic information systems and advanced statistical analysis. The course strikes a balance between developing an understanding of core non-spatial and spatial statistical concepts, while demonstrating technical proficiency in the application of software to the study of geographical questions.

Prerequisites: 4.0 credits
Exclusions: GGR270H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR278H5 • Geographical Information Systems

Introduction to models of representation and management of geographical data for scientific analysis. Basic quantitative methods and techniques for geographic data analysis, including collection, manipulation, description and interpretation. Practical exercises using GIS and statistical software packages with examples drawn from both physical and human geography.

Prerequisites: 4.0 credits

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR304H5 • Dendrochronology

Tree rings are a powerful natural archive for addressing research questions across a range of spatial and temporal scales, owing to the fact that they are annually resolved, long-lived (e.g., multi-century) and cover a large portion of the Earth's surface. Tree-rings reflect changes in their local environment, and they are sensitive to factors that limit biological processes such as light, soil moisture, temperature and disturbance. Environment changes are 'encoded' in the physical properties of tree-rings (e.g., ring-width, wood density or isotopes). This course will provide students with the theoretical background and technical skills needed to cross-date, measure, analyse and interpret tree-ring data, and use this information to address practical research questions.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits including [GGR276H5 and (GGR214H5 or GGR227H5) or permission of instructor]

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR305H5 • Biogeography

Analysis of past and present plant and animal distributions, and of the environmental and biological constraints involved. The course emphasizes the impact of continental drift, Quaternary climatic changes and human interference on contemporary patterns.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits
Exclusions: GGR305H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR307H5 • Environmental Soil Science

Soils play critical roles in sustaining life. They support plants and agriculture, serve as home to a plethora of organisms, recycle organic matter and nutrients, provide materials for construction, art, and medicine, preserve paleoecological and archaeological records, regulate global climate through the exchange of greenhouse gasses, and filter contaminants in water and waste. This course introduces fundamentals of soil formation, physical, chemical and biological characteristics, and classification schemes. It explores the role of, and how humans interact with, soils in Canadian forests, wetlands, agricultural systems, and industrial and urban settings. Aspects of carbon, nutrient, and pollutant biogeochemistry in soils are explored in detail. This course fulfills 2 field days.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR309H5 • Wetland Ecosystems

Wetlands are an integral part of our biosphere, playing fundamental roles in the modification of water quality, biodiversity, and the global carbon cycle. This course focuses on the classification, hydrology, biogeochemistry, and ecology of wetland systems. The latter part of the course builds on this physical foundation by introducing management issues associated with wetland preservation, restoration and creation. This course fulfills 4 field days.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR311H5 • Landscape Biogeography

A geographical, multi-scale perspective on the relationship between the physical landscape and the distribution, movement, dispersal, and abundance of select animal species. Landscape measures including (but not limited to) fragmentation indices, habitat metrics, and estimates of animal movement will be considered. Emphasis is placed on understanding the biology of the species being studied, the physical structure of the landscape, and the intricacies of various modeling software. Students should expect to develop a well-rounded set of skills in analyzing animal movement, and producing relevant and usable results towards the management of varied landscapes and the conservation of species.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR315H5 • Physical Hydrology

This course centres on the advanced treatment of the physical principles involved in the occurrence and movement of water on and beneath the Earth's surface. Watershed-scale hydrologic systems are investigated, along with basic principles of fluid mechanics. Open channel hydraulics, soil water, and groundwater processes are investigated. The importance of understanding water movement in the environment by exploring the relationship of hydrology to other environmental sciences is stressed. This course fulfills 2 field days.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits including GGR214H5 or GGR217H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR316H5 • Landforms

Systems approach to hillslope geomorphology studies; processes of erosion and deposition; mass wasting; slope forms of humid and arid regions; process-response models; applied aspects.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits including GGR201H5 or Permission of Instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR317H5 • The Cryosphere: Canada's Frozen Environments

Snow and ice dominate the Canadian landscape. There is virtually no area in Canada that escapes the influence of snow and ice. We skate on frozen ponds, ski down snow covered mountains, drive through snow blizzards and watch how ice jams in rivers cause rivers to swell and floods to occur. The duration and the thickness of snow and ice increase rapidly northwards, and glaciers are found in mountainous areas and in large parts of the Arctic region. Given that snow and ice impact heavily on the Canadian way of life, this course seeks to understand the dynamics of snow and ice in a hydrological context. This course will examine snow properties, snow cover distribution, glacier hydrology, melt runoff, and ice in its many forms (lake ice, river ice, sea ice, and ground ice). This course will also examine some of the recent observed changes occurring in the cryosphere regions of Canada. This course includes an off campus field trip. This course fulfills 2 field days.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits including GGR214H5 or GGR217H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR321H5 • Geographic Information Processing

Problem solving using geographic information systems (GIS). Essential distributed computing aspects of GIS are presented. Among topics covered are the use of logic in spatial analysis, line-of-sight analysis, route selection, site selection, and landscape analysis. Hands-on assignments are emphasized.

Prerequisites: 8.5 credits and GGR278H5
Recommended Preparation: GGR276H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR322H5 • GIS and Population Health

The purpose of this course will be to develop an appreciation for the conceptual and methodological intersections that exist between geographical information systems and population health. While population health can include incidence and prevalence of disease and ill-health, as well as concerns about service provision, this course will focus mainly on disease, injury, illness more broadly. The course will include both lectures, where foundational concepts will be introduced and related to practical lab sessions, where students will gain experience using GIS to map and study health information. Topics will include: spatial databases for population health, mapping health data, analyzing the spatial clustering of disease and/or injury, mapping and analyzing environmental and social risk factors.

Prerequisites: (8.5 credits and GGR278H5) or permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: GGR276H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science, Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR335H5 • Remote Sensing Applications

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the various ways in which remote sensing images have been used for environmental applications among the sectors of government, industry, and academia. A part of the course will be devoted to application projects employing remote sensing and spatial data analysis in natural resources and environmental assessments.


Prerequisites: 8.5 credits and (GGR276H5 or GGR278H5 or GGR337H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR337H5 • Environmental Remote Sensing

This introductory course emphasizes mastering fundamental remote sensing concepts and utilizing remotely sensed data for monitoring land resources and environmental change. Topics include surface-energy interactions, sensor systems, image interpretation, and applications for examining soil, vegetation and water resources. Upon completion of this course, students should have the necessary knowledge and skills to pursue more advanced work in digital image processing and remote sensing applications.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits
Exclusions: GGR337H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR338H5 • Environmental Modeling

An application of environmental models to contemporary problems of decision-making. The course demonstrates the relevance of techniques of data management (statistics, computer systems) to issues facing Canada and the global community. 

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits including GGR276H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR372H5 • Geographical Analysis of Land Resources

This course focuses on the nature of land resources information and its analysis. Emphasis is on use of geographic information systems to model and analyze a variety of land resources. Topics such as terrain analysis and interpolation will be covered.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits including GGR278H5 or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR374H5 • Water Quality and Stream Ecosystems

Flowing water courses (streams and rivers) are unique ecosystems from lake, terrestrial, and wetland environments, and are integral in regulation of land-borne solutes to larger water bodies. This course provides a holistic treatment of the stream ecosystem, with particular emphasis on nutrient and contaminant transformation, in-stream hydraulics and morphology, the hyporheic, parafluvial, and riparian zones, as well as hillslope hydrological processes responsible for transfer of water to the stream. Variability in stream biota, community interactions, and ecosystem-level processes are also discussed. Weekly field and lab exercises provide the student with hands-on experience with the lecture material. This course fulfills 4 field days.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits including GGR217H5 or GGR227H5 or BIO205H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR375H5 • Physical Environment of the City

The physical structure of the city results in a distinctive local climate that is linked to air and water quality, as well as to energy use. A geographical information system is used to assemble physical information from which to model the urban climatic environment, taking the example of Mississauga. Particular emphasis is placed upon the role of field measurements and satellite data as sources of geographical information.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits
Recommended Preparation: GGR214H5 or GGR217H5 or GGR272H5, GGR276H5 or GGR278H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR376H5 • Spatial Data Science II

This course builds on quantitative methods introduced in GGR276, and aims to provide a broad study of advanced statistical methods and their use in a spatial context in physical, social, and environmental sciences. The course covers theories, methods, and applications geared towards helping students develop an understanding of the important theoretical concepts in spatial data analysis, and gain practical experience in application of spatial statistics to a variety of physical, social and environmental problems using advanced statistical software.

Prerequisites: (9.0 credits including GGR276H5 or STA256H5) or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR377H5 • Global Climate Change

The main focus of this course is upon the climatic aspects of environmental change which affect Great Lakes water levels, disappearing glaciers, sea level rise, desertification and dwindling water resources in an ever more populous world. These changes to the earth surface environment are explored in the context of themes and issues which were introduced in first year, with a view to answering an important question: whether policy action on climate change must wait for more science, or whether action is merely delayed by failure to appreciate science.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits including GGR112H5 or ENV100Y5
Exclusions: ENV377H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR379H5 • Field Methods in Physical Geography

This course is structured around one major field trip that will occur before fall-term courses begin, preparatory work, and approximately bi-weekly course meetings during the regular academic term to complete complementary work in computer and/or wet laboratories. Field projects will involve analyses and mapping of vegetation, soils, aquatic systems, hydrology, and/or geomorphology, and subsequent data analysis. Students will be required to write one major research paper and present projects to the class. Each student is required to pay the costs of his/her transportation and accommodation. Students must register on ACORN, on a first-come first-serve and non-refundable deposit basis. The deposit must be received by the Department within one week from the first day of enrollment or the student will be dropped automatically from the course. Students should contact the Department to find out more details about the specific fieldtrip plans. This course fulfills 7 field days.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credits from: (GGR201H5 or GGR214H5 or GGR217H5 or GGR227H5) and 1.0 credits from any other GGR/ENV SCi course(s) and 2.0 credits from any science courses and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR381H5 • Spatial Database

Students will gain basic knowledge of spatial database design, implementation, query, and sharing. Playing with real-world datasets, students will create, edit, and manage geospatial databases using a variety of commercial and open-source software such as ArcGIS and PostgreSQL.

Prerequisites: GGR278H5 or CSC263H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR382H5 • Digital Mapping and Principles of Cartography

This course will cover foundational concepts in mapmaking (cartography) using geographical information systems (GIS). The course will also explore map rendering in the digital and mobile worlds where the power of geography and cartography are leveraged through development of location based services used increasingly in everyday life. Topics covered will include but are not limited to: coordinate systems and map projections, measurement and classification, making maps using GIS, critical appraisal of mapped information. The course will combine lectures with practical sessions where foundational concepts will be applied using GIS and related technologies and software.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits including GGR278H5
Exclusions: GGR272H5
Recommended Preparation: GGR276H5 and STA256H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science, Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR383H5 • Contaminants in the Environment

This course discusses various types of contaminants (metal, organic pollutants, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, flame-retardants, micro-plastics, nano-materials) and their impact on the environment. Lectures will cover sources, transport and fate of these contaminants in various environmental media (air, water), degradation mechanisms, uptake into biological systems, and toxicity. Case studies such as pollutants in Arctic ecosystems and the potential risks they pose to the health of indigenous people will be examined. Tutorial discussions of current scientific articles will complement lectures.

Prerequisites: [8.0 credits and (1.0 credit from GGR201H5 or GGR214H5 or GGR217H5 or GGR227H5)] or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR384H5 • Climatology of Canadian Landscapes

This course will focus on the natural surface climates of Canada. Topics covered will include Alpine and forest environments; ocean and wetland regions; and both artic and subarctic climates. Surface energy processes will be examined, and how the behavior of energy exchange varies by climate region. This course fulfills 4 field days.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits including GGR214H5 or GGR217H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR404H5 • Paleoenvironmental Change

Knowledge of paleo (past) climate and environmental change is crucial to understanding Earth System dynamics and predicting future change. Students will be exposed to a spectrum of traditional and frontier methods employed in past global change research, with a focus on the Cenozoic Era (~66 million years). This course will examine varied topics such as sea level rise; climate change over geologic and societal time; the Anthropocene, onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciations; and radiometric dating. More broadly, this course aims to provide students with an understanding of how paleoenvironmental studies contribute to advancing knowledge of the Earth System.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits including 0.5 credit from: GGR214H5 or GGR304H5 or GGR305H5 or GGR384H5 or ERS321H5 or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR406H5 • Environmental Biogeochemistry

Environmental biogeochemistry provides an introduction to the biological, chemical, and geological processes that regulate the flow of energy and matter in the environment. This seminar course explores the processes underlying biogeochemical cycles of major elements such as carbon and nutrients, and examines how these key cycles have been altered during the Anthropocene, an era of unprecedented human-induced environmental and climate change. Topics covered include biogeochemical processes in atmospheric, ocean, freshwater and terrestrial compartments; emerging techniques (eg., stable-isotopes and paleo-proxies) used in biogeochemistry; and how disruptions to biogeochemical processes are at the root of many environmental issues such as eutrophication, climate change, ozone depletion, ocean acidification and toxic metal contamination.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR407H5 • Ecohydrology

Ecohydrology explores the feedback between biological, hydro-logical and biogeochemical processes that help shape ecosystem form and function. These feedbacks are central to the regulation of the global climate and water resources. With pronounced and rapid human modification to the landscape and climate system this field of study is increasingly relevant to formulate mitigation strategies. This seminar and research course explores the feedback processes most crucial to climate change and water resources. Topics include ecosystem control on the water balance, the role of peat-lands in ameliorating climate change, hydro-logic controls on species diversity, and the role of the watershed in mitigating human pollutants. Students are expected to conduct independent and collaborative study.

Prerequisites: GGR315H5 or a combination of GGR217H5 plus one of (GGR305H5 or GGR307H5 or GGR309H5 or GGR374H5 or BIO311H5 or BIO330H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR437H5 • Cloud-based Image Analysis

This course builds on the fundamental remote sensing concepts, techniques, and applications introduced in GGR337H5, and aims to provide an advanced study of digital image processing and remote sensing applications. In specific, this course will use a cloud-based platform for large-scale analysis of satellite imagery, including mapping ground features, detecting changes, and identifying trends on the Earth's surface.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits including GGR337H5 or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR440H5 • Drone Remote Sensing

Industries from agriculture through to defense and mining are investing in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) technology to support operational and strategic objectives. This course will cover the adoption of UAV technologies as a remote sensing tool and the impact of logistical, regulatory, and technical hurdles on UAV technology now and in the future. Through the course, students will gain the knowledge requirements to operate a UAV following Transport Canada guidelines and develop skills in processing UAV imagery into information assets that support applications where high resolution, spatial accuracy, and high detail is required.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits including GGR337H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR442H5 • GIS Capstone Project

Students apply prerequisite knowledge and techniques to real-world GIS projects requested by external clients. Through background research, proposal, data management, and implementation, students develop GIS professional competencies, which will be demonstrated through collaboration, presentations and reports.

Prerequisites: [12.0 credits and GGR276H5 and GGR278H5 and (1.0 credit from GGR321H5 or GGR335H5 or GGR337H5 or GGR376H5 or GGR382H5 or GGR463H5) and (1.0 credit from GGR311H5 or GGR370H5 or GGR372H5 or GGR384H5 or GGR437H5 or GGR440H5)] or permission of instructor.

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR444H5 • Space Time Data Analysis

This course is designed for senior undergraduate students in a workshop format with a specific focus on application. Topics include space-time data collection, processing, analysis, and visualization. Widely used space-time analysis tools and newly developed data mining techniques will be introduced and discussed with examples and hands-on practices in the class. With practical experience on real-world space-time datasets, students will learn the basic knowledge and various tools for analyzing spatiotemporal datasets. The course encompasses practical instruction and training in ArcGIS Pro to use multiple public available space-time datasets. The primary outcome for students taking this course will be an independent analysis of a substantial space-time dataset, a formal report of the analysis, and a professional oral presentation.

Prerequisites: 13.5 credits and GGR321H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR463H5 • Geographic Information Analysis and Processing

This course focuses on the digital representation and analysis of geospatial phenomena using open source software. Class discussions cover the foundational methods, algorithms, and scripting languages used in GIS analysis, which are reinforced in lab using current, widely used open source software. The course is structured as a series of modules that culminate in a final project. Students are encouraged to incorporate individual areas of interest into class discussion and assignments. Successful students will broaden their GIS toolset, increasing the flexibility of their work.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits including GGR321H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR479H5 • Special Topics in Physical Geography

An advanced seminar dealing with topics in physical geography, to be selected according to staff and student interests. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR484H5 • The Climate of the Arctic

High latitude environments are becoming the focus of increasing scientific attention because of their role in global environmental change. The implications of changes occurring to the sea ice and snowcover are far reaching and can have impacts on physical, biological and human systems both within and beyond the region. This course will provide a comprehensive examination of climates of high latitudes. Topics that will be covered include the Arctic energy budget and atmospheric circulation, the hydrologic cycle in the Arctic, the ocean-sea ice-climate interactions and feedbacks, modeling the Arctic climate system as well as an evaluation of recent climate variability and trends.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits including GGR214H5 or GGR317H5 or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR494H5 • Special Topics in GIS

(Formerly GGR394H5) Studies of selected topics in Geographic Information Systems not covered in regular courses. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L,S,T,P) from year to year, but will be between 24-36 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

GGR498H5 • Physical Geography Independent Research Project

This independent project course is designed to give students experience in the definition and execution of a one-term research study on a physical geography topic, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Students who wish to pursue this option with a specific faculty member or who have an idea for a research project should approach the faculty member early - before the start of the academic term - to negotiate the terms of the project.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC200H5 • Imaging Technologies for Scientific Visual Communication

Introduction to image and media technologies central to modern digital communication, with emphasis on their use in science communication and education. Topics include the appropriate use of visual media, design strategies, design for legibility and scientific image conventions. Tutorial sessions will introduce vector and bitmap image creation and manipulation tools.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5
Exclusions: HSC302H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC300H5 • Written Communication for Health Care

This course presents the principles of communicating effective audience-specific health information in both print and electronic media. Students will learn to analyze the form, content, language, and imagery of written health communication; to locate the published research behind health reports in the popular media; and to communicate clear, accurate health information to medical professionals, general audiences, and readers with low literacy skills.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC301H5 • Data and Information Visualization

This course presents the principles of information design: the clear, concise and truthful presentation of data in static and interactive graphics. Visualization is used to explore data, reveal patterns, and to communicate to different audiences. Topics range from human visual perception and cognition, to the critical interpretation of design and accuracy in information graphics. Practical application of course material will require students to develop information graphics for peer review and critique.

Prerequisites: HSC200H5
Exclusions: CCT470H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC302H5 • Biocommunication Visualization

This course covers analysis and development of visual media for medical or scientific topics. Lectures include: light/form; proportion/scale; scientific visual conventions; media appropriate for target audience and reproduction. Topics may include: physiology, anatomical/biological subjects, patient education or health promotion. Classes consist of lectures with computer lab explorations.

Prerequisites: HSC200H5
Exclusions: HMB304H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC307H5 • Visual Presentation Design for Life Sciences

This course teaches students basic graphic and multimedia design theory, and skills required to create effective scientific posters and oral-visual presentations. Topics include the communication objectives of different presentation types; human visual perception and design; and theories of multimedia learning. Students will create media using evidence-based design principles.

Prerequisites: BIO152H5 and BIO153H5 and HSC200H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 18L/18P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC401H5 • Health and Science Communication Design

This course presents the principles of health and science communication and examines the characteristics of effective audience-specific media design. Included are issues of learning context, target audience analysis, and effective information design in the development of tools that communicate concepts to the general public. Students will analyze existing media, conduct an information needs assessment, and design an *interactive learning tool* on a current health or science-related topic. 

Prerequisites: HSC200H5 and one of the following courses: HSC300H5 or HSC301H5 or HSC302H5 or HSC307H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/12P/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC402H5 • Digital Learning Environments in Biology and Health Science

This course focuses on the design, development and evaluation of digital learning environments for biology and health sciences education. An overview of learning management systems, knowledge object design, collaborative knowledge building environments, simulations, tutorials, and games will be presented. Emerging communications technologies will be discussed in theory, explored through examples, and applied through prototype design. 

Prerequisites: HSC200H5 and one of the following courses: HSC300H5 or HSC301H5 or HSC302H5 or HSC307H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC403H5 • Visualization of Forensic Demonstrative Evidence

This course examines the visual representation of forensic demonstrative evidence in Canadian courtrooms. A case-based approach simulates professional practice. Forensic anthropology, biology and visual communication theory are explored in new media for presentation. Visual problem solving skills are developed through collaboration. In class, presentations and practica are combined with critical analysis of visualizations.

Prerequisites: 10.0 credits, including ANT205H5 or ANT306H5 or (BIO208H5 and BIO209H5) or BIO210Y5 or FSC239Y5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC404H5 • Advanced Visual Media for Anthropological Data

This course examines the visual representation of physical evidence in archaeology, and physical/biological anthropology. Photography, traditional illustration, and digital rendering are used to produce scientific graphics in support of published research. Through practical and analytical exercises students will gain an understanding of the media and techniques used to visually represent data.

Prerequisites: (HSC200H5 and one of the following courses: HSC300H5 or HSC301H5 or HSC302H5 or HSC307H5) or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC405H5 • Digital Forensic Facial Reconstruction

This course examines the technical, anatomical, and sociological considerations involved in the three-dimensional digital forensic facial reconstruction. Human facial anatomy, traditional reconstruction techniques, and the use of 3D animation software are the core areas of study. Using this knowledge, students reconstruct the facial identity of an individual known only from cranial skeletal remains.

Prerequisites: (HSC200H5 and one of the following courses: HSC300H5 or HSC301H5 or HSC302H5 or HSC307H5) or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

HSC406H5 • Advanced Written Communication for Health Care

This course builds on skills developed in HSC300H. Topics include: communication of epidemiological data and of best evidence in medical and health science research. Students learn to think critically about health and science research, interpret complex or contentious evidence from the medical literature, and produce in-depth health information documents in a range of formats.

Prerequisites: HSC300H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JBC472H5 • Seminars in Biotechnology

An introduction to current research in biochemistry and biotechnology, through seminars and literature reviews, presented by invited speakers and students. Subject areas include biotechnology, biomaterials, enzyme engineering, biosensors, drug delivery, spectrometry, separations chemistry, and bioinformatics.

Prerequisites: BIO372H5 and CHM361H5 and (CHM362H5 or BIO315H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JBH471H5 • Worlds Colliding: The History and Ecology of Exploration, Contact, and Exchange

An examination of contact in world history through both an ecological and a historical lens. Precise topics will depend on the year, but the focus will be on the creation of global systems and ecological challenges that continue to shape our world. In some years, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process. Students interested in this course will need to be approved for enrollment by the department and course instructors.

Prerequisites: 2.0 HIS credits or 1.0 BIO credit at the 300 level and permission of instructor.
Exclusions: UTM290H5 Winter 2018 or Winter 2019

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Humanities, Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JCB487Y5 • Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory

Students will work together as members of a multidisciplinary team toward the completion of an interdisciplinary experimental or theoretical research project. Teams will be comprised of at least three students, with representation from at least three areas of specialization, namely, astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth sciences or physics. The interdisciplinary projects will be based on current trends in research and student teams will work to complete their projects with guidance provided by a team of faculty advisors from the Biology Department and the Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences. In addition to the rigorous development of research skills, the course will also provide students with training and practical experience in project management techniques and teamwork skills development. JCB487Y5 requires submitting an application to the department before the end of June for Fall enrolment. Application forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Application should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration on ACORN is also required.

Prerequisites: (2.0 credits at the 300 level from BIO or CHM or JBC or JCP or ERS or ESS(G) or PHY) and (1.0 credit from BIO206H5 or BIO314H5 or CHM372H5 or CHM373H5 or CHM394H5 or CHM395H5 or CHM396H5 or CHM397H5 or ERS201H5 or ERS202H5 or PHY324H5 or PHY347H5). Normally taken in 4th year. Students must obtain approval from the faculty member(s) who will serve as the supervisor(s) in advance of the start of the course.
Exclusions: BIO400Y5 or BIO481Y5 or CBJ481Y5 or CHM489Y5 or ERS470Y5 or ERS471H5 or ERS472H5 or PHY489Y5 or BCH472Y1 or BCH473Y1 or CHM499Y1 or CSB497H1 or CSB498Y1 or CSB499Y1 or ESS491H1 or ESS492Y1 or MGY480Y1 or PHY478H1 or PHY479Y1 or BIOD98Y3 or CHMD90Y3 or CHMD91H3 or ESSD09H3 or ESSD10H3 or PSCD10H3

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 240P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JCP221H5 • Thermodynamics

An introduction to equilibrium thermodynamics with application to ideal and non-ideal systems: covering the concepts of work and heat, the laws of thermodynamics, internal energy, enthalpy and entropy, the chemical potential, states of matter, phase rules and phase diagrams, and chemical equilibria. Kinetics topics include rate laws, both differential and integrated, rate constants, activated complex theory, and temperature effects.

Prerequisites: [(CHM110H5 and CHM120H5 with a minimum grade of 60% in CHM120H5) or (PHY136H5 and PHY137H5) or (PHY146H5 and PHY147H5 )] and [(MAT132H5 and MAT134H5) or (MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT157H5 and MAT159H5) or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5]
Exclusions: CHM220H1 or CHM221H1 or CHM225Y1 or CHMB20H3 or CHMB23H3
Recommended Preparation: MAT212H5 or MAT223H5 or MAT232H5 or MAT233H5 or MAT236H5 or MAT240H5 or MAT242H5 or MAT244H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JCP265H5 • Introduction to Scientific Computing

This course is an introduction to computing in the physical sciences. Students will gain experience utilizing numerical software tools used in both academic and industrial settings. A variety of numerical techniques will be covered, with topics to include: curve fitting, numerical approximations of derivatives and integrals, root finding, solutions of differential equations, Fourier series, Monte Carlo methods, and more. Students will also acquire skills in data analysis and visualization. No prior experience in computer programming is required.

Prerequisites: [PHY146H5 or PHY136H5 (minimum grade of 80%)] and [PHY147H5 or PHY137H5 (minimum grade of 80%)] and [(MAT135H5 and MAT136H5) or (MAT137H5 and MAT139H5) or (MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5)]
Exclusions: CSC108H5 or CSC108H1 or CSC120H1 or CSC148H1 or CSCA08H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JCP321H5 • Quantum Mechanics I: Foundations

A first course covering basic concepts of quantum chemistry and physics. Topics include: de Broglie waves and wave-particle duality, the postulates of quantum mechanics, the Schrödinger equation, the square potential well and potential barriers, the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor, atoms, molecules and solids.

Prerequisites: (PHY136H5 and PHY137H5) or (PHY146H5 and PHY147H5) and (JCP221H5 or PHY245H5) and (MAT212H5 or MAT223H5 or MAT232H5 or MAT242H5 or MAT244H5)
Exclusions: CHM326Y1 or PHY256H1 or PHY356H1 or PHYB56H3 or PHYC56H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JCP322H5 • Statistical Mechanics

Statistical methods for bridging the quantum behaviour of atoms and molecules to their macroscopic properties in solid, liquid and gaseous states. The course introduces partition functions, canonical ensembles, and their application to thermodynamic properties such as entropy, heat capacity, equilibrium constants, reaction rates, and Bose-Einstein/Fermi-Dirac distribution functions.

Prerequisites: JCP321H5
Exclusions: CHM328H1 or CHMC20H3 or PHY452H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JCP410H5 • Modelling of Biochemical Systems

An introduction to mathematical modelling of complex biological systems, with a focus on biochemical kinetic models, their numerical simulation, and methods for analytically and computationally studying their behaviour. This is a one-term independent-study project course: students will be given a set of directed readings, then assisted in selecting an existing model from the literature. After reproducing existing results, students will be tasked with extending the model in a direction of their own choosing; this can include exploring different parameter regimes, incorporating new or different aspects of the underlying biology, or applying different analytical techniques. Students will work with the instructor to select a suitable project, matching their background and interests. Formal lectures will be replaced with a series of weekly meetings with the instructor to discuss progress and plans.

Prerequisites: (JCP221H5 or PHY241H5) and PHY245H5 and (MAT212H5 or MAT223H5 or MAT232H5 or MAT242H5 or MAT244H5)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

JCP421H5 • Quantum Mechanics II: Applications

The course offers an in-depth examination of the fundamental principles of quantum theory and a guide to its applications. Topics may vary but will include: time-independent Schrodinger equation, quantum dynamics in Heisenberg and Schrodinger pictures, time-independent perturbation theory, WKB approximation, variational method, spin, addition of angular momentum, time-dependent perturbation theory, scattering.

Prerequisites: JCP321H5 and PHY325H5
Exclusions: PHYC563H3 or PHY456H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JCP422H5 • NMR Spectroscopy

Fundamentals of NMR spectroscopy including classical and quantum descriptions, NMR parameters and relaxation times, product operators, multi-dimensional NMR, and solid-state techniques.

Prerequisites: (JCP221H5 or PHY241H5) and PHY245H5 and (MAT212H5 or MAT223H5 or MAT232H5 or MAT242H5 or MAT244H5)
Recommended Preparation: JCP321H5 and CHM361H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JCP463H5 • Techniques in Structural Biology

Biochemical and biophysical approaches to studies of protein interactions, structures, and dynamics. Theory and practice of specific experimental approaches will provide a fundamental understanding on information potential and technique limitations. Specific applications from the current literature will be discussed. Student evaluations will include oral presentations describing studies using the techniques.

Prerequisites: CHM361H5 or (PHY332H5 or PHY333H5)
Recommended Preparation: CHM362H5 and JCP221H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JEG400Y5 • Geography / Environment Science Internship

Through a part-time, unpaid work placement, students apply the natural science based environmental science/physical geography expertise gained through previous course work. Placements are made at local conservation authorities, municipalities, environmental consulting companies, corporations, provincial or federal agencies, and other organizations. Students must submit an application online. Instructions for the application can be found on the Geography Department home page: https://utm.utoronto.ca/geography/field-internship-and-thesis-courses

Prerequisites: 15.0-18.0 credits and permission of instructor
Exclusions: ENV400Y5 or GGR410Y5

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JEG417Y5 • Honours Thesis

This course is designed to give students experience in the design and execution of an independent senior thesis under the supervision of a faculty member. In order to register in the course, students must obtain approval from a supervisor, complete an application form and submit the form to the Department of Geography. Please refer to the Department of Geography website for details: https://utm.utoronto.ca/geography/field-internship-and-thesis-courses. This course may fulfill field day components. Please consult with your supervisor.

Prerequisites: 14.0 credits

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Social Science, Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JGE378H5 • Natural Hazards

Earth is a dangerous place and risk is an inherent feature of life on this planet. Some of the events and processes that we call "hazardous," such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, tsunamis, cyclones, and forest fires are natural environmental processes. We define them as hazards only when they pose a threat to human interests. In this course we will examine natural hazards as well as some technological hazards, their causes, their potential impacts on people, and their management and mitigation.

Prerequisites: 9.0 credits
Exclusions: GGR378H5 or ERS317H5
Recommended Preparation: ENV100Y5 and ERS103H5 and ERS120H5 and GGR112H5

Distribution Requirement: Social Science, Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

JLP285H5 • Language, Mind, & Brain

Language is often described as a quintessentially human trait. What is the mental machinery underlying this ability? In this course, you will explore questions such as: Do animals have language? How do children learn language? How do we understand and produce language in real time? How does bilingualism work? What can neuroscience tell us about language abilities? What is the relationship between language and thinking?

Prerequisites: (LIN101H5 and LIN102H5) OR PSY100Y5
Exclusions: JLP374H1, PLIC55H3, PSY374H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JLP315H5 • Language Development

By three years of age, children have mastered many of the complexities of human language. How do they do this so rapidly, and with such ease? In this course, you will examine language acquisition from a cognitive perspective. Topics include the acquisition of speech sounds, sentence structure, and conversational abilities, as well as patterns of development in special populations. You will also learn about childhood bilingualism and social aspects of language development. Hands-on experience analyzing recordings of children will be provided.

Prerequisites: PSY201H5 (or equivalent) or (LIN288H5 or PSY274H5 or JLP285H5) and (PSY210H5 or PSY270H5 or PSY274H5) or (LIN101H5 and LIN102H5) or LIN200H5
Exclusions: JLP315H1, PSY315H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JLP383H5 • Adult Language Processing

Language is a key element in our social interactions, our ability to share information, and aspects of human culture. In this course you will engage in an advanced exploration of the cognitive machinery underlying language in adulthood. Key themes include: incremental interpretation and predictive processing; the relationship between language comprehension and production; and the nature of processing in bilinguals and speakers of less-studied languages. Practical activities address experimental methodology and aspects of data analysis.

Prerequisites: PSY201H5 (or equivalent) or (LIN288H5 or PSY274H5 or JLP285H5) and (PSY270H5 or PSY274H5) or (PSY315H5 or JLP315H5) or (LIN328H5 or PSY384H5 or JLP384H5) or (LIN101H5 and LIN102H5 or LIN200H5)
Exclusions: PSY374H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JLP384H5 • Speech Communication

Imagine an animal species where one creature can generate thoughts in other creatures' minds simply by causing the air molecules around them to vibrate. Although this sounds exotic, it is what we as humans do every time we speak and listen. In this course, we explore the perception and production of spoken language from an interdisciplinary perspective. Sample topics include perceptual and cognitive aspects of speech communication, speech signal acoustics, audio-visual speech integration, speech sound articulation, artificial speech recognition, multilingualism, and contextual influences on speech communication. Through laboratory exercises, students will replicate classic experimental findings and gain hands-on experience with acoustic and behavioural data analysis

Prerequisites: (PSY201H5 or LIN228H5) and one of LIN229H5 or LIN288H5 or LIN318H5 or PSY270H5 or PSY274H5 or PSY280H5 or PSY374H5
Exclusions: LIN328H5 and PSY384H5 and PLID50H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JLP388H5 • Bilingualism and Multiple Language Acquisition

What are the linguistic and psychological implications of knowing more than one language? This course will explore topics such as the bilingual brain, the nature of bilingual language input, effects of age-of-acquisition and language similarity, the status of heritage languages, schooling in a second language (for example French Immersion programs), and research methodologies used in the study of bilingualism. Bilingual/multilingual corpora will be examined.

Prerequisites: LIN288H5 or PSY274H5 or PSY315H5
Exclusions: FRE388H5 and JFL388H5 and LIN388H5 and PSY376H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JLP481H5 • Topics in Developmental Psycholinguistics

How do children's language comprehension and production abilities differ from adults? What can research on language acquisition tell us about why language looks the way it does? Developmental psycholinguists use experimental techniques to explore a range of topics in the area of child language comprehension and production. Drawing on cutting-edge interdisciplinary research, we will explore contemporary issues and debates in this area.

Prerequisites: (LIN288H5 or PSY274H5) and 1.0 credit from the following list: LIN318H5 or LIN328H5 or LIN329H5 or LIN332H5 or LIN385H5 or LIN418H5 or LIN421H5 or PSY315H5 or PSY374H5 or PSY384H5 or any JLP course.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

JLP483H5 • Topics in Adult Psycholinguistics

What is the connection between comprehending, producing, and thinking about language? How do the properties of different languages influence the nature of language processing? How is processing affected by differences across individuals? Drawing on a variety of perspective and methodologies, we will explore contemporary issues and debates in these and other topics.

Prerequisites: (LIN288H5 or PSY274H5 or JLP285H5) and 1.0 credit from the following list: (PSY315H5 or JLP315H5) or (PSY374H5 or JLP383H5) or (PSY384H5 or JFL388H5 or JLP388H5) or (LIN318H5 or LIN418H5) or JLP384H5 or JLP481H5.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT102H5 • Introduction to Mathematical Proofs

Understanding, using and developing precise expressions of mathematical ideas, including definitions and theorems. Set theory, logical statements and proofs, induction, topics chosen from combinatorics, elementary number theory, Euclidean geometry.

Prerequisites: Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U)
Exclusions: MAT138H1 or MAT246H1 or CSC165H1 or CSCA67H3
Recommended Preparation: Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 41L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT132H5 • Differential Calculus for Life Sciences

Review of functions and their graphs, trigonometry, exponentials and logarithms. Limits and continuity of functions of a single variable. Derivatives and differentiation techniques. Applications of differentiation, including extreme values, related rates and optimization. Life science applications are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) 
Exclusions: MAT133Y5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135H5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137H5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157H5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT133Y1 or MAT135Y1 or MAT135H1 or MAT137Y1 or MAT157Y1 or MATA29H3 or MATA30H3 or MATA31H3 or MATA32H3
Recommended Preparation: Highly Recommended: Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U)

Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in a Life Science Program.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 40L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT133Y5 • Calculus and Linear Algebra for Commerce

Mathematics of finance, matrices and linear equations. Review of differential calculus; applications. Integration and fundamental theorem; applications. Introduction to partial differentiation; applications. NOTE: This course cannot be used as the calculus prerequisite for any 200-level MAT or STA course, except in combination with MAT233H5.

Prerequisites: Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U).
Exclusions: MAT132H5 or MAT134H5 or MAT135H5 or MAT136H5 or MAT137H5 or MAT139H5 or MAT157H5 or MAT159H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT135H1 or MAT136H1 or MAT133Y1 or MAT135Y1 or MAT137Y1 or MAY157Y1 or MATA30H3 or MATA31H3 or MATA32H3 or MATA33H3 or MATA35H3 or MATA36H3 or MATA37H3
Recommended Preparation: Highly Recommended: Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U).

Enrolment Limits: This course cannot be used for the specialist or major programs in Mathematics, Statistics or Computer Science, except in combination with MAT233H5. Restricted to students admitted into Management or Commerce.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 80L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT134H5 • Integral Calculus for Life Sciences

Continuation of MAT132H5. Antiderivatives and indefinite integrals in one variable, definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Integration techniques and applications of integration. Infinite sequences, series and convergence tests. Power series, Taylor and Maclaurin series. Life science applications are emphasized.

Prerequisites: MAT132H5 or MAT135H5 or MAT137H5 or MAT157H5 or MAT135H1 or MATA29H3 or MATA30H3 or MATA31H3
Exclusions: MAT133Y5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT139H5 or MAT133Y1 or MAT135Y1 or MAT136H1 or MAT136H5 or MAT137Y1 or MAT157Y1 or MAT157Y5 or MAT159H5 or MATA33H3 or MATA35H3 or MATA36H3 or MATA37H3

Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in a Life Science Program.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 40L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT135H5 • Differential Calculus

Review of functions and their graphs, trigonometry, exponentials and logarithms. Limits and continuity of functions of a single variable. Derivatives and differentiation techniques. Applications of differentiation, including extreme values, related rates and optimization. A wide range of applications from the sciences will be discussed.

Prerequisites: Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) 
Exclusions: MAT132H5 or MAT133Y5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT137H5 or MAT133Y1 or MAT135Y1 or MAT135H1 or MAT137Y1 or MAT157Y1 or MAT157Y5 or MAT157H5 or MATA29H3 or MATA30H3 or MATA31H3 or MATA32H3
Recommended Preparation: Highly Recommended: Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U)

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 40L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT136H5 • Integral Calculus

Continuation of MAT135H5. Antiderivatives and indefinite integrals in one variable, definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Integration techniques and applications of integration. Infinite sequences, series and convergence tests. Power series, Taylor and Maclaurin series. A wide range of applications from the sciences will be discussed. 

Prerequisites: MAT132H5 or MAT135H5 or MAT137H5 or MAT157H5 or MAT135H1 or MATA29H3 or MATA30H3 or MATA31H3
Exclusions: MAT133Y5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT139H5 or MAT133Y1 or MAT135Y1 or MAT136H1 or MAT134H5 or MAT137Y1 or MAT157Y1 or MAT157Y5 or MAT159H5 or MATA33H3 or MATA35H3 or MATA36H3 or MATA37H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 40L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT137H5 • Differential Calculus for Mathematical Sciences

A conceptual approach to calculus. A focus on theoretical foundations and proofs as well as some emphasis on geometric and physical intuition. Limits and continuity, differentiation, the mean value, extreme value and inverse function theorems. Applications typically include related rates and optimization.

Prerequisites: Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) and Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U).
Exclusions: MAT132H5 or MAT133Y5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135H5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT157H5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT133Y1 or MAT135Y1 or MAT135H1 or MAT137Y1 or MAT157Y1 or MATA30H3 or MATA31H3 or MATA32H3 or MATA33H3 or MATA35H3 or MATA36H3 or MATA37H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 40L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT139H5 • Integral Calculus for Mathematical Sciences

A conceptual sequel to MAT137H5. Integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, sequences and series, power series and Taylor’s theorem. Applications typically include approximation, integration techniques, areas and volumes.

Prerequisites: MAT137H5 or MAT157H5
Exclusions: MAT133Y5 or MAT134H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT136H5 or MAT137H5 or MAT157H5 or MAT157Y5 MAT133Y1 or MAT135Y1 or MAT135H1 or MAT137Y1 or MAT157Y1 or MATA30H3 or MATA31H3 or MATA32H3 or MATA33H3 or MATA35H3 or MATA36H3 or MATA37H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 40L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT157H5 • Analysis I

A rigorous and proof-intensive introduction to the analysis of single variable real-valued functions for students with a serious interest in mathematics. Topics typically include the construction of the real numbers, the epsilon-delta definition of the limit, continuity, and differentiation.

Prerequisites: [Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U)] and [Minimum 70% in Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U)]
Corequisites: MAT102H5 (strongly recommended in the Fall term for students taking MAT157H5 in their first year).
Exclusions: MAT157Y5 or MAT157Y1 or MATA37H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT159H5 • Analysis II

A rigorous and proof-intensive sequel to MAT157H5 for students with a serious interest in mathematics. Topics typically include sequences, series, and integration of single variable real-valued functions.

Prerequisites: MAT157H5
Exclusions: MAT157Y5 or MAT157Y1 or MATA37H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT202H5 • Introduction to Discrete Mathematics

Mathematics derives its great power from its ability to formulate abstract concepts and techniques. In this course, students will be introduced to abstraction and its power through a study of topics from discrete mathematics. The topics covered will include: Sets, relations and functions; Basic counting techniques: subsets, permutations, finite sequences, inclusion-exclusion; Discrete probability: random variables paradoxes and surprises; Basic number theory: properties of the integers and the primes. The course will emphasize active participation of the students in discussion and written assignments.

Prerequisites: MAT102H5 and (MAT134H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT136H5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT139H5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT159H5 or MAT233H5)

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT223H5 • Linear Algebra I

Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, determinants. Vector geometry in R2 and R3. Complex numbers. Rn: subspaces, linear independence, bases, dimension, column spaces, null spaces, rank and dimension formula. Orthogonality, orthonormal sets, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization process, least square approximation. Linear transformations from Rn to Rm. The determinant, classical adjoint, Cramer's rule. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, eigenspaces, diagonalization. Function spaces and applications to a system of linear differential equations. The real and complex number fields.

Prerequisites: Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) and Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U or MAT102H5).
Exclusions: MAT223H1 or MATA22H3 or MATA23H3 or MAT240H1 or MAT240H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 40L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class, Hybrid

MAT224H5 • Linear Algebra II

Abstract vector spaces: subspaces, dimension theory. Linear mappings: kernel, image, dimension theorem, isomorphisms, matrix of a linear transformation. Change of basis, invariant subspaces, direct sums, cyclic subspaces, Cayley-Hamilton theorem. Inner product spaces, orthogonal transformations, orthogonal diagonalization, quadratic forms, positive definite matrices. Complex operators: Hermitian, unitary and normal. Spectral Theorem. Isometries of R2 and R3.

Prerequisites: MAT102H5 and MAT223H5
Exclusions: MAT240H5 or MAT224H1 or MATB24H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT232H5 • Calculus of Several Variables

Differential and integral calculus of several variables: partial differentiation, chain rule, extremal problems, Lagrange multipliers, classification of critical points. Multiple integrals, Green's theorem and related topics.

Prerequisites: MAT134H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT136H5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT139H5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT159H5
Exclusions: MAT233H5 or MAT235Y1 or MAT237Y1 or MAT257Y5 or MAT257Y1 or MATB41H3
Recommended Preparation: MAT223H5 or MAT240H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 40L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT233H5 • Calculus of Several Variables

"Bridging Course"; accepted as prerequisite for upper level courses in replacement of MAT232H5. Limited Enrolment. Sequences and series, power series, Taylor series, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions and their use in integrations. Differential and integral calculus of several variables; partial differentiation, chain rule, extremal problems, Lagrange multipliers, classification of critical points. Multiple integrals, Green's theorem and related topics.

Prerequisites: MAT134H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT136H5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT139H5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT159H5 or 65% in MAT133Y5
Exclusions: MAT232H5 or MAT235Y1 or MAT237Y1 or MAT257Y1 or MAT257Y5 or MATB41H3
Recommended Preparation: MAT223H5 or MAT240H5

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 48L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT236H5 • Vector Calculus

The implicit function theorem, vector fields. Transformations. Parametrized integrals. Line, surface and volume integrals. Theorems of Gauss and Stokes with applications.

Prerequisites: MAT102H5 and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5) and (MAT232H5 or MAT233H5)
Exclusions: MAT235Y1 or MAT237Y1 or MAT257Y1 or MAT257Y5 or MATB42H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs; Astronomical Sciences Specialist (ERSPE1025) and Astronomy Major (ERMAJ2204) programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT240H5 • Algebra I

A theoretical approach to Linear Algebra and its foundations, aimed at students with a serious interest in Mathematics. Topics to be covered: Vector spaces over arbitrary fields (including C and finite fields), linear equations and matrices, bases and linear independence, linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, similarity, change of basis, diagonalization, the characteristic and minimal polynomials, the Cayley-Hamilton theorem.

Prerequisites: 65% in MAT102H5
Exclusions: MAT224H5 or MAT224H1 or MAT240H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT244H5 • Differential Equations I

Ordinary differential equations of the first and second order, existence and uniqueness; solutions by series and integrals; linear systems of first order; linearization of non-linear systems. Applications in life and physical sciences. Power series solutions, boundary value problems, Fourier series solutions, numerical methods.

Prerequisites: (MAT134H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT136H5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT139H5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT159H5 or MAT233H5) and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5).
Exclusions: MAT322H5 or MAT244H1 or MAT267H1 or MATB44H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs; Astronomical Sciences Specialist (ERSPE1025), Astronomy Major (ERMAJ2204), Biophysics Specialist (ERSPE1944), and Physics Major (ERMAJ1944).
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT247H5 • Algebra II

Continuation of MAT240H5. A theoretical approach to real and complex inner product spaces, isometries, orthogonal and unitary matrices and transformations. The adjoint. Hermitian and symmetric transformations. Spectral theorem for symmetric and normal transformations. Polar representation theorem. Primary decomposition theorem. Rational and Jordan canonical forms. Additional topics including dual spaces, quotient spaces, bilinear forms, quadratic surfaces, multilinear algebra.

Prerequisites: MAT240H5 or MAT240H1
Exclusions: MAT247H1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT257Y5 • Analysis III

A rigorous and proof-intensive course in multivariable calculus for students with a serious interest in mathematics.  Topology of metric spaces; compactness, functions and continuity, the extreme value theorem. Derivatives; inverse and implicit function theorems, maxima and minima. Integration; Fubini's theorem, partitions of unity, change of variables. Integration on manifolds; Stokes' theorem.  

Prerequisites: (MAT157Y5 or MAT159H5) and MAT240H5
Exclusions: MAT237Y1 or MAT257Y1

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/48T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Departmental permission.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT301H5 • Groups and Symmetries

Permutations and permutation groups. Linear groups. Abstract groups, homomorphisms, subgroups. Symmetry groups of regular polygons and platonic solids, wallpaper groups. Group actions, class formula. Cosets, Lagrange's theorem. Normal subgroups, quotient groups. Classification of finitely generated Abelian Groups. Emphasis on examples and calculations.

Prerequisites: MAT102H5 and (MAT202H5 or MAT224H5 or MAT240H5)
Exclusions: MAT301H1 or MAT347Y1 or MATC01H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT302H5 • Introduction to Algebraic Cryptography

(Cross list with CSC322H5) The course will take students on a journey through the methods of algebra and number theory in cryptography, from Euclid to Zero Knowledge Proofs. Topics include: block ciphers and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES); algebraic and number-theoretic techniques and algorithms in cryptography, including methods for primality testing and factoring large numbers; encryption and digital signature systems based on RSA, factoring, elliptic curves and integer lattices; and zero-knowledge proofs.

Prerequisites: (MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT301H5
Exclusions: CSC322H5 or MATD16H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT305H5 • Elementary Lie Theory

This course is an introduction to the theory of matrix groups with a particular emphasis on applications and examples. This course will cover orthogonal transformations in two and three dimensions, quaternions, isometries of Euclidean space, Lie algebras and matrix exponentials.

Prerequisites: [(MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT236H5] or MAT257Y5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT307H5 • Curves and Surfaces

This course is an introduction to the theory of curves and surfaces with a particular emphasis on applications and computational techniques. This course will cover curves in R2 and R3, curvature, torsion, differential of maps, First Fundamental Form, Parallel transport, Bishop Frames, Geodesics, Gauss-Bonnet Theorem, and Gaussian curvature.


Prerequisites: [( MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and (MAT232H5 or MAT233H5)] or MAT257Y5
Exclusions: MAT363H1 or MAT367H1or MATC63H3 or MATD26H3 or MATD67H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT309H5 • Introduction to Mathematical Logic

The relationships among axioms, proofs, consistency and truth in mathematics. Soundness and Completeness. Introductions to model theory, set theory, and computability; arithmetic as a central example. Gödel's incompleteness theorems; outlines of their proofs. This course emphasizes rigour.

Prerequisites: MAT257Y5 or [MAT236H5 and (MAT202H5 or MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and 0.5 additional credit of MAT at the 300+ level]
Exclusions: CSC438H1 or MAT309H1 or MAT409H1 or MAT357Y1 or MATC09H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics and Computer Science Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT311H5 • Partial Differential Equations

Partial differential equations of applied mathematics, mathematical models of physical phenomena, basic methodology.

Prerequisites: MAT257Y5 or (MAT236H5 and MAT244H5)
Exclusions: APM346H1 or APM351Y1 or MAT351Y1 or MATC46H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs; Astronomical Sciences Specialist (ERSPE1025), Astronomy Major (ERMAJ2204).
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT315H5 • Introduction to Number Theory

Elementary topics in number theory such as: prime numbers; arithmetic with residues; Gaussian integers, quadratic reciprocity law, representation of numbers as sums of squares. (This course emphasizes rigour). 

Prerequisites: MAT102H5 and [MAT134H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT136H5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT139H5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT159H5 or (MAT133Y5 and MAT233H5)] and (MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT301H5
Exclusions: MAT315H1 or MATC15H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT322H5 • Mathematical Modelling in Biology

The course will serve as an introduction to mathematical modelling of biological processes. It will cover a selection of the following topics: Difference equations and applications. Linear differential equations and systems; phase plane analysis; nonlinear systems of differential equations and linearization; Poincaré-Bendixson Theorem. Applications of differential equations to biology, including a logistic population with harvesting; predator-prey model; competing species; epidemic models. Examples of partial differential equations; reaction-diffusion equation; pattern formation.

Prerequisites: MAT102H5 and (MAT134H5 or MAT136H5 or MAT139H5 or MAT159H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT233H5) and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5)
Exclusions: MAT388H5 (Fall 2019 and Fall 2020) or MAT244H5 or MAT244H1 or MATB44H3. or MATC58H3

Enrolment Limits: Restricted at all times to students in the Math Minor program.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: Online, In Class

MAT332H5 • Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos

Stability in nonlinear systems of differential equations, bifurcation theory, chaos, strange attractors, iteration of nonlinear mappings and fractals. This course will be geared towards students with interest in sciences.

Prerequisites: MAT257Y5 or [MAT236H5 and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT244H5]
Exclusions: MAT335H1 or MATC35H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics or Statistics Specialist or Major programs and Bioinformatic Specialist.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT334H5 • Complex Variables

Theory of functions of one complex variable: analytic and meromorphic functions; Cauchy's theorem, residue calculus. Topics from: conformal mappings, analytic continuation, harmonic functions.

Prerequisites: MAT257Y5 or [(MAT232H5 or MAT233H5) and (MAT202H5 or MAT240H5 or 0.5 additional credit of MAT at the 300+ level with a mark of at least 60%)]
Exclusions: MAT334H1 or MAT354H5 or MAT354H1 or MATC34H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs; Astronomical Sciences Specialist (ERSPE1025), Astronomy Major (ERMAJ2204).
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT337H5 • Introduction to Real Analysis

(Formerly MAT378H5) The real numbers; Sequences and series; Functional limits; Topology in R^n; Differentiation and Integration; Power Series; Metric Spaces; Integrability and sets of measure zero. The course emphasizes rigour and theory.

Prerequisites: MAT257Y5 or [(MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT236H5 and MAT244H5]
Exclusions: MAT378H5 or MAT337H1 or MAT357H1 or MATB43H3 or MATC37H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics or Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT344H5 • Introduction to Combinatorics

Basic counting principles, generating functions, permutations with restrictions. Fundamentals of graph theory with algorithms; applications (including network flows).

Prerequisites: MAT102H5 and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5)
Exclusions: MAT344H1 or MATC44H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics or Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT354H5 • Complex Analysis

Complex numbers, the complex plane and Riemann sphere, Möbius transformations, elementary functions and their mapping properties, conformal mapping, holomorphic functions, Cauchy's theorem and integral formula. Taylor and Laurent series, maximum modulus principle, Schwarz' lemma, residue theorem and residue calculus.

Prerequisites: MAT257Y5 or [(MAT137Y5 or MAT139H5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT159H5) and (MAT202H5 or MAT240H5 or MAT337H5) and (MAT232H5 or MAT233H5)]
Exclusions: MAT334H1 or MAT334H5 or MAT354H1 or MATC34H3 or MATD34H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics or Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT382H5 • Mathematics for Teachers

The course discusses the Mathematics curriculum (K-12) from the following aspects: the strands of the curriculum and their place in the world of Mathematics, the nature of the proofs, applications of Mathematics, and the connection of Mathematics to other subjects. Restricted to students in the MAT major and specialist programs. 

Prerequisites: (Minimum 60% in MAT134H5 or MAT134Y5 or MAT135Y5 or MAT136H5 or MAT137Y5 or MAT139H5 or MAT157Y5 or MAT159H5 or MAT233H5) and [minimum 60% in MAT102H5 and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5)] and 0.5 additional credit of MAT at the 200+ level.
Exclusions: MAT329Y1 or MATC82H3

Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT387H5 • Topics in Mathematics

Introduction to a topic of current interest in mathematics. Content will vary from year to year. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, T) from year to year, but will be between 36-60 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate prerequisite requirement(s) will be available on the UTM timetable along with the topic title prior to course registration.

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics or Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT388H5 • Topics in Mathematics

Introduction to a topic of current interest in mathematics. Content will vary from year to year. This course may include a tutorial and/or practical section in some years. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, T) from year to year, but will be between 36-60 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate prerequisite requirement(s) will be available on the UTM timetable along with the topic title prior to course registration.

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT392H5 • Ideas of Mathematics

This is a one-term course to give students extensive practice in the writing of mathematics. The format will be to study excellent expositions of important ideas of mathematics and then to assign short writing assignments based on them.

Prerequisites: MAT202H5 and MAT244H5 and (MAT236H5 or MAT257Y5) and (MAT224H5 or MAT247H5)
Exclusions: MATC90H3

Enrolment Limits: Limited enrolment. The course is open only to students in the MAT major/specialist programs, with priority to students in the specialist program.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT397H5 • Further Studies in Mathematics

Students explore a topic in mathematics under the supervision of a faculty member. Interested students must consult with mathematics faculty at least two months prior to registration, to determine the topic and scope.

Prerequisites: Departmental permission and a minimum CGPA of 2.5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or Major programs.
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT398H5 • Further Studies in Mathematics

Students explore a topic in mathematics under the supervision of a faculty member. Interested students must consult with mathematics faculty at least two months prior to registration, to determine the topic and scope.

Prerequisites: Departmental permission and a minimum CGPA of 2.5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in Mathematics Specialist or Major programs.
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their third year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 399Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Departmental permission.

Distribution Requirement: Science
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT401H5 • Polynomial Equations and Fields

Commutative rings; quotient rings. Construction of the rationals. Polynomial algebra. Fields and Galois theory: Field extentions, adjunction of roots of a polynomial. Constructibiliy, trisection of angles, construction of regular polygons. Galois groups of polynomials, in particular cubics, quartics. Insolvability of quintics by radicals.

Prerequisites: (MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and (MAT236H5 or MAT257Y5) and MAT301H5
Exclusions: MAT347Y1 or MAT401H1 or MATD01H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT402H5 • Classical Geometries

Euclidean and non-Euclidean plane and space geometries. Real and complex projective space. Models of the hyperbolic plane. Connections with the geometry of surfaces.

Prerequisites: MAT102H5 and (MAT232H5 or MAT233H5 or MAT257Y5) and (MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and 0.5 additional credit of MAT at the 300+ level.
Exclusions: MAT402H1 or MATD02H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT405H5 • Introduction to Topology

Sets and functions; Topology in R^n; Topological spaces; Open and closed sets; Closure and interior; Continuous functions; Quotient spaces; Connectedness and compactness; Separation axioms and related theorems.

Prerequisites: MAT257Y5 or [(MAT224H5 or MAT240H5) and MAT236H5 and at least 0.5 additional credit of MAT at the 300+ level with a mark of at least 65%]
Exclusions: MAT327H1 or MATC27H3
Recommended Preparation: MAT337H5

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT406H5 • Mathematical Introduction to Game Theory

Combinatorial games: Nim and other impartial games; Sprague-Grundy value; existence of a winning strategy in partisan games. Two-player (matrix) games: zero-sum games and Von-Neuman's minimax theorem; general sum-matrix games, prisoner's dilemma, Nash equilibrium, cooperative games, asymmetric information. Multi-player games: coalitions and the Shapley value. Possible additional topics: repeated (stochastic) games; auctions; voting schemes and Arrow's paradox. Mathematical tools that may be introduced include hyperplane separation of convex sets and Brouwer's fixed point theorem. Numerous examples will be analyzed in depth, to offer insight to the mathematical theory and its relation with real life situations.

Prerequisites: MAT102H5 and (MAT223H5 or MAT240H5) and (STA246H5 or STA256H5)
Exclusions: ECO316H1 or MATD50H3

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT478H5 • Topics in Mathematics

Introduction to a topic of current interest in mathematics. Content will vary from year to year. This course may include a tutorial and/or practical section in some years. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, T) from year to year, but will be between 36-60 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate prerequisite requirement(s) will be available on the UTM timetable along with the topic title prior to course registration.

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT488H5 • Topics in Mathematics

Introduction to a topic of current interest in mathematics. Content will vary from year to year. This course may include a tutorial and/or practical section in some years. The contact hours for this course may vary in terms of contact type (L, T) from year to year, but will be between 36-60 contact hours in total. See the UTM Timetable.

Prerequisites: Appropriate prerequisite requirement(s) will be available on the UTM timetable along with the topic title prior to course registration.

Enrolment Limits: Priority is given to students enrolled in the Mathematics Specialist or Major programs.
Distribution Requirement: Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

MAT492H5 • Senior Thesis

An exposition on a topic in mathematics written under the supervision of a faculty member. Open to students in Mathematical Sciences Specialist program.

Prerequisites: MAT392H5 and 2.0 additional credits in MAT at the 300 level and a minimum CGPA of 2.5

Enrolment Limits: Only open to students in the MAT major/specialist programs.
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: