ARA210H5 • Arab Culture I

This course introduces the Arab culture in general terms and familiarizes students with some fundamental realities of the Arab world (e.g. family, gender roles, social etiquette, etc.) with a general introduction to values and religious practices. The course is taught in English.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA212Y5 • Introductory Arabic

This introductory course is designed for beginners, i.e., students with NO prior knowledge of the Arabic language. The course provides a basic proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. The students will have ample practice of reading and writing the Arabic alphabet and will master the Arabic sounds and their phono-syntactic features. A foundation of grammar will familiarize the students with word formation, word order, and sentence structures. By the end of the course, the students should be able to fully read Arabic, comprehend simple reading, produce complete sentences to express basic information orally and in writing, and to conduct basic conversations in Modern Standard Arabic. All students are REQUIRED to complete the Arabic Language Assessment Questionnaire before enrolling in this course. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires and complete the Arabic Language Assessment Questionnaire by no later than August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.


Prerequisites: All students who are enrolling in an ARA language course for the FIRST time are required to complete a language assessment questionnaire. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…
Exclusions: ARA211H5 or ARA211Y5 or (LGGA40H3 and LGGA41H3) or (NMC210Y1 or NML210Y1) or higher, native speakers.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA300Y5 • Intermediate Arabic for Heritage Learners

This is an Arabic language course for heritage students, i.e. of Arab origins, who may have had passive exposure to Arabic but have never formally studied the reading and writing of Arabic. This course is also designed to help students with interest in Islamic studies who may have been exposed to elementary Qur’anic teaching but were never taught the alphabet, and who cannot communicate in spoken or written Arabic. In this course, students will begin by learning how to sound, read and write the Arabic alphabet. They will study Arabic grammar, develop reading comprehension, and practice writing skills that advance gradually throughout the course. Each unit of the course is fully supported by a range of comprehension, vocabulary-building, grammar reinforcement activities, and reading & writing exercises. Language analysis will be based on the reading of excerpts of authentic Arabic texts from contemporary literature, magazines and newspapers. By the end of this course, students will have completed the prerequisites to take Arabic reading, literature, and advanced language courses. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment… and complete the Arabic Language Assessment Questionnaire by no later than August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.

Prerequisites: As determined by assessment questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: ARA211H5 and ARA311H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA305Y5 • Introductory Egyptian Colloquial Arabic

This is an introductory course designed for high beginner level students, who desire to acquire fluency in spoken Egyptian Arabic, commonly known as Egyptian or Cairene Arabic. The course follows a teaching approach that places emphasis on the development of the listening and speaking skills of spoken Egyptian Arabic. This course develops communicative skills in Egyptian colloquial Arabic along parallel tracks of vocabulary and grammar. Therefore, student must be independently comfortable with the Arabic alphabet and must have developed elementary reading ability. The course is designed for students who have completed the beginner level of modern Standard Arabic ARA212Y5Y, and are now ready to branch out into their first experience of a major spoken dialect.

Prerequisites: ARA212Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA312Y5 • Intermediate Arabic

This course is for students who have basic background information in formal Arabic. To study this course, students should be able to write and speak simple sentences to express basic information in formal Arabic. The course builds on the skills that students have learned in ARA212Y5. By the end of this course, students should be able to use formal Arabic at an intermediate low level using ACTFL guidelines. Everyday language in the Egyptian and Levantine accents will be provided occasionally as supplementary materials for students' information only. However, students' skills will be assessed using formal Arabic only, which is the focus of this course.

Prerequisites: ARA212Y5
Exclusions: Native users or NMC310Y1 or NML310Y1 or LGGC42H3 or LGGC43H3 or ARA211H5 or ARA311H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA400Y5 • Advanced Arabic for Heritage Learners

This course develops the student's communication skills in grammar, writing, reading, and formal registers of speaking, into an advanced level. It caters to the students who have completed the intermediate high level: ARA300, or whose language assessment reflects an intermediate level of proficiency of Arabic as a heritage language. The teaching of this course will also focus on error analysis to develop the student’s ability to distinguish between their version of heritage spoken language and that of the erudite Arabic, الفُصْحى, as used formally across the Arab world. By the end of the course, the student will be able to write in a formal academic register, sustain oral expressions and deliver oral presentations in formal Arabic.

Prerequisites: ARA300Y5 or appropriate language level as indicated by the Arabic Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires).
Exclusions: ARA412Y5 and NML410Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA408H5 • Arabs in Western Literature and Arts: Reception and Interpretation

(Offered in English).This survey course examines representative fiction and non-fiction texts, painting, films, operas, comics and video games to explore salient incidences of encounter, impact, and reception of the Arabs in medieval and modern Western thought. Examples of topics of analysis are Islamic imagery in Dante’s Inferno, motifs of storytelling and narrative structures from the One Thousand and One night in Boccaccio’s Decameron and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales…From the Moors in Spain, to the Arabs in Sicily, from Shakespeare’s Othello to the Victorian Gothic Vathek, the course will move on to explore the extension of the French Orientalists’ influence beyond European painting to operas, and later in cinema, exploring works such as Il Seraglio, Lawrence Arabia, Casablanca and others. Current representations of the Arabs in Western films, TV shows, comics, and video games will be analyzed to trace continuity and discontinuity of the earlier reception. Students who take this course to be counted towards the Language Citation must complete written course work in Arabic.

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have completed 9.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA410H5 • Advanced Arabic Reading I: Reading the Sacred and the Legendary

This is the first of two intensive advanced reading courses in the Arabic language. Throughout this course, the students will also be familiar with different sacred texts such as Tafsīr (Quranic exegesis) and Qiṣas al-Anbiyā’ (Tales of the Prophets) to the fables focused on the description of amazing and mythological creatures such as Qazvīni’s ‘Ajā’ib al-Makhlūqāt wa Gharā’ib alMawjūdāt (Marvels of Creatures and Strange things existing) and Kalīla wa Dimna as well as the epic of the legendary Arabic heroin Dhāt al-Himma in Sīrat Dhāt al-Himma.

Prerequisites: ARA311H5 or ARA312Y5
Corequisites: ARA412Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA411H5 • Advanced Arabic Reading II: Literary Journeys into the Past

This is the second of two intensive advanced reading courses in the Arabic language. This course will concentrate on works relating to history which includes universal histories in the world from creation up to their own eras; biographies of individuals and biographical dictionaries, advice literature that guide rulers to govern efficiently; poetry by poets and poetesses; maqãmãt or works of rhymed prose; mystical texts; travelogues that describe the adventures and observations of travelers to faraway lands; annalistic chronicles that record events from year to year; and chancery documents that shed light on the way medieval administrations worked.

Prerequisites: ARA311H5 or ARA312Y5
Corequisites: ARA412Y5
Recommended Preparation: ARA410H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ARA412Y5 • Advanced Arabic

This course uses differentiated instruction and assessment methods to provide Arabic language instruction to two groups of students: 1) advanced learners of Arabic as a foreign language, and 2) heritage students who may have native or native-like proficiency in the Arabic language. Both groups of learners will have customized study materials and assessment schemes that provide for their specific learning needs and language abilities.

Prerequisites: (ARA312Y5 or ARA311H5). Students who have not completed ARA312Y5 or ARA311H5 must obtain permission from the department before enrolling.
Exclusions: NML410Y1 or ARA400Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT423H5 • Game Development Project

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) This course will provide the opportunity to develop a practical understanding of the game development cycle. Students will design and develop an original game in support of a specific narrative, set of rules or play mechanics.

Prerequisites: CCT311H5 or CCT312H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT451H5 • Digital Media: Advanced Audio Production

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) This course explores how to design and produce a soundtrack for film or television. The foundations of technical theory and nomenclature will be provided, as well as aesthetic guidelines. Practical exercises will explore: voice recording, use of library sound effects, creative sound design, sound editing and processing technology and soundtrack mixing.

Prerequisites: CCT353H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT453H5 • Digital Media: Advanced Video Production

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) This course focuses on advanced theoretical and practical aspects of video production and editing. Storytelling techniques, the relationship of form to content, and montage strategies will be investigated. Over the course of the term students will work in teams to direct, film and edit video using digital technologies.

Prerequisites: CCT353H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 48P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CCT454H5 • Documentary Practices

This course explores the form and practice of documentary. Objectivity, ethics, censorship, representation, reflexivity, responsibility to the audience and authorial voice will be examined. Students will engage in practical engagement with documentary forms including the expanded field of documentary using tools such as photography, audio, video, 360 video, VR and new technologies.


Prerequisites: A minimum of 13.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI101H5 • Introductory Chinese for Students with Prior Background

This course is designed for students who have some prior knowledge of Chinese. Potential students for this course are able to speak and understand elementary Mandarin or any Chinese dialects but with minimal literacy skills (reading and writing), or are able to read and write with either traditional or simplified character at beginner level. This course focuses on phonetics and literacy of Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) and addresses integrated skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing and translation.

Prerequisites: NOTE: All students who are enrolling in a CHI language course for the first time (do not have the prerequisite) are required to complete a language assessment questionnaire. Students who have not completed an assessment cannot be approved for course enrolment. Please visit www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/chineselanguage-course-questionnai….
Exclusions: CHI100Y5 or CHI101Y5 or EAS100Y1 or EAS101Y1 or LGG60H3 or LGG61H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI103H5 • Introductory Chinese I

Intended for students with none or minimal background in Mandarin or any Chinese dialects, this course provides a comprehensive introduction to phonetics and written form of Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) and covers the topics of functional Chinese at beginner level. All students are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire before enrolling in this course. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires and complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire by no later than August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.

Prerequisites: All students are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires) before enrolling in this course.
Exclusions: CHI100Y5 or EAS100Y1 or EAS101Y1 or LGGA60H3 or LGGA61H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI104H5 • Introductory Chinese II

As the second half of Introductory Chinese, this course continues to expand students’ knowledge and develop their language skills of Mandarin. More topics of functional Chinese are covered in this course. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite of CHI103H5 are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).

Prerequisites: CHI103H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: CHI100Y5 or EAS100Y1 or EAS101Y1 or LGGA60H3 or LGGA61H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI203H5 • Intermediate Low Chinese I

As a continuation of Introductory Chinese, this course aims at developing students' language comprehension, expanding their vocabulary and grammar, and improving their skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing and translation in Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) at intermediate level. The course content is focused on functional topics. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…) by August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.


Prerequisites: CHI104H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: CHI200Y5 or CHI201H5 or CHI202H5 or EAS200Y1 or EAS201H1 or LGGB60H3 or LGGB61H3 or LGGB62H3 or LGGB63H3 or LGGB64H3 or LGGB65H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI204H5 • Intermediate Low Chinese II

As the second half of Intermediate Chinese, this course continues to develop students' language comprehension, expand their vocabulary and grammar, and improve their skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing and translation in Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) at the intermediate level. The course content is focused on functional topics. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite for this course are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire before enrolling in this course. Please visit https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires and complete the assessment questionnaire by no later than August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.  

Prerequisites: CHI203H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: CHI200Y5 or CHI201H5 or EAS200Y1 or EAS201H1 or LGGB60H3 or LGGB61H3 or LGGB62H3 or LGGB63H3 or LGGB64H3 or LGGB65H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI211H5 • Chinese for Academic Purposes I

This course, designed for native or near-native speakers of Mandarin Chinese, develops rhetorical knowledge and critical thinking skills for effective academic reading and writing. Students will also receive training in conducting effective formal presentations with supporting media and public speaking skills.

Prerequisites: Appropriate language level as indicated in the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires) or interview.
Exclusions: CHI200Y5 or CHI201Y5 or CHI201H5 or CHI202H5 or EAS200Y1 or EAS201H1 or LGGB60H3 or LGGB61H3 or LGGB62H3 or LGGB63H3 or LGGB64H3 or LGGB65H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI212H5 • Chinese for Academic Purposes II

This course, designed for native or near-native speakers of Mandarin Chinese, continues the study of rhetorical knowledge and critical thinking skills for effective academic reading and writing. It also prepares students for upper level courses which demand in-depth reading, writing, as well as professional presentation skills.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 or appropriate language level as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment-questionnaires) or interview.
Exclusions: CHI200Y5 or CHI201Y5 or CHI202H5 or EAS200Y1 or EAS201H1 or LGGB60H3 or LGGB61H3 or LGGB62H3 or LGGB63H3 or LGGB64H3 or LGGB65H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI303H5 • Intermediate High Chinese I

This course, designed for second-language learners of Mandarin Chinese, aims to: 1) develop listening and speaking skills in handling daily routines and social situations related to personal lives; 2) improve reading and writing skills in narration and description on everyday topics; and 3) cultivate cultural knowledge that facilitates effective intercultural communication. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…) by August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.

Prerequisites: CHI204H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: CHI201H5 and CHI202H5 and LGGC60H3 and LGGC61H3 and EAS300Y1.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI304H5 • Intermediate High Chinese II

This course, designed for second-language learners of Mandarin Chinese, is the second half of Intermediate High Chinese. It continues to: 1) develop listening and speaking skills in handling daily routines and social situations related to personal lives; 2) improve reading and writing skills in narration and description on everyday topics; and 3) cultivate cultural knowledge that facilitates effective intercultural communication. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…) by August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.


Prerequisites: CHI303H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: CHI201H5 or CHI202H5 or EAS300Y1 or LGGC60H3 or LGGC61H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI308H5 • Chinese Cultural Studies Seminar

This seminar course provides a platform for critical discussion of what we call "Chinese culture". Students will consider ideas of invented traditions, the essentialization of culture, and questions about modern states and regions. Topics may include Chinese civilization, customs, rituals, religion, philosophy, ideology, morals, literature, folk art and craft, performance arts, martial arts, cuisine, medicine, etc. The discussions will draw from historical and contemporary topics.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI310H5 • Chinese for Career Development

This course is designed for near-native or native speakers of Mandarin Chinese who are interested in advancing their careers in Chinese-speaking regions and in North America. Students will develop knowledge in career planning from cross-cultural perspectives, from job search, to applications and interview processes in Chinese-speaking regions of Asia and in North America. They will build a solid foundation for reading, writing, and speaking Chinese in a business setting.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI311H5 • Classical Chinese Literature

This course will examine representative genres of traditional Chinese literature—poetry, prose, fiction, and drama—with an emphasis on language structure, style, and the influence on modern Chinese society and culture. We will also analyze the aesthetic features of classics and discuss the influences of traditional Chinese society on literature in terms of religion, philosophy, the imperial system, gender, family, and ethnicity.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5
Exclusions: EAS358Y1 and EAS306Y1 and LGGC66H3 and LGGC67H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI312H5 • Chinese Diaspora Literature and Culture

This course examines literary and cinematic works as well as visual art by authors of the Chinese diaspora. The course covers topics such as multiculturalism, racism, cultural preservation, invented traditions, and agency through the lens of overseas Chinese writers and creators.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5
Exclusions: LGGC62H3 or LGGC63H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI313H5 • The Wisdom of Life in Traditional Chinese Culture

This course explores different thought systems, ideas and the wisdom of human life rooted in traditional Chinese culture from the following two approaches: a theoretical discussion of the purpose, meaning, and value of human life, ideals and ways of life, existential questions and multiple solutions; and a historical as well as critical examination of the conventional wisdom originated by Chinese cultural figures like Laozi, Confucius, Mencius, Sima Qian, Zhu Xi, Qian Mu, Qian Zhongshu and more. The goal of the course is to facilitate student consideration of the essence of human life and the understanding of contemporary Chinese views by ascertaining traditional Chinese erudition. Through the examination of traditional Chinese scholarship, students will develop an understanding of the connection between such teachings and contemporary Chinese views.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5
Exclusions: EAS414H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI314H5 • Chinese Culture through Media

This course examines Chinese cultural traditions and values through contemporary media produced in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Background readings and literary works will provide students with the necessary historical and cultural context for each work. Class discussions will focus on the political, social and cultural transformations presented in the media. Special attention will be paid to topics such as family, class issues, gender and identity.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI403H5 • Advanced Chinese I

This course, designed for second-language learners of Mandarin Chinese, aims to: 1) develop listening and speaking skills in handling most informal and some formal communicative tasks; 2) strengthen reading and writing skills in expository and persuasive essays on familiar cultural and social topics; 3) cultivate cultural knowledge that facilitates effective intercultural communication. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…) by August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.

Prerequisites: CHI304H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: EAS401H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI404H5 • Advanced Chinese II

This course, designed for second-language learners of Mandarin Chinese, is the second half of Advanced Chinese. It continues to: 1) develop listening and speaking skills in handling most informal and some formal communicative tasks; 2) strengthen reading and writing skills in expository and persuasive essays on familiar cultural and social topics; and 3) cultivate cultural knowledge that facilitates effective intercultural communication. Students who have not completed the listed prerequisite are REQUIRED to complete the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…) by August 29th. Late assessment submissions will not be accepted.

Prerequisites: CHI403H5 or as indicated by the Chinese Language Assessment Questionnaire (https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/language-studies/language-course-assessment…).
Exclusions: EAS402H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI408H5 • Reading Confucianism in Modern Chinese

This advanced level course covers seminal readings on Confucianism written in modern Chinese language. The course examines Confucian doctrines and the development of Confucianism from ancient time to the contemporary era. Critical reading and essay writing skills will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI409H5 • Influence of Confucianism on Chinese Culture

This advanced level course discusses the cultural influence of Confucianism on Chinese writing, philosophy, religion, education, literature, customs, ethics, society and so forth. The readings covered in this course are mainly in modern Chinese language. Critical reading and essay writing skills will be stressed.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI410H5 • Modern Chinese Literature Studies

This seminar course offers a critical examination of modern Chinese literature. modern Chinese literature. The primary focus will be on representative works of poetry, prose, drama, and fiction. Discussions will emphasize historical, cultural, and social-political contexts. Emphasis will be placed on building writing skills in literary criticism and analyzing literary devices and themes.

Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5
Exclusions: EAS284H1 or EAS309H1 or EAS334H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CHI411H5 • Theory and Practice in English/Chinese Translation

This course is an introduction to the major theories, methods and techniques involved in translating from English into Chinese. The course focuses on practical training for novice translators. Through practice, students will familiarize themselves with the translation process and develop a variety of translation skills and strategies. Students will discuss and reflect upon issues encountered during translation and develop decision-making ability to deal with translation challenges. This course provides a solid foundation for students to continue their studies in translation at the advanced level.


Prerequisites: CHI211H5 and CHI212H5
Exclusions: ECTB61H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN101H5 • An Introduction to Cinema Studies

Introduction to film analysis, concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Exclusions: INI115Y1 or NEW115Y1 or VIC115Y1 or ERI201H5 or ERI202H5 or CIN202H5 or CIN205Y5 or CIN105H1 or ENGB70H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN102H5 • Modernity and the Moving Image

Looking at a few periods of intense technological change—for example, with the invention of photography, and the introduction of sound, of colour, of television—we will consider the ways in which artists, filmmakers, studios, and media conglomerates have responded to such changes and to accompanying ideas about the role that moving technology plays in our conception of history and the future.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN203H5 • The Films of Alfred Hitchcock

The establishment of film as a serious art form is coincident with the earliest critical writing on Alfred Hitchcock that emerged in the 1950s. Since then, Hitchcock has remained one of the most important filmmakers of all time, spawning not only a massive body of critical scholarship but also legions of imitators. This course will serve as an introduction to both the films (such as Psycho and North by Northwest) and related issues: questions of suspense, authorship, morality, and spectatorship.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 or CIN202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN204H5 • The Films of Martin Scorsese

This course will examine the films of Martin Scorsese, one of the most influential figures in the history of cinema. Scorsese's films will be understood in relation to questions about imitation and originality, genre, violence, male hysteria, and also as meditations on the history of film itself.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 or CIN202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN205H5 • Canadian Auteurs

This course will offer a comparative study of a selection of major contemporary Canadian filmmakers, including Denys Arcand, Atom Egoyan, David Cronenberg, Sara Polley, Denis Villeneuve, Ruba Nadda, Denis Côté, Guy Maddin, Michael Snow, and Joyce Wieland.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 or CIN202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN206H5 • Auteurs

This course will look closely at the work of a single director. Emphasis will be given to the aesthetic, historical, cultural, and philosophical contexts that inform the director's work. We will also tend closely to the style and central preoccupations of the director under examination.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN207H5 • East Asian Cinema

This course is an introduction to East Asian cinema from the 1960s to the present, including films from Hong Kong, Taiwan, China, Japan, and Korea. With an emphasis on formal aesthetic analysis of short and feature-length films, we will examine film waves, genres, film festivals, and interconnected film industries. Throughout the course, we will consider not only the production, exhibition, and reception spaces of East Asian cinema but also critically examine its definitions and borders.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN208H5 • The Films of Abbas Kiarostami: Being and Movement

This course will survey the work of the Iranian filmmaker, Abbas Kiarostami, and will do so with an especial interest in the way that Kiarostami’s films raise important questions about tradition, judgment, and the fluidity of self and world.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN210H5 • Contemporary Southeast Asian Cinemas

This course is an introduction to contemporary Southeast Asian cinemas from the 2000s to the present. Since the turn of the millennium, the cinematic innovation of Southeast Asia has been aided by an increase in productive interaction and transnational modes of collaborations and co-productions. These waves of cinema augur new possibilities for considering cross-cultural, cross-boundary ways of being, seeing and knowing that can challenge formulaic and essentialist understandings of the region. Through formal aesthetic analysis of short and feature-length films, and the study of Asia-based and international institutions of cinema, we will examine the multifarious potential of contemporary Southeast Asian in spurring the rethinking of the histories, concepts, and borders of the region.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN215H5 • Bollywood in Context

India has arguably the most popular and prolific film industry in the world. This course contextualizes the relatively recent 'Bollywood' phenomenon within the history of Indian commercial cinema and key aspects of modern Indian culture, emphasizing the popular cinema's role in constructing historically changing ideas of national and gendered identity. It also challenges the assumptions of film theories developed in relation to Hollywood or European cinema by introducing film theory concepts that address South Asian image-cultures (such as darshan, frontality, melodrama, and interruption).

Exclusions: VCC390H5 - Topic: Bollywood, CIN302H5
Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) and (VCC101H5 or VCC201H5)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN250H5 • Introduction to the Fundamentals of Cinematic Language

This hands-on studio-based course will examine fundamentals of cinematic language and production. Students will work individually and in teams to create a series of works that focus on aesthetics and skill development. 24L, 12T, 24P


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN290H5 • Topics in Cinema Studies

The course may have a historical, genre, theoretical, auteur, or other focus. See the Department of Visual Studies website at www.utm.utoronto.ca/dvs for the current topic.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN301H5 • Topics in Cinema Studies

The course may have a historical, genre, theoretical, auteur, or other focus. Students should contact the program director for the current topic.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) or at least 1.0 credits in courses that count toward Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN302H5 • Topics in Cinema Studies

The course may have a historical, genre, theoretical, auteur, or other focus. Students should contact the program director for the current topic.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) or at least 1.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN303H5 • Global Auteurs

This course is devoted to three major international filmmakers: Michael Haneke (Austria), Olivier Assayas (France), and Hou Hsiao-Hsien (Taiwan). While different in many important respects, these filmmakers are nevertheless linked by their tendency to make international films that are themselves meditations on national identity in an increasingly globalized world. Screenings will include Caché, Code Unknown, Carlos, Demonlover, The Flight of the Red Balloon, and Goodbye South, Goodbye, to name just a few.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) or (VCC101H5 or VCC201H5)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN304H5 • The Violent Image

It is commonly believed that violent images produce violent, or desensitized people. In this class, we will examine the multiple forms of violence in film, television, and videogames as well as the variety of discourses about violence and images. Rather than confirming the moral logic of condemnation of the violent image, we will ask instead what good a violent image might do.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5 or CIN205Y5) or at least 1.0 credit in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN305H5 • Taiwan New Wave in Our Time

The film In Our Time (1982), which combined short works by four directors (Edward Yang, Jim Tao, Ke Yizheng, and Zhang Yi), is regarded as the beginning of Taiwan New Cinema, generally considered to have ended in the late 1980s. Figures such as Hou Hsiao Hsien, Wang Tung, Chu Tien-wen, Wu Nien-Jen, Hung Hung, Hsiao Yeh, Tsai Chin, and Sylvia Chang played key roles, as directors, screenwriters, producers, and/or actors. From examining films within the era to their impact on contemporary global cinema, this course asks: how may a film be transnationally and transgenerationally re-animated for shifting eras and constellations of viewers? This course speculates that the time of the Taiwan New Wave is still beckoning, even from beyond the contested shores of Taiwan. 24L, 24P

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 or at least 1.0 credit in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN306H5 • The Comedic Image

Comedies routinely depend on the performance of the unthinkable in the ordinary. Our laughter follows from the saying or doing of the unsayable and the undoable. Comedy is in this way both a form of bad manners and also a uniquely philosophical genre, insofar as saying the unsayable means that we are able to recognize more than what we see or typically say. This course will survey the history of comedy and its relation to thought, perception, and social values.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) or at least 1.0 credits in courses that count toward the Cinema Studies minor.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN307H5 • Movement

Since the advent of cinema, filmmakers and film theorists have repeatedly attempted to define film as a unique art form on the basis of its most defining characteristic: movement. Painters can represent movement, but film is movement itself. Not surprisingly, many filmmakers who are recognized as significant artists are most easily identified by the distinctive style of their camera movement. This class will be devoted to a consideration of the nature, meaning, and styles of movement in film.

Recommended Preparation: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) or (VCC101H5 or VCC201H5)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN308H5 • East and Southeast Asian Cinemas of Migration

Migration, voluntary and involuntary, has intensified in an unprecedented manner in recent history. More than ever, it is critical to examine forms of proximity, hospitality, and regionality. Including films by migrants, films about the migrant experience, and the migratory routes of cinema itself, this course addresses the ethics, politics, and praxis of mobility and displacement. How, through East and Southeast Asian cinemas, could we envision counter-bodies and counter-strategies with which we may collectively imagine and inhabit the world? 24L, 24P

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 or at least 1.0 credit in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN309H5 • Colour and the Moving image

Considering philosophical, scientific, and historical discourses about colour, this course explores a variety of ways of analyzing colour style in film and video art. As we begin to come to terms with the perceptual instability of colour as a positive phenomenon, we will consider how and why dominant histories of film style have been written, especially as the taming of colour has been central to an ongoing categorical distinction between narrative cinema and the avant-garde, morality and hedonism.

Exclusions: CIN401H5 (Winter 2021)
Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 and at least 1.0 credit in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN310H5 • Melodrama

Film and Televisual melodramas regularly enact a conflict between personal desire and social expectation. This course will cover a range of films and television melodramas and consider the social contexts in which these works emerge, and often as critiques of the very cultures to which they belong or reject. 24L, 36P

Exclusions: CIN301H5 Topics course Melodrama.
Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5 and at least 1.0 credit in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/36P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN315H5 • From Script to Screen

This is a screenwriting course where students will be introduced to key narrative tools, scriptwriting conventions and components so they can develop an understanding and appreciation of the process from script to screen. From a comparative analysis of screenplays and completed short and feature films with varying budgets in the global cinema landscape, students will learn to use freely available specialized software to craft their own short film materials, including logline, synopsis, treatment, and screenplay.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN317H5 • Production: Independent Cinema

What can the title cards and credits of a film tell us about its journey to the screen? Outside of the studio system model adopted in various countries, there are established pathways and structures for the development, financing, production, sales, distribution and exhibition of independent cinema. This class asks how, from idea to completion, an independent film is able to find funding and reach an international audience. Focusing on the transnational ecosystems that sustain the passage of independent cinema around the world, we will examine case studies of films from Asia, Europe and North America.

Recommended Preparation: CIN101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their third year or beyond to work on the research project of a professor in Cinema Studies in return for 399Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, enhance their research skills, and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter session on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN400H5 • Topics in Cinema Studies

The course may have a historical, genre, theoretical, auteur, or other focus. Students should contact the Department for the current topic.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or at least 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN401H5 • Topics in Cinema Studies

The course may have a historical, genre, theoretical, auteur, or other focus. Students should contact the Department for the current topic.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or at least 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN402H5 • Avant-Garde Film and Video

This course will look at alternative forms of filmmaking and television production. If there is a defining feature of avant-garde film and video, it is a general resistance to the thematic and stylistic norms of mainstream production and popular culture as way of seeing for all. Thus, in this course, we will be looking at both highly personal and sometimes autobiographical works of art.

Prerequisites: (CIN101H5 or CIN202H5) and 1.0 credits at the 300 level in CIN or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN403H5 • Queerscapes, Screenscapes, Escapes: Gender and Sexuality Across East and Southeast Asian Cinemas

"Queerness is not yet here." José Esteban Muñoz begins Cruising Utopia with the provocation that queerness is a mode of desire that allows for an escape from the conditions of the present. How does queer studies contribute to the building of and the continued hope for a more just world? Through cinema, theory, and philosophy, this course makes the claim that investigating queerness in the world marks a critical move away from restrictive modes of identification and holds open life's horizons of possibility. Course texts emphasize queer cinemas of Asia and their transnational connections. 24S, 24P

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or at least 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN404H5 • Film Noir and the Problem of Style

By way of an introduction to some of the key instances of film noir, this course is concerned with what we will call the paradox of style; namely, that style can indicate both what is specific and also what is general, what is unique and what is repeatable. We will look at the way in which this paradox is amplified by issues of gender, genre, fashion, and power that seem to concern so many films in this tradition. 24S, 30P

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or at least 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.
Exclusions: CIN401H5 topics course "Film Noir and the Problem of Style".

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 30P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN405H5 • Cinema and Emotion

This interdisciplinary course looks at such difficult emotions as shame, jealousy, forgiveness, and love, and how film complicates our understanding of them. 24S, 30P

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or at least 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.
Exclusions: CIN401H5 topic: Difficult Emotions, Moving Images

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 30P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN408H5 • Potential Cinema: Theories, Visions, and Practices of Decoloniality from East and Southeast Asia

Inspired by Ariella Aïsha Azoulay's Potential History: Unlearning Imperialism, this course investigates films from East and Southeast Asia and considers the ways in which we might recognize theories, visions, and practices that might constitute "cinemas of decoloniality." In this course, we will look to filmmakers' aesthetic engagement with archival and imagined time and the collision of pasts, presents, and futures in order to consider how contentious histories of memory and forgetting can have effects on the politics of the present. How, through and with cinema, could there be space not only to retell and reframe histories of coloniality and decolonization but also to experience and practice the potential decolonization of ways of being, seeing, and thinking?

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 or a minimum 2.0 credits in courses that count towards Cinema Studies programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN410H5 • Creating Mobile Cinemas

This class will introduce students to low-budget aesthetic approaches to cinema across fiction and documentary genres. The class will involve a hybrid of cinema research and creation. During the first half of the semester, we will study a selection of feature-length works and shorts. The second half of the semester will be dedicated towards students creating 10-15 minute pieces of their own inspired by what they have studied.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 and 1.0 at the 300/400-level in CIN

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CIN430H5 • Making a Short Film

This is a production course that introduces students to the four stages of filmmaking: development, production, post production, and release. Through learning the practical aspects of filmmaking such as scriptwriting, budgeting, key crew positions, basic technical proficiency of equipment, and understanding the film festival circuit and online platform, students will make a 5-10 minute fiction short film. Equipment and funds will not be provided but students will be able to complete the assignments on a smartphone with recommendation of free video editing software.

Prerequisites: CIN101H5 and 1.0 credit at the 300/400-level in CIN

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA101H5 • Introduction to Classical Civilization

An introduction to ancient Greco-Roman civilization that highlights some of the most salient artistic, cultural, historical, and social achievements of these two societies.

Exclusions: CLA160H1 or CLAA04H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA201H5 • Latin and Greek in Scientific Terminology

The study of technical and scientific terms derived from Latin and Greek: word elements, formation, analysis. The course is designed to give students in any field of specialization a better grasp of the derivation and basic meaning of English words formed from Latin and Greek elements.

Exclusions: CLA201H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA204H5 • Introduction to Classical Mythology

A survey of the myths and legends of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean world in ancient art and literature. Consideration may also be given to their reception in modern art and literature and some modern theories of myth.

Exclusions: CLA204H1 or CLAB05H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA207H5 • Introduction to Greek and Roman Literature

This course provides an introduction to Greek and Roman literature. Detailed interpretations of key works from a variety of genres are complemented by discussions of more general issues like literacy levels, orality, literary rhetoric, performance contexts and intertextuality.

Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA220H5 • Introduction to Greek and Roman Archaeology

This course introduces students to archaeology in the ancient Mediterranean, covering key archaeological methods and material from the Greek Bronze Age through the Roman Empire. Students develop essential skills to recognize and analyze ancient material culture.

Exclusions: CLA210H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA230H5 • Introduction to Greek History

An introduction to the diverse history of the Greek world, tracing mainly political but also social developments from the Bronze Age of the mid-second millennium BCE to the first century CE.

Exclusions: CLA230H1 or CLAB05H3
Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA231H5 • Introduction to Roman History

An introduction to the history of Rome, focusing mainly on its political and military history but also tracing the most salient social and cultural developments, from its inconspicuous beginnings in the eighth century BCE to Rome's Mediterranean Empire in the imperial period and its dissolution in the sixth century CE.

Exclusions: CLA231H1 or CLAB06H3
Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA233H5 • Introduction to Roman Culture & Society

An introduction to the cultural and social history of ancient Rome and those living in the Roman world. Topics may vary from year to year but include daily life and demography, the Roman family, gender and sexuality, the Roman political system and the army, religion, Roman entertainments (the circus, gladiatorial games, the theatre), and Latin literature.

Exclusions: CLA233H1 or CLAB06H3
Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA234H5 • Ancient Science and Technology

A general introduction to early technology, its achievements and limitations, the origins and development of ancient science, including ancient medicine, and their interaction with philosophy.

Exclusions: CLA203H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA237H5 • Introduction to Greek Culture & Society

An introduction to the society and culture of the ancient Greek world and those who were in contact with it. Topics may vary from year to year but include daily life and demography, social customs, gender and sexuality, literature, art, as well as religion and religious festivals (such as processions, theatrical performances and athletic competitions such as the Olympic Games).

Exclusions: CLA232H1 or CLAB05H3
Recommended Preparation: CLA101H5 or CLA204H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early February. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Note:
This course may be substituted for 1.0 credits at the 300+ level.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 4.0 and not more than 9.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA300H5 • Greek Tragedy and Comedy

Greek drama from the origins of tragedy in the sixth century B.C. to New Comedy, with close study of selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander, and attention to Aristotle's Poetics.

Exclusions: CLA382H1 or CLA383H1 or CLAC01H3
Recommended Preparation: CLA204H5 or CLA237H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA301H5 • Greek Epic

The Iliad and the Odyssey, with comparative study of related texts.

Prerequisites: CLA204H5 or CLA230H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA236H1 or CLAC11H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA302H5 • Roman Epic

The Aeneid of Virgil and/or other Roman epics with comparative study of related texts.

Prerequisites: CLA204H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA236H1 or CLAC11H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA303H5 • The Ancient Novel

The human and social climate in which prose fiction arose; the Greek romances of love and adventure (Heliodorus, Longus, Chariton), and the more ironical and socially conscious works of the Roman writers (Petronius, The Satyricon, and Apuleius, The Golden Ass).

Prerequisites: CLA204H5 or CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA303H1 or CLAC12H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA307H5 • Greek and Roman Lyric Poetry

This course discusses Greek and Roman lyric poetry in its wider literary, cultural and political contexts. Poets who will be discussed include, among others, Sappho, Theocritus, Catullus and Horace. Some of the poems featured in this course belong to the best and most beautiful literature written in Graeco-Roman antiquity.

Prerequisites: CLA207H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA308H5 • Religion in the Ancient Greek World

A study of the religious cults and forms of worship current in the ancient Greek world. The course will consider religion in the ancient Greek city-states, but attention will also be paid to the so-called 'mystery religions', Greek beliefs about the afterlife, and intellectual reflection on religion in Greek literature.

Prerequisites: Prerequisite for CLA students: (CLA204H5 or CLA230H5 or CLA237H5) and for RLG students: any pertinent RLG course at the 200+ level.
Exclusions: CLA308H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA310H5 • Religion in the Roman Empire

A close study of the religious cults and forms of worship current in the Roman Empire during the first four centuries C.E. The course will concentrate on the so-called 'pagan' cults, but their interaction with Jews and the early Christians, as well as the rise of Christianity, will also be considered. Attention will also be paid to the imperial cult ("emperor worship"); the so-called 'mystery religions' and 'oriental religions'; the diversity of local religion across the empire; oracles, private religiosity and intellectual reflection on religion in the ancient Greek and Roman writers.

Prerequisites: Prerequisite for CLA students: (CLA231H5 or CLA233H5) and for RLG students: any pertinent RLG course at the 200+ level.
Exclusions: CLA310H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA319H5 • Women and Gender in Antiquity

A study of gender in the ancient Mediterranean, with a focus on female and male sexuality and socialization; their economic, religious, and political roles; and aspects of daily life.

Prerequisites: CLA204H5 or CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA219H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA320H5 • The Etruscans

A close study of the history, culture, society, religion, art and archaeology of the Etruscans (1000–100 BCE) and of their contacts with Greek and Roman society and culture.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA391H5 (Fall 2022)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA337H5 • Pompeii and Herculaneum: Everyday Life and Death in Roman Cities

Focusing on Roman Pompeii and Herculaneum, this course studies the experiences of townspeople: the freeborn (male and female), freed persons, and slaves; the demography of a Roman town and its public infrastructure; the interior design of Roman houses; local politics; leisure activities; economy; and religious beliefs and funerary practices.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA391H5 (Winter 2019)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA359H5 • The Persian Empire: 559-331 BCE

This course offers an examination of the history and culture of the first multicultural superstate of the ancient world, the Achaemenid Empire. Through a close analysis of ancient sources, this course not only investigates governmental structures but also the daily life in the Eastern Mediterranean from the sixth to the fourth centuries BCE.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: NMC349H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA360H5 • Early Greece

This course offers an exploration into the early Greek world, tracing political, economical, and social developments from a world of local rulers in the second millennium BCE until the Persian Wars in the early fifth century BCE. An in-depth study of the many forms of available ancient sources will create a vivid picture of early Greek communities, of state organization, and society.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA362H1 or CLA363H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA361H5 • Classical Greece

A close study of the Greek Mediterranean world during the period, which already in antiquity, was described as 'Classical'. Through an in-depth study of ancient sources, this course explores the political, economic, social, religious and cultural developments of the Greek states in the time period from the Persian Wars in the early 5th century to the rise of Macedon in the second half of the fourth century BCE.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA335H5 or CLA363H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA362H5 • Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World

This course offers an in-depth study of the Hellenistic World from the reign of Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE to a Greek world under Roman dominance in the first century CE, spanning geographically from the Mediterranean basin via the Levant and Mesopotamia to modern-day Afghanistan. A close examination of different types of ancient sources will trace the political, cultural, economic and social developments of kings, regions and cities that shaped this period.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA347H5, CLA64H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA365H5 • Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean

This course explores questions of trade and exchange in the ancient Mediterranean. A close study of ancient primary material examines aspects of the ancient economy, trade goods, ships and shipwrecks, ports and harbours, and cross-cultural interaction.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA231H5 or CLA233H5 or CLA237H5
Exclusions: CLA372H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA367H5 • The Roman Republic

A survey of the salient political, constitutional, social, economic, military, religious, and cultural developments in the Roman Republic, from the late sixth century to the final decades of the first century BC.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA367H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA368H5 • Augustus and the Julio-Claudians

A survey of the salient political, constitutional, social, economic, military, religious and cultural developments in the Roman Empire in the age of Augustus and during the reigns of the Julio-Claudian emperors (ca. 44 BCE- 68CE).

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA368H1
Recommended Preparation: CLA367H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA369H5 • The High Roman Empire, 68-305 CE

A survey of the salient political, constitutional, social, economic, military, religious and cultural developments in the Roman Empire, from the 'year of the four emperors' (68 CE) to the fourth century CE.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA369H1
Recommended Preparation: CLA368H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA370H5 • Late Antiquity

A survey of the salient political, constitutional, social, economic, military, religious and cultural developments in the Roman Empire from the fourth century to the age of Justinian.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5
Exclusions: CLA378H1
Recommended Preparation: CLA369H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA390H5 • Topics in Greek History & Culture

A detailed study of a topic of Greek history, literature, or material culture. Topics will vary from year to year. See Department of Historical Studies web site at https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/historical-studies/students/courses/topic-c… for more details.

Prerequisites: CLA230H5 or CLA237H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA391H5 • Topics in Roman History & Culture

A detailed study of a topic of Roman history, literature, or material culture. Topics will vary from year to year. See Department of Historical Studies web site at https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/historical-studies/students/courses/topic-c… for more details.

Prerequisites: CLA231H5 or CLA233H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA395H5 • Topics in Classics

An in-depth examination of historical issues. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See Department of Historical Studies web site at https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/historical-studies/students/courses/topic-c… for more details.

Prerequisites: At least 0.5 200 level credits in Classical Civilization.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

For senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods, this course offers an opportunity to work on the research project of a professor. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Project descriptions for the following fall-winter session are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 8.0, and not more than 10.0, credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA404H5 • Advanced Topics in Classics

A critical exploration of selected topics of Greek or Roman history, literature, philosophy, or material culture. Topics will vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: At least 2.5 credits in Classics, including at least 1.5 credits at the 300 level.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA497Y5 • Independent Reading

Student-initiated project of reading and research, supervised by a member of the Department. Primarily intended for students in a Major program. After obtaining a supervisor, a student must apply to the Department of Historical Studies. A maximum of 1.0 credit in a reading course is permitted.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA499H5 • Independent Reading

Student-initiated project of reading and research, supervised by a member of the Department. Primarily intended for Majors. After obtaining a supervisor, a student must apply to the Department of Historical Studies. A maximum of two reading courses, amounting to 1.0 credit, is permitted.

Prerequisites: At least 2.5 credits in Classics, including at least 1.5 credits at the 300 level.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

CLA499Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

For senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods, this course offers an opportunity to work on the research project of a professor. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Project descriptions for the following fall-winter session are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 8.0, and not more than 10.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE121H5 • Traditions of Theatre and Drama

An introductory survey of the forms and history of world drama from the classical period to the nineteenth century in its performance context. May include later works influenced by historical forms and one or more plays in the Theatre Erindale schedule of production. May include a research performance component. This course is also listed as ENG121H5.

Exclusions: DRM100Y1 or ENG125Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE122H5 • Modern and Contemporary Theatre and Drama

An introductory survey of the forms and history of world drama from the late nineteenth century to the present in its performance context. May include film adaptations and one or more plays in the Theatre Erindale schedule of productions. May include a research performance component. This course is also listed as ENG122H5.

Exclusions: DRM100Y1 or ENG125Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE200H5 • Canadian Theatre History

A survey of the history of theatre in Canada, with particular emphasis on developments since the mid-twentieth century.

Prerequisites: DRE/ENG121H5 and ENG122H5, or permission of the U of T Mississauga program director.
Exclusions: DRM268H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE201H5 • Acting

A practical introduction to the art and craft of performance, intended for students with little or no previous experience or training. The course uses a range of acting exercises to teach critical thinking, active listening, specificity of action, intention of thought, and team building. Students will engage in text analysis, collective creation, storytelling, physical and vocal exercises, and character development, in the process cultivating skills transferable to their chosen career path. This course is ideally suited for any student seeking to enhance their interpersonal and presentation skills.

Exclusions: DRS121H5 or DRS122H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE221Y5 • Shakespeare

A study of about twelve plays by Shakespeare, representing the different periods of his career and the different genres he worked in (comedy, history, tragedy). Such plays as: Romeo and Juliet; A Midsummer Night's Dream; Richard II; Henry IV, parts I and II; Henry V; Twelfth Night; Measure for Measure; Hamlet; King Lear; Antony and Cleopatra; The Tempest. The course provides an in-depth theatre-historical and practical introduction to Shakespeare's work and gives students the opportunity to engage with a wide range of approaches to the staging of his plays.

Prerequisites: DRE121H5 or ENG121H5, and DRE122H5 or ENG122H5 Students who do not meet the prerequisite may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG220Y5 or DRE224H5 or DRE226H5 or DRE370H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 48L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE222H5 • The Performance Text

An introduction to the techniques of dramaturgical analysis, through the study of a range of texts to which students might be exposed as theatre practitioners and audience members. Focus will be on the relationship between the performance event and its associated written text. Examples will emphasize modern and contemporary drama, as well as a range of styles, and will include one or more Theatre Erindale productions, and other appropriate productions, as well as a practical workshop component.

Prerequisites: (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5) or permission of U of T Mississauga program director
Exclusions: DRE240H5 or DRE242H5 or DRE244H5 or DRE246H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE224H5 • Introduction to Shakespeare

This course introduces students to Shakespeare. Lectures equip them with historical knowledge about literature, politics, and the theatre in Shakespeare's time. Tutorials help them to grapple with Shakespeare's language, versification, and stagecraft. By the end of the course students will have a new framework within which to understand - and interrogate - the enduring power of Shakespeare's work.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG220Y5 or DRE221Y5 or ENG223H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE226H5 • Shakespeare in the Theatre

This course introduces students to Shakespeare’s plays as works of theatre. We will study the spaces and performance practices for which these texts were originally written and explore how subsequent generations of theatre makers approached, adapted, and repurposed them for different performance venues and styles, and from different aesthetic, cultural, and political perspectives, from the seventeenth century to our own time, in Britain, North America, and beyond the English-speaking world. The course will include screenings of select landmark productions.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5).
Exclusions: DRE221Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Project descriptions for the following fall-winter session are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: 4.0 credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE305H5 • Studies in Indigenous Performance

Topic for this course vary from year to year, depending on faculty research interests. The course may cover such matters as interdisciplinary approaches to Indigenous storytelling in experimental film, new media, digital arts and performance, including community collaboration, public spaces, archival or historical content, participatory performance, and decentralized theatre. It may include a practical workshop component and attending a rehearsal for an Indigenous lead production in Toronto.

Prerequisites: 4.0 full credits, including (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5) or permission of the UTM program director
Recommended Preparation: DRE200H5 and DRE222H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE342H5 • Studies in Twentieth Century Performance Styles

A seminar on a topic chosen by the instructor, having a particular focus on twentieth century theories of performance. Includes optional practical workshop component.

Prerequisites: 4.0 full credits, including DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5; or permission of the UTM program director.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE344H5 • Studies in Theatre and Drama 1

Topic varies from year to year, depending on faculty research interests.

Prerequisites: 4.0 full credits, including DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5; or permission of the UTM program director.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE346H5 • Studies in Theatre and Drama 2

Topic varies from year to year, depending on faculty research interests.

Prerequisites: 4.0 full credits, including DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5; or permission of the UTM program director.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE347H5 • Studies in Theatre and Drama 3

Topic varies from year to year, depending on faculty research interests.

Prerequisites: 4.0 full credits, including DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5; or permission of the UTM program director.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE348H5 • Production Dramaturgy

Plays from the Western theatrical tradition in contemporary productions.

Prerequisites: (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5) and (DRE200H5 or DRE220H5) and DRE222H5 or permission of the U of T Mississauga program director.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE352H5 • Stage to Screen

A theoretical and historical study of the relationship between live and recorded media, with special consideration of the translation/adaption from theatrical production to film and television production. Discussion will focus on case studies. Includes optional practical workshop component.

Prerequisites: 4.0 full credits, including DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5; or permission of the UTM program director.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE356H5 • Theory of Drama

A study of theories of drama, theatre and performance, with a special emphasis on semiotics. Topics will include the relationship between theatre and other modes of social interaction (the fashion show, the political convention), theatre and other performing arts, and theatre/drama as a literary genre. May include one or more Theatre Erindale and other productions in the syllabus.

Prerequisites: 4.0 full credits, including DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5; or permission of the UTM program director.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE358H5 • The Audience and the Theatre

A theoretical and historical examination of the theatrical performance with a focus on the role of the audience. Topics will include the shifting relationship with performers, both collaborative and manipulative, a reflection on what makes theatre audiences different from other audiences, and what precisely happens at various stages of the playgoing experience. The second part of the semester will be devoted to a series of historical case studies, ranging from ancient Greece through Shakespearian England to 17th-century Spain and 20th-century Germany.

Prerequisites: 4.0 full credits, including DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5; or permission of the UTM program director.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE360H5 • Developmental Dramaturgy

A theoretical, historical, and practical study of the process of developmental dramaturgy. The course will include a survey and analysis of historical and contemporary interpretations of the role of dramaturgy in the creation of new work. Students will also participate in the practical application of dramaturgical strategies and techniques.

Prerequisites: (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5) and (DRE200H5 or DRE220H5) and DRE222H5

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE362H5 • Playwriting

An introduction to the art and craft of writing for the stage. Through a variety of practical exercises, students will be encouraged to explore the unique properties of the theatrical environment. Topics for investigation will include general issues (such as language, plot structure, characterization, metaphor, and symbolism, etc.) as well as issues specific to the theatrical context (such as theatrical time and space, movement, engagement with an audience, relationship to other theatre practitioners, etc.). The class will involve writing in and out of class, as well as exercises in effective and constructive critique of one another's work.

Prerequisites: [4.0 full credits, including (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5)] or permission of instructor. In some years, a portfolio submission will be required. Contact the undergraduate advisor for details.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE363H5 • Workshop in Playwriting

This course is a continued exploration in writing for the stage for students who have already written one act or solo plays. Participant playwrights will complete a full-length play, incorporate complex structures and anti-structure, and advance their voices and skills as playwrights. The class will workshop scenes and prepare staged readings of participant work. A major focus of this course will be processes of development and revision while working with directors, actors, dramaturgs, and other collaborators.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 4.0 credits, including (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5  or ENG122H5) and DRE362H5 and permission of instructor. A portfolio submission may be required at the instructor’s discretion, contact the undergraduate advisor for portfolio requirements and submission deadlines.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE366H5 • Women in Theatre

Topics in the history of women in English-language theatre. Topics will vary from year to year, depending on available faculty. May include a practical workshop component.

Prerequisites: 4.0 full credits, including DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5; or permission of the UTM program director.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE370H5 • Exploring Shakespeare in Performance

In this course, students will be introduced to contemporary theatrical approaches to the most canonical of dramatists. Through selected theoretical readings, interviews, practical exercises, and screenings of recent productions, we will explore tensions between reverential and radical treatments of the Shakespearean text, including topics such as the politics of casting, the role of the director, and the authority of the actor. The course will ask what it means to stage Shakespeare now and will equip students to develop their own and conceptual and theatrical responses to that question.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits, including (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5) and DRE226H5.
Exclusions: DRE221Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE380H5 • Repertory Theatre in Practice: The Shaw Festival

A study of the role of repertory theatre in the historical and current development of dramatic literature and performance practices, held-on-site at the Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario. Students will attend productions and lectures, interview actors, directors, designers, and administrators, and collaborate on a staged reading with the assistance of company members. Topics may include the performance history of plays by Shaw, Chekhov, Ibsen, Wilde, and other playwrights within the Festival's mandate, the analysis of production elements from the perspectives of directors, actors, and designers, and the relevance of "classical" drama for the modern world. There is a nonrefundable fee associated with this course beyond tuition, for which the accepted students are responsible.

Prerequisites: 6.0 credits, including DRE121H5 and DRE122H5 and DRE200H5, and DRE222H5 or approved equivalent courses.
Recommended Preparation: Any DRE course on the 300- or 400-level and ENG340H5 and ENG341H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE392H5 • Independent Study 1

An independent project in theatre and drama studies, chosen by the student and supervised by a member of the faculty. The form of the project will be determined in consultation with the supervisor. A written proposal, signed by the supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the Program Director by May 15 if an "F" course, by November 1 if an "S" course. Proposal forms are available from the Undergraduate Advisor. Independent Study courses may not be taken simultaneously.

Prerequisites: Permission of the U of T Mississauga program director, and completion of three DRM/DRE/DRS credits.
Exclusions: DRM390Y5 or DRE390Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE394H5 • Independent Study 2

An independent project in theatre and drama studies, chosen by the student and supervised by a member of the faculty. The form of the project will be determined in consultation with the supervisor. A written proposal, signed by the supervisor, must be submitted for approval to the Program Director by May 15 if an "F" course, by November 1 if an "S" course. Proposal forms are available from the Undergraduate Advisor. Independent Study courses may not be taken simultaneously.

Prerequisites: Permission of the U of T Mississauga program director, and completion of three DRM/DRE/DRS credits.
Exclusions: DRM390Y5 or DRE390Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

For senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods, this course offers an opportunity to work on the research project of a professor. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Project descriptions for the following fall-winter session are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE405H5 • Topics in Indigenous Performance

This senior research and creation seminar will explore topics in contemporary Indigenous performance. These topics will vary with faculty research interests; course may cover such matters as intergenerational cross-cultural collaboration, Anishinaabe star and land knowledge, working with culturally-codified objects, contextualizing projects in non-institutional spaces, international inter-indigenous productions, community outreach, and Indigenous feminisms and futurisms. The course may include a practical workshop component or a capstone research or performance project.

Prerequisites: 9 credits including (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5) and either (DRE200H5 or DRE222H5). Students who do not meet the prerequisite may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE420H5 • Senior Seminar 1

A senior research seminar in Theatre and Performance. Topic will vary with instructor.

Prerequisites: 9 credits, including (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5) and (DRE200H5 or DRE222H5) or permission of the U of T Mississauga program director

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE422H5 • Senior Seminar II

A senior research seminar in Theatre and Performance. Topic will vary with instructor.

Prerequisites: 9 credits, including (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5) and (DRE200H5 or DRE222H5); or permission of the U of T Mississauga program director

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRE463H5 • Senior Seminar III

A senior research seminar in performance and popular culture. Topic will vary with instructor.

Prerequisites: 9 credits, including (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5) and (DRE200H5 or DRE222H5); or permission of the U of T Mississauga program director

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS121H5 • Acting 1

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) This course will introduce the elements of practical Vocal, Physical, Textual, and Improvisational training for the novice actor, together with an Introduction to Theatre Organization, with an emphasis on releasing the natural impulse. In addition, the student will spend a minimum of 3 hours per week (averaged) in Stagecraft Labs gaining basic backstage and front-of-house skills, and in production-related duties. Typical production tasks are concentrated in 3- to 9-week periods and may include evenings and/or Saturdays.

Corequisites: DRE121H5 or ENG121H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 108P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS122H5 • Acting 2

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) The continuation of Acting 1. Stagecraft Labs are replaced, outside class hours, by a minimum of 3 hours per week (average) of production-related duties over the term.

Prerequisites: DRS121H5 and (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5)
Corequisites: DRE122H5 or ENG122H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 108P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS221H5 • Acting 3

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Half of this course will continue and build upon the work begun in first year in Voice, Text, and Movement. The other half will be an Introduction to Scene Study, including character analysis for the actor, with realistic material from the Canadian and International repertoire. The student will be assigned a minimum of 75 hours of production-related duties outside class time over the year; typical tasks are concentrated in 3- to 9-week periods and may include evenings and/or Saturdays.

Prerequisites: At least 4.0 credits including DRS121H5 and DRS122H5 and (DRE121H5 or ENG121H5) and (DRE122H5 or ENG122H5)
Corequisites: At least one of DRE200H5 or DRE220H5 or DRE222H5 or DRE240H5 or DRE242H5 or DRE244H5 or DRE246H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 108P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS222H5 • Acting 4

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) The continuation of DRS221H5 Acting 3.

Prerequisites: DRS221H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 108P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS321H5 • Acting 5

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Vocal, Physical, and Interpretive Techniques for the developing actor now become more specialized. Unarmed Combat, Period Movement, Contact Improvisation, Ensemble Singing, Intermediate Voice, Professional Practice, and various classical and contemporary styles are included (components may vary with the availability of Guest Instructors). In addition, each student will be scheduled regularly for a half-hour Tutorial to work on acting problems in a one-on-one situation.

Prerequisites: DRS222H5 and (DRE200H5 or DRE220H5) and DRE222H5
Corequisites: DRS325H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 108P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS322H5 • Acting 6

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) The continuation of DRS321H5, Acting 5. Tutorials culminate in the major solo performance and dramaturgy exercise called the Junior Project.

Prerequisites: DRS321H5
Corequisites: DRS326H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 108P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS325H5 • Production 1

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) The student will be cast in a public production, involving 12-33 hours of rehearsal and performance evenings and Saturdays for up to 9 weeks of the term. (Note that, at this level, evening classes in other departments are not possible.)

Prerequisites: DRS222H5 and (DRE200H5 or DRS220H5) and DRE222H5
Corequisites: DRS321H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS326H5 • Production 2

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) The student will be cast in a second public production, involving 12-33 hours of rehearsal and performance evenings and Saturdays for up to 10 weeks of the term. (Note that, at this level, evening classes in other departments are not possible.)

Prerequisites: DRS325H5
Corequisites: DRS322H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS421H5 • Acting 7

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Work on Voice, Text, and Movement continues at an advanced level. Solo Singing, Senior Voice, Character Mask, Dance for Actors, and an Introduction to Sword are included (components may vary with the availability of Guest Instructors). Regular half-hour Tutorials continue, with emphasis on the development of individual audition material. Professional Practice classes include cold reading, mock auditions, and the realities of acting as a business. Styles include Acting for the Camera and other Media Workshops, as well as classes that could range from the Greeks to the Absurdists.

Prerequisites: DRS322H5 and DRS326H5 and 1.0 DRE credit at 300 level
Corequisites: DRS425H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 108P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS422H5 • Acting 8

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) The continuation of DRS421H5, Acting 7.

Prerequisites: DRS421H5
Corequisites: DRS426H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 108P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS425H5 • Production 3

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) The student will be cast in a third public production, involving 12-33 hours of rehearsal and performance evenings and Saturdays for up to 9 weeks of the term. (Note that, at this level, evening classes in other departments are not possible.)

Prerequisites: DRS326H5 and 1.0 DRE credit at 300 level.
Corequisites: DRS421H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 156P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DRS426H5 • Production 4

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) The student will be cast in a fourth public production, involving 12-33 hours of rehearsal and performance evenings and Saturdays for up to 10 weeks of the term. (Note that, at this level, evening classes in other departments are not possible.)

Prerequisites: DRS425H5
Corequisites: DRS422H5

Enrolment Limits: Studio courses are limited by audition to those in the Theatre and Drama Studies Program.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 156P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DTS201H5 • Introduction to Diaspora and Transnational Studies I

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of diaspora, with particular attention to questions of history, globalization, cultural production and the creative imagination. Material will be drawn from Toronto as well as from diasporic communities in other times and places.

Exclusions: DTS201H1 or DTSB01H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DTS202H5 • Introduction to Diaspora and Transnational Studies II

A continuation of DTS201H5. An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of diaspora, with particular attention to questions of history, globalization, cultural production and the creative imagination. Material will be drawn from Toronto as well as from diasporic communities in other times and places.

Exclusions: DTS200Y1 and DTS202H1 and DTSB02H3

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DTS301H5 • Topics in Diaspora and Transnational Studies

An examination of issues on Diaspora and Transnational Studies. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See Department of Historical Studies website at www.utm.utoronto.ca/historicalstudies for details.

Recommended Preparation: DTS201H5 or DTS202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

DTS401H5 • Advanced Topics in Diaspora and Transnational Studies

An in-depth examination of issues on Diaspora and Transnational Studies. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See Department of Historical Studies website at www.utm.utoronto.ca/historicalstudies for details.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS100H5 • Introduction to Education Studies

This course explores broad social and cultural issues in education. It will address questions about how we advance knowledge, who controls how and what we learn and what role education has in how societies are shaped, changed and reproduced. Students will evaluate the influence education can have on who we are, how we wish to live and what we aspire to as citizens in a global and digital community. This investigation will also consider how language, race, gender, class and culture intersect with teaching and learning.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS101H5 • Health and Education

This course serves as an introduction to theory and research in the related fields of health and education.  Students will learn to identify, address, and manage health-related risk in school environments by deepening their knowledge of holistic and brain-based theory. The course will explore health and wellness as a fundamental human right by addressing proactive approaches through the Determinants of Health and Developmental Assets Framework. Active research will include investigation of school-based policies and practices (e.g, the critique of a new fitness technology, examination of a school food and nutrition program, assessment of a school health campaign). 

Note:
As this is an introductory course to the topic, students are encouraged to take this course in their first or second year as preparation for EDS220H5 Equity and Diversity Studies and EDS388H5 – Internship in the Community. 


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS200H5 • Learning Through the Lifespan

This course focuses on the physical skills, cognitive abilities, and socioemotional experiences that shape an individual’s capacity to learn throughout the lifespan (i.e., infancy to late adulthood). It will address how learning is a lifelong process and how we are continually educating ourselves in different ways by incorporating strategies that best suit our lifespan stage. Critical research and theorists will be discussed to enhance the topics presented. Students are required to complete an 8-hour field experience, and obtain a valid vulnerable sector police check in advance of placement.

Exclusions: CTE100H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS210H5 • Communication and Conflict Resolution

This course focuses on principles and practices of conflict management and resolution, emphasizing interpersonal communication, including cross-cultural perspectives and communicating across different identities and worldviews, with emphasis on the relevance of these skills, principles and processes to teaching and learning.

Exclusions: CTE250H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS220H5 • Equity and Diversity in Education

This course focuses on raising awareness and sensitivity to equity and diversity issues facing teachers and students in diverse schools and cultural communities. It includes a field experience which entails observation of, and participation in, equity and diversity efforts in a community organization.

Exclusions: CTE200H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS250H5 • Indigenous Education

This course is open to all students from any discipline. Designed to increase opportunities to learn about education through a First Nation, Métis and Inuit perspective, the course will increase knowledge and awareness about pedagogies, learning approaches and educational experiences related to indigenous people living in Canada. In line with indigenous ways of knowing, this course will be structured with learning that involves reflecting on personal actions by looking at ways that indigenous models of education support social and community well-being.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS275H5 • Mass Media and Debunking the Myths of Education

This course explores prevailing myths about education. It invites students to critically examine consensus and controversy in the media while unpacking some of the research underpinning commonly held beliefs about curriculum, students, teachers, and education systems. The ability to interpret and assess the merits of news, fake news, research, and social media content is an increasingly important skill in a data rich world. This course will have a strong emphasis on critical reading, analysis and evaluation.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS285H5 • The Future of Ed Tech: Active Learning Classrooms and Artificial Intelligence

This course will explore research on emerging digital models, learning pods, platforms, apps and policies that seek to further customize, enhance and bring greater equity to education through technology. From the initiation of open courseware, to the inception of virtual reality, artificial intelligence, ALC classrooms, makerspaces and the “shared economy”, this course will foster a culture of digital innovation to investigate, accelerate, test and study new possibilities and advancements in the field of educational technology.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS291H5 • Black Education

This course investigates first-hand experiences and contributions of black students and teachers in the Canadian education system. Historical, systemic barriers to access will be studied along with current policy, practice and teaching pedagogies that aim to produce systems of education without oppression. By looking specifically at research focused on black schooling in Ontario, students will engage in policy analysis and assess current Afrocentric schooling models to assess effectiveness in eliminating educational inequality. Drawing on principles of equity and diversity, Afrofuturist scholarship will be emphasized and provide the framework that seeks to understand and investigate the past to better inform education’s future.


Recommended Preparation: EDS220H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS300H5 • Learning Design

This course provides an opportunity to study and practice the fundamental skills involved in designing learning opportunities, in schools and a variety of other settings. The skills required to organize and deliver engaging educational experiences, i.e., lesson and unit planning, will be practiced through a range of pedagogical and practical applications. A case studies approach will be taken, incorporating a field experience where students will apply their learning.

Exclusions: EDU310H5
Recommended Preparation: EDS200H5 (minimum 70%) and EDS210H5 (minimum 70%) and EDS220H5 (minimum 70%)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS310H5 • Education in a Global Context

This course invites students to explore, analyze and compare educational themes and topics within a global context. Using leading frameworks of transformative change, students develop knowledge, apply critical thinking, practice cultural proficiency and empathy as they conduct a comparative analysis of teaching and learning models in both an international and local setting.

Exclusions: EDU320H5
Recommended Preparation: EDS300H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS325H5 • Supplemental Instruction in Higher Education: Peer-Facilitated Study Groups

Looking for an opportunity to become a facilitator of small group learning in a subject discipline in which you have expertise? This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of Supplemental Instruction (SI) in higher education. Particular focus will be on the history and evolution of SI and the rationale for its use in different university contexts. EDS325H5 course participants will complete a mandatory internship that involves developing and delivering 8-10 peer led study sessions through the Facilitated Study Group (FSG) Program run by the Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre. Class work will embed relevant pedagogical tools, resources and research to support the development, delivery and success of FSG sessions. Current research investigating the impact of Supplemental Instruction on student success will also be explored. This is a closed course open only to those students who have successfully secured an FSG leader position with the Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre.

Exclusions: Previous Peer Facilitated Study Group experience in courses like FRE491H5 or FRE492H5 or LIN495Y5
Recommended Preparation: Open to all students, but the completion of EDS100H5 or other EDS courses or experience that has directly supported an understanding of teaching and learning are recommended but not required.

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS345H5 • Design Thinking Incubator: From Problem to Prototype

This course is open to all students on campus and provides an intellectual toolset for finding innovative solutions to complex problems. Students will learn to apply education theory to design thinking models in order to identify and solve real-world challenges facing their chosen discipline, whether in business, education, healthcare, etc. An iterative approach for testing, refining, and improving their idea will be used to create a working prototype of their proposed solution. This will demonstrate the idea's sustainability, scalability and viability, while taking into account ethical and legal implications.


Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS377H5 • Why the First Year of University Matters: The Impact of Peer Mentoring

This course explores contemporary issues in higher education with a focus on experiences, issues and challenges commonly encountered by undergraduate students during their first year of university. Interdisciplinary in its focus, topics of exploration include an examination of adult and student development theories, models of student engagement and an investigation into mindset, levels of persistence, habits of mind and personality characteristics that impact student success. An internship component is required. Students taking the course will assume a peer-mentoring role to apply and contextualize theories and skills learned in the course. This is a closed course open only to those students who have successfully secured a peer-mentoring position with the First Year Peer Mentoring program


Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities, Social Science
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS388H5 • Experiential Learning Opportunity within the Community

This internship is a minimum 100-hour experiential learning opportunity. The internship connects the student's subject specialization to aspects of the teaching/training development profession. It will integrate, extend, and deepen the learning experience as students begin to identify particular academic or professional insights. Prior to enrollment, internship proposals must be approved by the program coordinator. As part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process.

Exclusions: CTE388H5 or CTE388Y5
Recommended Preparation: EDS200H5 and EDS210H5 and EDS220H5 and EDS300H5 (may be taken as a co-requisite).

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

EDS399H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This ROP provides the opportunity for students to join a research team and assist on projects currently underway in Education Studies. The work will include preparing an impact study, conducting interviews and using a data-informed approach to investigate the impact of a range of programs and educational interventions. The work will involve conducting pre and post surveys, leading qualitative observational data collection, and producing an analysis. Project descriptions for participating faculty members for the following summer and fall/winter sessions are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG100H5 • Effective Writing

This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing, and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program.


Enrolment Limits: 100-level courses are designed to increase students’ skills in close reading, interpretation, and effective writing; emphasize the development of analytical and essay-writing skills; and build acquaintance with major literary forms and conventions that students need in more advanced courses. They are open to all students who have standing in no more than one full course in English.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG101H5 • How to Read Critically

This foundational course serves as an introduction to a wide range and variety of methods for literary and textual analysis, giving students a set of interpretive tools they can use to analyze texts in English classes and beyond. Emphasis will be on developing close, attentive reading skills as ways of thinking not just about, but through texts, and on deploying these skills effectively in essays and discussions. The class will draw on literary works from a variety of countries, centuries, genres, and media. We recommend that students considering a Specialist, Major, or Minor in English take this course.


Enrolment Limits: 100-level courses are designed to increase students’ skills in close reading, interpretation, and effective writing; emphasize the development of analytical and essay-writing skills; and build acquaintance with major literary forms and conventions that students need in more advanced courses. They are open to all students who have standing in no more than one full course in English.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG102H5 • How to Research Literature

This foundational course serves as an introduction to conducting research for English courses at the university level. Skills taught will be: reading and engaging with arguments about literature; incorporating the arguments of others into your own; locating and evaluating secondary sources; and conducting primary research. The class will draw on literary works from a variety of countries, centuries, genres, and media. The class will normally culminate in a longer research paper, developed over the course of the semester. We recommend that students considering a Specialist, Major, or a Minor in English take this course.


Enrolment Limits: 100-level courses are designed to increase students’ skills in close reading, interpretation, and effective writing; emphasize the development of analytical and essay-writing skills; and build acquaintance with major literary forms and conventions that students need in more advanced courses. They are open to all students who have standing in no more than one full course in English.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG103H5 • Literature and Medicine

It has never been more essential to learn from the history of disease: how we have perceived it and how we have written it. This course introduces students to the important narratives about health, epidemics, and medicine from both non-Western and Western traditions and provides conceptual foundations for ethical thinking about justice, health, and disability in both science and the arts. The survey will cover prose narrative, film, media, non-fiction, and poetry, and will encourage students to think between the past and the present in their analyses and creative projects. Lectures and discussions will emphasize the interlocking relationships between medicine, language, race, empire, and power.

Note:
100-level courses are designed to increase students’ skills in close reading, interpretation, and effective writing; emphasize the development of analytical and essay-writing skills; and build acquaintance with major literary forms and conventions that students need in more advanced courses. They are open to all students who have standing in no more than one full course in English.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG105H5 • Introduction to World Literatures

Students will learn about contemporary creative writing in English from around the world. The course will cover the work of some famous writers, such as Toni Morrison or J.M. Coetzee, and also new and emerging authors, from Canada to New Zealand to Nigeria.

Exclusions: ENG140Y5

Enrolment Limits: 100-level courses are designed to increase students’ skills in close reading, interpretation, and effective writing; emphasize the development of analytical and essay-writing skills; and build acquaintance with major literary forms and conventions that students need in more advanced courses. They are open to all students who have standing in no more than one full course in English.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG110H5 • Narrative

This course gives students skills for analyzing the stories that shape our world: traditional literary narratives such as ballads, romances, and novels, and also the kinds of stories we encounter in non-literary contexts such as journalism, movies, myths, jokes, legal judgments, travel writing, histories, songs, diaries, and biographies.

Exclusions: ENG110Y5

Enrolment Limits: 100-level courses are designed to increase students’ skills in close reading, interpretation, and effective writing; emphasize the development of analytical and essay-writing skills; and build acquaintance with major literary forms and conventions that students need in more advanced courses. They are open to all students who have standing in no more than one full course in English.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG121H5 • Traditions of Theatre and Drama

An introductory survey of the forms and history of world drama in its performance context from the classical period to the nineteenth century. May include later works influenced by historical forms and one or more plays in the Theatre Erindale schedule of production. May include a research performance component. This course is also listed as DRE121H5.

Exclusions: ENG125Y1

Enrolment Limits: 100-level courses are designed to increase students’ skills in close reading, interpretation, and effective writing; emphasize the development of analytical and essay-writing skills; and build acquaintance with major literary forms and conventions that students need in more advanced courses. They are open to all students who have standing in no more than one full course in English.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG122H5 • Modern and Contemporary Theatre and Drama

An introductory survey of the forms and history of world drama from the late nineteenth century to the present in its performance context. May include film adaptations and one or more plays in the Theatre Erindale schedule of productions. May include a research performance component. This course is also listed as DRE122H5.

Exclusions: ENG125Y1

Enrolment Limits: 100-level courses are designed to increase students’ skills in close reading, interpretation, and effective writing; emphasize the development of analytical and essay-writing skills; and build acquaintance with major literary forms and conventions that students need in more advanced courses. They are open to all students who have standing in no more than one full course in English.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG140Y5 • Contemporary World Literatures

An exploration of how late twentieth and twenty-first century literature in English responds to our world. Includes poetry, prose, and drama by major writers, such as Morrison, Munro, Coetzee, and Rushdie, and emerging writers.

Exclusions: ENG105H5

Enrolment Limits: 100-level courses are designed to increase students’ skills in close reading, interpretation, and effective writing; emphasize the development of analytical and essay-writing skills; and build acquaintance with major literary forms and conventions that students need in more advanced courses. They are open to all students who have standing in no more than one full course in English.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 48L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG201Y5 • Reading Poetry

An introduction to poetry, through a close reading of texts, focusing on its traditional forms, themes, techniques, and uses of language; its historical and geographical range; and its twentieth-century diversity.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG204H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG202H5 • British Literature in the World I: Medieval to Eighteenth-Century

This course serves as an introduction to influential texts that have shaped British literary history from Beowulf and Chaucer to Shakespeare, from Milton and Behn to Burney. Students will focus on questions such as the range and evolution of poetic forms, the development of the theatre and the novel, and the emergence of women writers. The course will encourage students to think about the study of English literatures in relationship to history, including the history of world literatures.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG202Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG203H5 • British Literature in the World II: Romantic to Contemporary

An introduction to influential texts that have shaped British literary history from the Romantic period to the present, covering developments in poetry, drama, and prose, from William Wordsworth to Zadie Smith and beyond. The course will address topics such as revolution and war; the increasing diversity of poetic forms; the cultural dominance of the novel; romanticism, Victorianism, modernism, and postmodernism; feminism; colonialism and decolonization; the ethnic and cultural diversity of Anglophone literature in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; literature and sexual identity; the AIDS epidemic; and technology and the digital age. The course will encourage students to think about the study of English literatures in relationship to history, including the history of world literatures.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG203Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG204H5 • How to Read Poetry

This course gives students the tools they need to appreciate and understand poetry's traditional and experimental forms, specialized techniques, and diverse ways of using language. The course asks a fundamental question for literary studies: why is poetry is such an important mode of expression in so many different time periods, locations, and cultures?

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG201Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG205H5 • Rhetoric

An introduction to the rhetorical tradition from classical times to the present with a focus on prose as strategic persuasion. Besides rhetorical terminology, topics may include the discovery and arrangement of arguments, validity in argumentation, elements of style, and rhetorical criticism and theory.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: WRI305H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG206H5 • Rhetorical Criticism

This course will use the tools and perspectives of rhetoric, from the Sophists to the postmodern, to analyze and critique the texts and other cultural artifacts that surround us. Much of what we encounter in the cultural realm is an argument; the task in this course will be to understand and engage with those arguments. Students will analyze the rhetoric of poetry, fiction, and drama, as well as of news stories, speeches, video, images, and more.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG210Y5 • The Novel

An introduction to the novel through a reading of ten to twelve texts, representing a range of periods, techniques, regions, and themes.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG211H5 • Introduction to the Novel

This course gives students a foundational understanding of the novel in English. It introduces them to the history of the novel, from medieval sagas and adventure stories to modern experiments with fragmentary narratives. The course covers novels from a range of geographical places; students will be asked to consider why the novel has been so successful in the past, and what its futures might be. Students will read at least one complete novel during the course and extracts from others.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG210Y

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG213H5 • The Short Story

This course explores shorter works of nineteenth, twentieth and twenty first-century writers. Special attention will be paid to formal and rhetorical concepts for the study of fiction as well as to issues such as narrative voice, allegory, irony, and the representation of temporality.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG214H5 • The Short Story Cycle

This course explores collections of short stories. It examines individual stories, the relationships among and between stories, the dynamics of the collection as a whole, and the literary history of this genre, along with its narrative techniques and thematic concerns.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG215H5 • The Canadian Short Story

An introduction to the Canadian short story, this course emphasizes its rich variety of settings, subjects, and styles.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG217H5 • Writing about the Visual Arts

This course introduces students to various literary traditions of writing about the visual arts, from the close analysis of images in novels, poems, and essays to verbal forms (such as ekphrasis and calligrammes) that make poetry and fiction out of paintings, photographs, and sculptures. While the puzzle of translating between space-based and time-based arts will be at the centre of our inquiry, the course will also consider texts and books as visual objects; how writers create visual experiences and mental images; and how literary writing is inspired by museums and exhibitions. Students will have opportunities to practice writing about the arts in collaboration with the Blackwood Gallery at UTM and its featured artists, and, when possible, with other Peel Region and Greater Toronto Area artists and galleries.

Prerequisites: 4.0 credits Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG218H5 • Interactive Storytelling and Worldmaking

This course examines the deep history and extraordinary diversity of interactive storytelling, with a focus on narrative art in digital games, transmedia/cross-platform projects, alternate reality and pervasive games, theme parks, and immersive performances, as well as literary texts and films. We will consider forms (e.g., riddles, parables, metafiction, branching narratives) that require participatory agency, choice-based and emergent storytelling, as well as genres (e.g., creation myths, planetary romances, travelogues, adventure fiction, Expressionist cinema) that discover or assemble a narrative by traversing a world. We will also explore the contexts and theoretical grounds of reader- and player-centric approaches.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed a minimum of 4.0 credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG223H5 • Introduction to Shakespeare

This course introduces students to Shakespeare. Lectures equip them with historical knowledge about literature, politics, and the theatre in Shakespeare's time. Tutorials help them to grapple with Shakespeare's language, versification, and stagecraft. By the end of the course students will have a new framework within which to understand - and interrogate - the enduring power of Shakespeare's work.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG220Y5 or DRE221Y5 or DRE224H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG234H5 • Children's Literature

A critical and historical introduction to works written and created for or appropriated by children, from early didactic forms through the “Golden Era” to 20th-century fiction and contemporary works that centre non-white identities and experiences. The course may include fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction, and visual media, and will cover works by authors such as John Bunyan, Robert Louis Stevenson, Lewis Carroll, Mark Twain, Lucy Maud Montgomery, A.A. Milne, Louise Fitzhugh, Salman Rushdie, Cherie Dimaline, Aviaq Johnston, Katherina Vermette, Audrey Thomas, Jason Reynolds, Hanna Alkaf, Namina Forna.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed a minimum of 4.0 credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG235H5 • Comics and the Graphic Novel

An introduction to the writing and sequential art of comics and graphic novels, this course includes fictional and nonfictional comics by artists such as Will Eisner, Art Spiegelman, Frank Miller, Alan Moore, Chris Ware, Daniel Clowes, Julie Doucet, Marjane Satrapi, Chester Brown and Seth.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG236H5 • Detective Fiction

At least 12 works by such authors as Poe, Dickens, Collins, Doyle, Chesterton, Christie, Sayers, Van Dine, Hammett, Chandler, Faulkner, P.D. James, Rendell.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG237H5 • Science Fiction

This course explores speculative fiction that invents or extrapolates an inner or outer cosmology from the physical, life, social, and human sciences. Typical subjects include AI, alternative histories, cyberpunk, evolution, future and dying worlds, genetics, space/time travel, strange species, theories of everything, utopias, and dystopias.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG238H5 • Fantasy Literature

This course focuses on fantasy literature, film, and television, and draws on a wide range of critical, cultural, and theoretical approaches. As it explores the magical and supernatural, it may consider such genres as alternative histories, animal fantasy, epic, fairy tales, magic realism, and swords and sorcery. Authors and texts covered will survey the history of fantasy across American, British, and Canadian literature, and may include Beowulf, Butler, Carroll, Gaiman, Le Guin, Lewis, Martin, Ovid, Rowling, Shakespeare, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Swift, and Tolkien.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG239H5 • Horror Literature

A critical and historical critical introduction to gothic literature, film, and television covering such authors as Carter, King, Lovecraft, Matheson, Poe, Rice, Shelley, Stevenson, and Stoker. The course draws on diverse critical and theoretical approaches as it examines a wide range of national and cultural contexts. It focuses on the gothic in broad terms and such concepts and issues as fear, horror, terror, the monstrous, the mythological, and the supernatural.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG250Y5 • American Literature

An introductory survey of major works in American literature, this course explores works in a variety of genres, including poetry, fiction, essays, and slave narratives.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG251H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG251H5 • Introduction to American Literature

This course introduces students to major works in American literature in a variety of genres, from poetry and fiction to essays and slave narratives.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG250Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG252Y5 • Canadian Literature

An introductory survey of major Canadian works in poetry, prose, and drama from early to recent times.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG255H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG255H5 • Introduction to Canadian Literature

This course introduces students to Canadian literatures, from the oral narratives of Canada's early Indigenous communities to new writing in a digital age.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100 level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG252Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG259H5 • Literature and Environmental Criticism

This course examines the relationship between writing and the environment. Students will examine the role of the written word in defining, thinking about, and acting in the interest of the planet and its climate, while considering literary genres, theoretical frameworks, and contemporary and multidisciplinary debates. Readings will vary but may include Wordsworth, Thoreau, Whitman, Carson, Glissant, Butler, Kincaid, and Ghosh.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG261H5 • Music and Literature

This course introduces students to the intersection of music and literature. We will study how melody, rhythm and texture interact with language, story and performance using examples from folk ballads and blues, art-songs, popular songs, musical theatre, jazz and hiphop, as well as poems inspired by musical styles and performers. Works to be covered may include folksongs collected by Francis Child and Alan Lomax, Thomas Moore’s Irish Melodies, popular songs by Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen and Joni Mitchell, theatrical works by Bertolt Brecht, Stephen Sondheim and Lin-Manuel Miranda, performances by The Last Poets, hiphop lyrics by Public Enemy, and poems by William Blake, William Wordsworth, Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes and Don McKay.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG263H5 • Play and Games

Despite its reputation as a diversion from the serious activities of life, play has been understood by philosophers and social theorists as essential to human development and as the foundation of freedom, self-understanding, civic identity, social justice, and artistic contemplation. This course surveys the ways and reasons we play in relationship to the objects we play with, including things that are more normally thought of as games—card and board games, sports, toys, video games—as well as other sites of playful thought and action, like paintings, novels, dramatic texts, fashion, and conflict management. Students in this course will encounter major scholars of play (Schiller, Huizinga, Caillois, Winnicott, Geertz, Flanagan, McGonigal, among others) and designers of rules (Emperor Yao, Magie and Darrow, Will Wright, Sid Meier, among others), key terms and concepts in the analysis of play and games, as well as games and ludic enterprises across a variety of cultures and media. Students will also consider problems in play and games like cheating, addiction, and gamification.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed a minimum of 4.0 credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG269H5 • Queer Writing

Introducing a lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer tradition in literature and theory, this course may explore texts from a variety of historical periods, from the classical to the contemporary. It will focus on a variety of genres, potentially including poetry, drama, fiction, criticism, and popular culture.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG273Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG271H5 • Toronto's Multicultural Literatures

Toronto is one of the world's most diverse and multicultural cities. This course is a study of literature by writers with strong connections to Toronto who explore issues such as diasporas, identity, nationality, place, origin, and the multicultural experience. Writers may include: Judy Fong Bates, Dionne Brand, Austin Clarke, Pier Giorgio Di Cicco, Rohinton Mistry, Michael Ondaatje, M. Nourbese Philip, Shyam Selvadurai, M. G. Vassanji.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG273H5 • Literatures of Immigration and Exile

In this course we will study literary and non-literary texts in English from the nineteenth century to the present day that come from colonial and postcolonial contexts and that speak to the experience of those affected by colonization, immigration, exile, war, and globalization. Students will be introduced to postcolonial theory and questions about race, ethnicity, religious difference, and diasporas in Anglophone literary studies. They may study texts by Conrad, James, Beckett, Joyce, Rhys, Pound, Ionesco, Nabokov, Koestler, Brodsky, Naipaul, Achebe, Kundera, Skvorecky, Rushdie, Gallant, Sebald, Ondaatje, Danticat, Ali, and Nafisi.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG253Y5 or ENG270Y1 or ENG270Y5 or ENG272H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG274H5 • Indigenous Literature and Storytelling

An introduction to Indigenous literature and storytelling with emphasis on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit authors in Canada and Native American authors in the United States of America. In this course, students will review academic citation practices, apply Indigenous theory to storytelling, and engage with audio recordings, poetry, drama, novels, short stories, and non-fiction by writers such as Jeannette Armstrong, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Natalie Diaz, Michael Dorris, Tomson Highway, Basil Johnston, Daniel Heath Justice, Lee Maracle, Eden Robinson, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Tommy Orange.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG275H5 • Feminist Approaches to Literature

This course will consider the implications, for literary studies and for literary writing, of modern traditions of feminist and gender theory. Students will encounter the work of major feminist thinkers - e.g., Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Alice Walker, Julie Kristeva, and Judith Butler - and texts by major women writers. The course will explore feminist approaches to literature, including those that borrow from post-structural, psychoanalytic, and contemporary gender, race, and queer theories.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG276H5 • Fanfiction

This course investigates fanfiction from a variety of theoretical standpoints, including gender and sexuality studies, critical race studies, and affect theory. It considers the literary history of fanfiction- amateur, unauthorized stories about characters invented by canonical writers (e.g., Jane Austen and Arthur Conan Doyle); a wide selection of fanfiction stories; and the commercialization of the products of the modern fanfiction industry.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG277H5 • Bad Romance

This course covers romances of the eighteenth to the twenty-first century, ranging from the amatory (stories about love, longing, and desire) to the fantastic (the supernatural and fantasy). Students will consider issues of canonization, popularity, the text-author-reader relationship, definitions of high and low art, ideas about good and bad writing, and eroticism and desire. Texts may include Harlequin romances, paranormal romance, and works by Jane Austen, the Brontes, Daphne du Maurier, Stephenie Meyer, Nicholas Sparks, Sarah Waters, and E. L. James.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG279H5 • Video Games

What is the literary history of video games? This course considers how some novels and plays work like games; how games have evolved complex and often non-verbal means of conveying narratives; and whether narrative in fiction, theatre, and film can or should be a model for storytelling in the rule-bound, interactive worlds of video games.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG280H5 • Critical Approaches to Literature

An introduction to literary theory and its central questions, such as the notion of literature itself, the relation between literature and reality, the nature of literary language, the making of literary canons, and the roles of the author and the reader.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.
Exclusions: ENG267H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG289H5 • Creative Writing

Students will engage in a variety of creative exercises, conducted across a range of different genres of literary writing.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG291H5 • Reading for Creative Writing

This course will help students to see connections between their reading and their work as creative writers. They will read texts in a variety of literary and non-literary genres and consider the way that writers learn their craft from other writers. Practical assignments will encourage students to find creative ways to critique, imitate, speak to, and borrow responsibly from the work they read.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work on the research project of a professor. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods, and share in the excitement and discovery of creating new knowledge. Professors' project descriptions for the following fall-winter session are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG300Y5 • Chaucer

The foundation of English literature: in their uncensored richness and range, Chaucer's works have delighted wide audiences for over 600 years. Includes The Canterbury Tales, with its variety of narrative genres from the humorous and bawdy to the religious and philosophical, and Troilus and Criseyde, a profound erotic masterpiece.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG301H5 • Making Love in the Sixteenth Century

In this course, students will follow the changing constructions of love and love poetry in the sixteenth century, starting with Wyatt and Surrey, passing through Tottel, to the Elizabethan court, and ending with the erotic love poetry that served as a backlash against the Petrarchanism of the early sixteenth century.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG303H5 • Milton

Selections from Paradise Lost and other works.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG304H5 • Seventeenth-Century Poetry

Considering literature during the reign of the early Stuarts and the Civil War, this course includes such poets as Donne, Jonson, Lanyer, Wroth, Herbert, and Marvell, and such prose writers as Bacon, Clifford, Donne, Wroth, Burton, Cary, Browne, Hobbes, Milton, and Cavendish.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG304Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG305H5 • Eighteenth-Century Satire and Print Culture

This course surveys what has been referred to as the ‘golden age of satire’, a period that witnessed a flourishing of satirical poetry, prose, drama, and illustration as powerful modes of critique. In the process of analyzing works by Swift, Pope, Montagu, Gay, Hogarth, and others, this course will explore concerns such as the rise of print culture, the legitimacy of satire, the gendering of satire, the role of criticism, the limits of humour, censorship, and the threat of seditious libel.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG306Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG306Y5 • Literature of the Restoration and 18th Century

Writers of this period grapple with questions of authority and individualism, tradition and innovation, in politics, religion, knowledge, society, and literature itself. Special attention to Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, and at least six other authors.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG305H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG308Y5 • Romantic Poetry and Prose

This course provides a general survey of the poetry and prose of the British Romantic period (roughly from 1770 to 1830). Subjects to be explored may include political revolution, slavery and abolition, the expansion of the British empire, the flourishing of women writers and feminist thought, and experimentation with literary forms. Authors to be considered may include Anna Barbauld, William Cowper, William Blake, Olaudah Equiano, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Hannah More, Mary Wollstonecraft, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, John Clare, Henry Louis Vivian Derozio, and John Keats.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit of ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG309H5 • Anishinaabe Storytelling and Oral Tradition

An introduction to the legends, beliefs, and values of the Anishinaabek Nation. Students will explore literary and non-literary texts, media, and/or performances, spanning traditional and innovative forms, genres, and mediums. Content may include contributions by Basil Johnston, Jane School Craft, George Copway, Richard Wagamese, Winona LaDuke, Margaret Noodin, Drew Hayden Taylor, Louise Erdrich, Waubgeshig Rice, Alan Corbiere, Isaac Murdoch, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Debajehmujig Theatre Group, and Aanmitaagzi.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG310H5 • Modern South Asian Literature in English

The English language belongs not just to the British conquerors, but also (and perhaps more so) to the artists and writers, the poets and politicians of the colonized world. From Rabindranath Tagore’s mystical poetry to Slumdog Millionaire, the styles and aesthetics of South Asian English are as vast as the peninsula itself, and the literature that has emerged from this diverse region has utterly reshaped contemporary global culture. Additionally, we will take up select contemporary criticism on subaltern studies, postcolonialism, and narratology. Authors will include Anand, Naipaul, Narayan, Suleri, Rushdie, Roy, Lahiri, as well as select works of poetry, film, and visual art.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG311H5 • Medieval Literature

This course explores a selection of writings in from medieval Britain, excluding the works of Chaucer.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG312H5 • Special Topic in Medieval Literature

A concentrated study of one aspect of medieval literature or literary culture, such as a particular genre or author, a specific theme, or the application of a particular critical approach. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG313H5 • Special Topic in Early Modern British Literature

A concentrated study of one aspect of early modern British literature or literary culture, such as a particular subgenre or author, specific theme, or the application of a particular critical approach. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG314H5 • Special Topic in Eighteenth-Century British Literature

A concentrated study of one aspect of eighteenth-century British literature or literary culture, such as a particular subgenre or author, specific theme, or the application of a particular critical approach. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG315H5 • Special Topic in Nineteenth-Century British Literature

A concentrated study of one aspect of nineteenth-century British literature or literary culture, such as a particular subgenre or author, specific theme, or the application of a particular critical approach. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG316H5 • Special Topic in Modern and Contemporary Literature

A concentrated study of one aspect of modern or contemporary literature or literary culture, such as a particular subgenre or author, specific theme, or the application of a particular critical approach. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG317H5 • Drama of the Global South

This course compares works of selected playwrights of the Global South in an effort to understand their refashioning of postcolonial perspectives and subaltern histories. Ranging beyond the West and its theatrical traditions, the course will explore innovative theatrical performances that focus on South-South affiliations and link discourses, places, and people positioned between peripheries. Students will learn about traditions of orality, cultural pluralities, and indigenous mythic/folk styles that constitute the unique syncretism of South-South theatre cultures. Writers may include Padmanabhan, Nadeem, Jinghui, Taha, Fugard, Aidoo, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Miri, Walcott, Triana, and Dorfman.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG318H5 • Eighteenth-Century Women Writers

A study of poems, novels, dramas, and prose works by British and American authors such as Mary Astell, Aphra Behn, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Frances Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Eliza Haywood, Hannah More, Judith Sargent Murray, Mercy Otis Warren, Charlotte Smith, Phyllis Wheatley, and Mary Wollstonecraft. Topics may include professionalization and the literary marketplace; domestic labour; motherhood and children’s literature; class and education; personal agency and political engagement; colonialism, slavery, and abolition; Bluestocking culture; and early feminist thought.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG307H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG319H5 • Sexuality, Race, and Gender in Video Games and Gaming Culture

This course investigates representation and identity in and through digital games. Students will primarily consider gender, race, sexuality, and the non-human world in relation to the complex circuits of desire, projection, and disguise that exist among players, avatars, non-player characters, and other gamers. Students will interpret and critique both blockbuster AAA games with large development budgets and production teams as well as small-scale indie and experimental games and will learn about expressive, critical, and avant-garde design and play practices. The class will also discuss games as instruments of persuasion, protest, social change, and community formation.

Prerequisites: (1.0 credit of ENG, which must include 0.5 credit of 200-level ENG Game Studies and 3.0 additional credits) or permission from the department

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG320H5 • Transforming Literature in the Sixteenth Century

This course focuses on transformations of major literary forms during the sixteenth century, especially on how these transformations involve engagements with medieval and earlier materials. It covers such topics as Petrarchan poetry in translation by Wyatt and Surrey; John Fox's and John Bale's repackaging of Anne Askew's biography; and the work of Ovid and other classical authors in translation and adaptation, as in the Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in English and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG302Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG322Y5 • The Rise of the Novel in the Eighteenth Century

This course studies the emergence of prose fiction as a genre recognized in both a literary and a commercial sense. Authors may include Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Scott, and Austen.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG323H5 • Austen and Her Contemporaries

A study of selected novels by Austen and of works by such contemporaries as Radcliffe, Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Edgeworth, Scott, and Shelley, in the context of the complex literary, social, and political relationships of that time.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG325H5 • The Victorian Novel

This course surveys several major novels in order to understand the genre that came to dominate literary culture in the Victorian era. Topics may include realism, the marriage plot, the social-problem novel, feminism and sexual identity, novels of growing up, the city, and seriality. Authors may include Dickens, Thackeray, E. Bronte, C. Bronte, Gaskell, Trollope, Eliot, Collins, Hardy, Gissing, and Wilde, among others.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG324Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG326H5 • Premodern World Literatures

This course approaches the premodern period by examining early British literatures alongside literary works of the period c.500-1650 from the continents of Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Texts may include Tang dynasty poetry, the Tale of Genji, the Persian epic Shahnameh, the Italian Decameron, 1001 Nights, Old Norse sagas, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and Harriot's Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia. Texts will be provided in translation where necessary.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG327H5 • Blame Chaucer

This course takes a close look at some of the bawdy, irreverent, and even dangerous texts written in fourteenth-century England by Geoffrey Chaucer. As he recounts erotic dreams, tells the story of a faithless woman in Troilus and Criseyde, and narrates tales told on a riotous, drunken pilgrimage in The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer repeatedly tells his readers not to blame him for what he writes. Students in this course will ask: who is to blame, if not the author himself?

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG329H5 • Contemporary British Fiction

This course explores six or more works by at least four British contemporary writers of fiction.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG330H5 • Medieval Drama

Texts and performances preceding and underlying the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, including creation-to-doomsday play cycles; plays performed in parishes, inns, great halls, outdoor arenas, and at court; religious and political propaganda plays; political pageants. Attention is given to social, political, and theatrical contexts.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG331H5 • Elizabethan Drama

This course explores English drama to the end of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, with attention to such playwrights as Lyly, Kyd, Marlowe, and Shakespeare.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG332Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG332H5 • Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature

This course engages with British poetry, drama, and prose from the later seventeenth century through early eighteenth century—a period that saw the restoration of the monarchy, the Glorious Revolution, the Acts of Union, and the transition from Stuart to Hanoverian rule. Topics to be addressed may include religious and political dissent; colonialism and slavery; libertine culture; theatrical performance; female actors and women writers; the “birth” of the novel; and the establishment of the periodical press. Authors may include Aphra Behn, John Bunyan, Susanna Centlivre, Daniel Defoe, John Dryden, Anne Finch, Delarivier Manley, Samuel Pepys, and the Earl of Rochester.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits
Exclusions: ENG308Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG333H5 • The Modernist Novel

This course explores novels by such writers as James, Conrad, Cather, Forster, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, and Faulkner.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG328Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG334H5 • Global Indigenous Literatures

This course studies Indigenous literatures from around the world. Regions may include the Americas, the Pacific Islands, New Zealand, Australia, Asia, Africa, Russia, and Scandinavia. Through these literatures, the course addresses topics such as: the specific and localized ways colonialism manifests and exerts power; UNDRIP (the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples); the distinct experiences, histories, storytelling traditions, and decolonization processes of Indigenous peoples from different regions; how and why decolonization processes shift from one part of the world to another; and movements and experiences that bring Indigenous peoples from various regions together in solidarity.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG335H5 • Jacobean Drama

This course explores English drama from the death of Queen Elizabeth I to the closing of the theatres, with attention to such playwrights as Jonson, Middleton, Shakespeare, and Webster. As part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG332Y5

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG336H5 • Special Topic in Shakespeare

A concentrated study of one aspect of Shakespeare's work, such as his use of a particular genre, a particular period of his work, a recurring theme, or the application of a particular critical approach. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG337H5 • Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama

A study of drama and theatrical performance from 1660-1800, featuring works by authors such as Aphra Behn, Susannah Centlivre, William Congreve, Hannah Cowley, John Gay, George Lillo, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Richard Steele, and William Wycherley. Students can expect to learn about the modes of drama practiced during this period and their intersection with sexuality and gender, class, economics, politics, colonialism, and national identity. Students will also learn about theatre history, including the advent of female performers, changing theatre construction, the Licensing Act and theatrical censorship, the rise of the celebrity actor, and the popularization of Shakespeare.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG338H5 • Eighteenth-Century British Literature

This course engages with British poetry, drama, and prose from the “Augustan Age” through the early Romantic period. Topics may include the flourishing of print culture; satirical and sentimental literature; the “rise” of the novel; art and aesthetics; science and technology; colonialism, slavery, and abolition; and women writers. Authors may include Frances Burney, Henry Fielding, Thomas Gray, Eliza Haywood, William Hogarth, Samuel Johnson, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Alexander Pope, Samuel Richardson, Mary Robinson, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, and Jonathan Swift.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG308Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG339H5 • Early Modern Women Writers

A study of poems, plays, prose fiction, and polemical works by medieval and early modern writers such as Anne Askew, Mary Wroth, Queen Elizabeth I, Mary Sidney, Amelia Lanyer, Lucy Hutchinson, Hester Pulter, and Margaret Cavendish. Topics may include race, women and science, love poetry from a female perspective, gender and trans studies, renarrations of the story of Eve, sexuality, and editorial history and practice.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG307H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG340H5 • The Rise of Modern Drama

A study of plays in English by such dramatists as Wilde, Yeats, Shaw, Synge, Glaspell, Hughes, and O'Neill, as well as plays in translation by such dramatists as Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, and Pirandello.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG338Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG341H5 • Modern Drama: Late Twentieth-Century to Present Day

A study of plays by such dramatists as Beckett, Miller, Williams, Pinter, Soyinka, and Churchill, with background readings from other dramatic literatures.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG338Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG342H5 • Contemporary Drama

A study of ten or more plays by at least six recent dramatists.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG339H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG343H5 • World Drama

Students will read/watch screenings of drama in English and in translation from around the world, including Africa, East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, Latin America, and South America. Topics may include traditional forms (Kathakali dance, Noh and Kabuki, Beijing Opera, Nigerian masquerades) adapted for the modern stage; agit-prop and political drama; object performance; the place of drama within a global media ecology; and drama as a site of intercultural and transcultural appropriation, negotiation, and exchange.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG344H5 • Spy Fiction

This course examines the rise and popularization of spy fiction in the twentieth century. It focuses on authors such as Graham Greene and John le Carré within the context of the Cold War and the nuclear stand-off between the Soviet Union and the West.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG345H5 • Victorian Poetry

This course surveys the poetry of the Victorian era in Britain, with a focus on experiments in poetic genre and form, and on the social and political commitments of poetry in a period of colonialism, industrialization, and changing ideas about gender and sexuality. Topics may include lyric and the dramatic monologue, the poetry of political protest, love and sexuality, feminism and queerness, aestheticism and decadence, empire and the emergence of global poetry in English, and pastoral and the poetry of urban life. Poets may include Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning, Matthew Arnold, Christina Rossetti, D. G. Rossetti, Gerard Manley Hopkins, A. C. Swinburne, Toru Dutt, George Meredith, Augusta Webster, Amy Levy, Oscar Wilde, Michael Field, Thomas Hardy, Sarojini Naidu, and many others.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG347Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG346H5 • Indigenous First Story Toronto

This course explores the history of Toronto/Tkaronto as it is documented in contemporary Indigenous texts and oral narratives. In addition to engaging with these works to provide a fuller understanding of Indigenous histories, treaties, and laws, this course may draw from archives such as First Story Toronto at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto to shed light on present-day lived experiences. The course asks students to reflect on what it means to be treaty people within this territory, the responsibilities of living in the Toronto area, and how to be more mindful as treaty partners to Indigenous residents within this space and place. Course content may include audio recordings, fiction, non-fiction, poetry, visual art, film, and drama. The course may also include land-based and autoethnographic components.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG347H5 • The Nineteenth-Century American Novel

This course will introduce students to historical and cultural concerns of nineteenth-century America through major subgenres of the novel, including the gothic, the sentimental, realism, and naturalism. Emphasis will be on shifts in the novel across the century as well as the relationship of the nineteenth-century novel to print culture, including serial publication in literary magazines and newspapers. We may also think about how non-fiction texts from this period draw on the conventions of fiction. Authors studied may include Charles Brockden Brown, Fanny Fern, George Lippard, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charles Chesnutt, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, and Pauline Hopkins.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG348H5 • Special Topic in Indigenous Storywork

Applying decolonial and Indigenous methodologies, students will explore Indigenous texts, media, and/or performances, spanning traditional and innovative forms, genres, and mediums engaged by Indigenous writers and makers. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG349H5 • Contemporary Poetry

This course examines works by a variety of contemporary poets, focusing on how their writing participates in contemporary dialogues about art, society, and the larger world.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG350H5 • Poetry and Modernism

Special study of Hopkins, Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Stevens; selections from other poets.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG348Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG351H5 • Toni Morrison: Texts and Contexts

In this advanced introduction to the work of Toni Morrison, we will encounter masterpieces such as Sula, Song of Solomon, and Beloved and pay particular attention to questions of literary tradition and inheritance, form and narrative voice, and ethics in contexts of oppression. We will read most of Morrison’s novels, alongside major essays, in the chronological order in which they were published. Students will be introduced to major themes in African American literary criticism and theory through close engagement with Morrison’s oeuvre and its critical legacy.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG352H5 • Canadian Drama

Canadian plays, with emphasis on major playwrights and on developments since 1940, but with attention also to the history of the theatre in Canada.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG223H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG353Y5 • Canadian Prose Fiction

A study of twelve or more Canadian works of fiction, primarily novels.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG392H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG354Y5 • Canadian Poetry

A study of major Canadian poets, modern and contemporary.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG393H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG355H5 • Black British Literature

This course is an advanced introduction to the concept and key texts of ‘Black British literature.’ A term arising directly in response to empire and the postcolonial, Black British literature indicates texts written by both African- and South Asian- descended writers from the Caribbean, Africa, and the subcontinent. Focused primarily on the twentieth-century, we will contextualize this literary tradition within wider questions of Britain in the world and how the idea of literary influence is challenged and re-formed. Writers may include: Sam Selvon, Hanif Kureishi, Derek Walcott, Stuart Hall, Buchi Emecheta, Caryl Philips, Zadie Smith, Helen Oyeyemi, and Warsan Shire.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG356H5 • Caribbean Literature

A multi-lingual and multi-racial archipelago, the Caribbean has a rich literary and theoretical tradition: this course will introduce students to major figures in Caribbean Anglophone literature (including Jean Rhys, Kamau Brathwaite, George Lamming, Erna Brodber, V.S. Naipaul, Jamaica Kincaid, in addition to some texts read in English translation (including Aimé Cesaire, Alejo Carpentier, Maryse Condé, Marie Vieux Chauvet)

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG357H5 • New Writing in Canada

Close encounters with recent writing in Canada: new voices, new forms, and new responses to old forms. Texts may include or focus on poetry, fiction, drama, non-fiction, or new media.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG358H5 • Special Topic in Canadian Literature

A concentrated study of one aspect of Canadian literature or literary culture, such as a particular subgenre, author, period, or theme, or the application of a particular critical approach. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG359H5 • Land Back: Indigenous Voices and Narratives

This course examines how stories by Indigenous Peoples assert the inherent right to Indigenous sovereignty, self-determination, and self-government, with emphasis on settler colonialism in Canada and in the United States of America. This course engages with Indigenous narratives to understand the relationship between concepts of land rights, Indigenous resurgence, reconciliation, decolonization, and the politics of recognition. Topics may include Indigenous futurisms, digital sovereignty, treaty-making, Indigenous feminisms, sovereign eroticism, Indigenous political movements, land-based organizing, and environmental and climate justice. Texts may include the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the UN Working Group on Indigenous Peoples, as well as film, music, literature, and non-literature from individuals such as Glen Coulthard, Winona Laduke, Alanis Obomsawin, Tracey Lindberg, Audra Simpson, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Joy Harjo, Leroy Little Bear, Snotty Nosed Rez Kids, and Taiaiake Alfred.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG360H5 • Early American Literature

This course explores writing in a variety of genres produced in the American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, such as narratives, poetry, autobiography, journals, essays, sermons, and court transcripts.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG361H5 • Canadian Literature, Beginnings to 1920

This course explores the origins of Canadian literature, with an emphasis upon the post-Confederation period. Students will examine work in a range of genres, which may include novels, short stories, life writing and poetry, and will consider how the nation is being created and debated in print. Topics may include settler colonialism, nationalism, and representation. Attention may also be paid to Canadian book history and print culture in the period.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG362H5 • Canadian Literature, 1920 to the Present

This course explores Canadian literature from the 1920s to the contemporary period. Students will examine the work of major authors in their cultural, social, and historical contexts. Topics may include the development of literary modernism in Canada, regional literary geographies, postmodern innovations, multiculturalism and hybridity, and Indigenous literary and cultural production in the part of Turtle Island that is called Canada.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG363Y5 • Nineteenth-Century American Literature

This course explores American writing in a variety of genres from the end of the Revolution to the beginning of the twentieth century.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG394H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG364Y5 • Twentieth-Century American Literature

This course explores twentieth-century American writing in a variety of genres.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG395H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG365H5 • Contemporary American Fiction

This course explores six or more works by at least four contemporary American writers of fiction.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG366H5 • Special Topic in American Literature

A concentrated study of one aspect of American literature or literary culture, such as a particular subgenre, author, period, or theme, or the application of a particular critical approach. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 other credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG367H5 • African American Literature

This class is an advanced introduction to the field of African American literary studies, tracing its origins and emergence through the slave trade to the present day, with particular focus on nineteenth- and twentieth-century writing, and the criticism and theory to which it gives rise. Authors studied may include: Harriet Jacobs, Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, James Baldwin, Gayl Jones, Toni Morrison.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG368H5 • Black Feminist Poetics

This course considers the relationship between poetry written by Black women (particularly June Jordan, Audre Lorde, and Lucille Clifton) and Black feminist theory (bell hooks, Angela Davis, the Combahee River Collective). In addition to a grounding in this 20th-century moment, the course will also consider nineteenth-century example (including Sojourner Truth and Ida B. Wells) and the contemporary moment, consider a wide arc of how Black feminism produces and arises from Black poetics.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG369H5 • Black Women’s Writing

This course takes as its focus the intersection of race and gender as explored and expressed in diasporic Black women’s writing. With a focus on North America, we will ask about the relationships amongst self-expression and genre under conditions of disempowerment. This course introduces contemporary thinking about race and colonial encounters alongside fiction and life-writing by African American, Canadian, and Caribbean women from a range of historical periods. Authors may include: Mary Prince, Harriet Jacobs, Audre Lorde, Jamaica Kincaid, Edwige Danticat, Dionne Brand.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG370H5 • Global Literatures in English

This course involves in-depth study, within the framework of postcolonial and transnational studies, of literatures in English from around the world. It includes fictional and non-fictional texts and contemporary films and media representations.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG371H5 • Special Topic in World Literatures

A concentrated study of one aspect of postcolonial literature or literary culture, such as a particular genre, author, period, regional or national context, or theme, or the application of a particular critical approach. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credits in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG372H5 • Special Topic in Literary Theory

A concentrated study of one aspect of literary or critical theory, such as a particular school of theory, an important author, or a contemporary theoretical debate. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG373H5 • Creative Writing: Poetry

This course will involve a wide variety of experiments with poetic expression and poetic forms.

Prerequisites: ENG289H5 or ENG291H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG374H5 • Creative Writing: Prose

Students will experiment with fiction and non-fiction prose writing, including autobiography, biography, and narrative for new visual, digital, and interactive media.

Prerequisites: ENG289H5 or ENG291H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG375H5 • Editing Literary Texts

Students will learn the basics of literary editing for different readerships: the course will cover such topics as the selection of a base text; treatment of variants; creation of paratext; design and layout; proofs and proofchecking; and the differences between print and digital media.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits; or ENG289H5/ENG291H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG376H5 • Creative Writing: Nonfiction

Students will experiment in a workshop environment with a variety of short, non-fictional forms, e.g. memoir, auto/biography, true crime.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 other credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG377H5 • Special Topic in Creative Writing

A concentrated study of one aspect of creative writing practice, such as a particular genre or theme, or the application of a particular formal technique. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 other credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG378H5 • Special Topic in Writing for Performance

A concentrated study of one aspect of writing for performance such as a particular medium (e.g. digital), genre, or theme. Topics may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: ENG289H5 or ENG291H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG379H5 • American Literature in Global Contexts

We often categorize literature by its nation of origin when we study and teach, though we also recognize the limitations involved in doing so. Over the past several decades, the study of U.S. literature, in particular, has been shaped by transnational and global approaches that emphasize the porous nature of any “national” literature. In this course, students will study approaches to American Literature in global contexts. These may include hemispheric approaches to U.S. literatures that emphasize U.S. interactions with Central America and the Caribbean, engagements with Africa in U.S. literatures, or U.S. literatures and the Pacific from the eighteenth century through the present.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG380H5 • History of Literary Theory

Literary theory from classical times to the nineteenth century. Topics include theories of the imagination, genre analysis, aesthetics, the relations between literature and reality and literature and society, and the evaluation and interpretation of literature.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG367Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG381H5 • Digital Texts

This course considers the ways in which digital technologies are transforming texts, reading, readerships, and the idea of the literary. Students will study a wide variety of digital texts, e.g., fanfiction, webcomics, viral Tumblr posts and tweets, and video games. They will also learn about the use of digital tools to read, study, and preserve texts. The course may include a practical project, e.g., the design of a narrative game using Twine; the curation of a digital exhibit using Omeka; or an argument about some text/s using visualization software.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG382Y5 • Contemporary Literary Theory

This course explores literary theory from the early twentieth century to the present. Schools or movements studied may include structuralism, formalism, phenomenology, Marxism, post-structuralism, reader-response theory, feminism, queer theory, new historicism, psychoanalysis, postcolonial theory, and cultural and race studies.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG366Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG383H5 • British Romanticism and Its Contexts

This course gives students a new perspective on the cultural contexts for British Romanticism: students will learn about literature's relationship to philosophy, politics, religion, science, and colonialism in the Romantic period, as they examine works by some major authors such as William Wordsworth, Walter Scott, and Mary Shelley.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG384H5 • Literature and Psychoanalysis

An introduction to psychoanalysis for students of literature, this course considers major psycholanalytic ideas through close readings of selected texts by Freud and related psychoanalytic thinkers. The course also explores critiques and applications of Freud's work and examines a selection of literary texts that engage psychoanalytic theory.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG384Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG385H5 • British Romanticism, 1770-1800

This course covers the early Romantic period in British Literature. Students may read novels such as Frances Burney's Evelina; plays such as Richard Brinsley Sheridan's School for Scandal; writing on the French and American Revolutions; William Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience; and ballads by William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Hannah More, and Mary Robinson.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG308Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG386H5 • British Romanticism, 1800-1830

This course covers the later Romantic period in British Literature. Authors studied may include Walter Scott, Mary Shelley, Percy Shelley, Jane Austen, Lord Byron, and John Keats.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG308Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG387H5 • Popular Novels in the Eighteenth Century

This course offers students a chance to read some early novels in English - from the scandalous to the sentimental to the Gothic. They will consider what made novels best-sellers in eighteenth-century Britain and why the popularization of novel reading was such a source of controversy at the time. Authors may include: Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Laurence Sterne, Frances Burney, and Ann Radcliffe.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG322Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG388H5 • Spaces of Fiction

Real or imagined geographical locations, landscapes, rooms and houses play an important role in literature. In addition to providing a narrative setting, fictional space might guide our interpretation of plot, serve as a metaphor for broader historical, sociological or psychological issues, or become a character in its own right. Ranging across a variety of literary periods and genres, this course will explore how works of fiction describe space and how these descriptions shape our responses. Authors and texts may range from the early English period to the present day, including Beowulf, Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Margaret Cavendish, Jane Austen, Edgar Alan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Virginia Woolf, Daphne du Maurier, Shirley Jackson, Gloria Naylor, Toni Morrison, Arundhati Roy, Amitav Ghosh, V.S. Naipaul, and so on.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG390Y5 • Individual Studies

A scholarly project chosen by the student and supervised by a faculty member. The form of the project and the manner of its execution will be determined in consultation with the supervisor. All project proposals must be submitted to the Undergraduate Advisor, who can provide proposal forms.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credits in English and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG490Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG391Y5 • Individual Studies (Creative)

A project in creative writing chosen by the student and supervised by a faculty member. The form of the project and the manner of its execution will be determined in consultation with the supervisor. All project proposals must be submitted to the Undergraduate Advisor who can provide proposal forms.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credits in English and 3.0 other credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG392H5 • Canadian Fiction

Students will read novels and/or short stories of importance for Canadian literary history: these may include, for example, L.M. Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables, Hugh MacLennan's Two Solitudes, Lawrence Hill's Book of Negroes, and Alice Munro's Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG353Y

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG393H5 • Canadian Poetry in Context

This course gives students a chance to think about the social, historical, and personal circumstances that have produced the work of some major Canadian authors, from the poets of Canadian Confederation to contemporary Black and Indigenous writers such as M. NourbeSe Philip and Rita Joe.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG354Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG394H5 • American Literature from the Revolution to 1900

Students will read a selection of American writings from the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; these may include the stories of Edgar Allan Poe, the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, Harriet Beecher Stowe's novels, and slave narratives such as those of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG363Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG395H5 • American Literature 1900 to the Present

Students will read a selection of works by American authors as diverse as Edith Wharton, Ernest Hemingway, T.S. Eliot, Sylvia Plath, Harper Lee, Thomas Pynchon, and Jhumpa Lahiri.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.
Exclusions: ENG364Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG396H5 • Literary Theory Now

This course will explore some of the most recent, provocative, and significant developments in literary theory, including work in such areas as eco-criticism, literary activism, critical race studies, Indigenous studies, queer and trans studies, and cognitive literary studies.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG397H5 • Individual Studies

A scholarly project chosen by the student and supervised by a faculty member. The form of the project and the manner of its execution will be determined in consultation with the supervisor. All project proposals must be submitted to the Undergraduate Advisor by May 15 who can provide the proposal form.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG398H5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for upper-level students to work on the research project of a professor. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods, and share in the excitement and discovery of creating new knowledge. Professors' project descriptions for the following fall-winter session are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credits in English and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

For senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of a discipline and its research methods, this course offers an opportunity to work on the research project of a professor. Students enrolled will become involved in original research, develop their research skills, and share in the excitement and discovery of creating new knowledge. Professors' project descriptions for the following fall-winter session are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG400H5 • Capstone Seminar: Writing a Research Project

This course offers specialists and advanced majors an opportunity to do sustained and intensive research on a topic developed in consultation with the instructor. Course instruction will consist of training in various research methodologies, advice and help in putting together reading and research lists, and guided workshops where students can practice drafting, editing, and peer editing as well as comparing notes and research materials.

Prerequisites: Completion of 14.5 credits.

Enrolment Limits: English Specialists have priority for registration, followed by English Majors.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG414H5 • Seminar: Literary Theory / Methods

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG415H5 • Seminar: Literary Theory / Methods

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG416H5 • Seminar: Literary Theory / Methods

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG424H5 • Seminar: Canadian Literature

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG425H5 • Seminar: Canadian Literature

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG426H5 • Seminar: Race, Ethnicity, Diasporas, Indigeneity

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG434H5 • Seminar: Race, Ethnicity, Diasporas, Indigeneity

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG435H5 • Seminar: American Literature

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG436H5 • Seminar: American Literature

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG460H5 • Seminar: Literature Pre-1700

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG461H5 • Seminar: Literature Pre-1700

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG462H5 • Seminar: Literature Pre-1700

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG463H5 • Seminar: Literature 1700-1900

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG470H5 • Seminar: Literature 1700-1900

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG471H5 • Seminar: Literature 1700-1900

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG472H5 • Seminar: Modern and Contemporary Literature

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG473H5 • Seminar: Modern and Contemporary Literature

See department for description.

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

ENG489Y5 • Creative Writing Workshop

The course allows students to workshop their own creative project/s with the instructor and their peers. Restricted to students who in the opinion of the Department show special aptitude. Detail requirements will be posted in advance of this date. Students should contact the instructor or the Undergraduate Advisor for more information.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and portfolio must be submitted by 30 June and contact Undergraduate Advisor for more information.
Exclusions: ENG389Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 48S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH101H5 • Introduction to Art History

An overview of the art and architecture of the past and present, as well as an introduction to the discipline of art history and its methodologies. Emphasis on representative monuments and key approaches to interpretation.

Exclusions: FAH101H1 or FAH102H1 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5 or VPHA46

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH205H5 • Art in Antiquity

This course offers a survey of the arts of antiquity. Emphasis is placed on major works of sculpture, painting, and architecture. Decorative arts are also treated.

Exclusions: FAH207H1 or VPHB52
Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH215H5 • Early Medieval Art and Architecture

An overview of major monuments and themes in the art and architecture of Western Europe and the Mediterranean World from the third until the eleventh century.

Exclusions: (FAH102Y5 or FAH261H1 or FAH267H5 or FAH271H5) or VPHB53
Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH216H5 • Later Medieval Art and Architecture

An overview of major monuments and themes in the art and architecture of Western Europe and the Mediterranean World from the eleventh through the fifteenth century.

Exclusions: FAH102Y5 or FAH261H1 or FAH267H5 or FAH271H5 or VPHB53
Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH274H5 • Renaissance Art and Architecture

A selective survey of the major art centres, types of artistic production, personalities, and trends in Italy and the North, from the early fifteenth century to the mid-sixteenth. The creation and diffusion of art are addressed through an understanding of historical techniques (media), cultural determinants such as patronage, and significant works of art.

Exclusions: FAH230H1 or VPHB74H3
Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH275H5 • Introduction to Indigenous Art in Canada

This survey course will introduce students to the advanced technological and innovative material contributions of Indigenous cultural knowledge towards the reshaping of Canadian Culture, Identity and Art today; beginning with the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nations. Specificity of place, nation, geographical territory, the intervention of colonial government policy, and social movements will be reviewed as they relate to the creation and collection of Indigenous art and established art markets. Object and image making, new technologies, performance art, ceremony, land, hunting, activism, social engagement, and community arts will be covered, as will fashion, dance, song, and storytelling.

Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH279H5 • Baroque Art and Architecture

An introduction to art and society in Europe, ca. 1600 to ca. 1800 CE. Tensions between the Catholic Church and Protestantism; the rise of powerful, competing courts; the growth of increasingly complex urban centres; and the entry of the "wider public" into the art market all create new roles for representation in Europe. Developments in painting, prints, sculpture, architecture, urban planning, and festivals are considered.

Exclusions: FAH231H1 or VPHB64
Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH281H5 • An Introduction to Islamic Art and Architecture

This course surveys art and architecture of the Islamic worlds, beginning with the emergence of Islam in the seventh century. It examines works of art ranging from the monumental (palaces, mosques, shrines) to the portable (textiles, jewelry, books), spanning the Islamic world from Spain to Central and East Asia. A range of materials and artistic techniques will be considered, as will several religious and secular contexts and different patterns in patronage and workshop production.

Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5 or FAH202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH282H5 • Gardens, Homes, and Palaces in the Muslim World

How did Muslims live in the pre-modern world, and, how did they interact with their surrounding environment? This course introduces examples of homes, palaces, and gardens dating from the 8th to the 18th centuries. The course includes examples from the Arab world, Turkey, Iran, and South Asia.

Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH285H5 • Art and Religion

An introduction to the art of the major world religions (examples will mostly be taken from Christianity, Hinduism, and Islam but may also extend to Judaism, Buddhism, and religions of indigenous peoples), examining debates within these traditions around the status of the image as well as the relationship of religious images with the secular notion of 'art.'

Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH287H5 • European Art of the Nineteenth Century

Surveys major developments in European art and architecture from the late eighteenth through the end of the nineteenth century, including Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Orientalism, Realism, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, and Symbolism. Artistic responses to political change, urbanisation, capitalism, colonialism, the Academy, and the Salon will be explored as well as changing constructions of gender, race, class, and national identities through visual media.

Note:
As part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process.

Exclusions: FAH208H1 or FAH282H1 or FAH245H1
Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH288H5 • European and North American Art of the Earlier Twentieth Century

Surveys principal developments in modern art and architecture from the late 19th century through 1945. Topics covered include key movements, such as Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism, Suprematism, de Stijl, Dada, and Surrealism, and key concepts, such as the avant-garde, abstraction, the readymade, the unconscious, and the primitive. Readings include manifestos and other writings by artists as well as art historical texts.

Exclusions: FAH246H1 or VPHB58
Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH289H5 • Art Since 1945

Examines many divergent international art movements and controversies in painting, sculpture, video, installation art, performance, and other new forms, from 1945 to the present.

Exclusions: FAH246H1 or VPHB58
Recommended Preparation: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and FAH288H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH290H5 • Topics in Modern Art and Architecture

An examination of a topic in modern art and or architecture. Topics vary from year to year; the content in any given year depends upon the instructor.

Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH291H5 • History of Photography

Examines the history of photography in Euro-American visual culture and explores how this medium of mass communication has transformed our perceptions and conceptions of art, society, and culture over the past two centuries. Reviews key imagemakers and areas of production concluding with the impact of digital imaging.

Exclusions: FAH252H5 or FAH391H5
Recommended Preparation: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (VCC101H5 or VCC201H5)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH292H5 • Canadian Art

This course examines the history of art produced in Canada, from the pre-contact period to today. Diverse visual traditions and their intersections will be studied, as will the changing roles of art in Canadian society.

Exclusions: FAH248H5: Canadian Painting 1665-1960 (formerly FAH286H1) or VPHB60H3: Canadian Visual Art
Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH295H5 • Topics in Art History

An examination of a topic in art history. Topics vary from year to year; the content in any given year depends upon the instructor.

Recommended Preparation: FAH101H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work on the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit.Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods, and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge.Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH301H5 • History and Practices of Visual Resource Collecting

This course investigates the theoretical and philosophical bases and practical realities of digitizing the visual arts in the context of scholarly research, collection development, publishing, information studies and education in the global environment. Students will examine the historical development and impact of digitization on image collecting as well as current practices and issues facing professionals. A practical, hands-on approach will be an essential part of the course.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (VCC101H5 or VCC201H5) and 1.0 credits in FAH/VCC at the 200 level or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH310H5 • Curating Matters: Contexts and Issues in Contemporary Curatorial Practice

This course will introduce students to the major critical texts, theories, and debates circulating in the burgeoning international field of contemporary curatorial studies. The course will include lectures, case studies, practice-related assignments, encounters with artists and art professionals, and student presentations that are intended to raise issues and engage debate about contemporary exhibition practices and account for theoretical perspectives and historical context. One objective of this course is to trouble preconceptions of the role of the curator in order to observe the complexity of curatorial models across and beyond art institutions. The class will address the implications of shifting cultural, social, and political contexts for artistic and curatorial practice and their sites.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and FAH289H5 and 0.5 additional credit in FAH/VCC
Exclusions: VPSB73 or VIS320H1
Recommended Preparation: FAH288H5 and FAH289H5 and FAH388H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH315H5 • Photomontage: History, Theory, and Practice

This course investigates the history, theory, and practice of photomontage from its roots in combination printing in the mid-19th century to its key role in the modernist "isms of art"
in Europe and North America including Dada, Surrealism, Constructivism, and the Bauhaus to the rise of digital photomontage in the current Photoshop era. It explores a range of practices and applications of photomontage in avant-garde art, commercial advertising, mass media, humorous satire, propaganda, and political activism.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or VCC101H5) and FAH291H5.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH317H5 • Spirit Photography

From the haunted images of William Mumler in the 1860’s to contemporary manifestations of digital ghost hunting, the search for elusive and invisible spirits by means of the camera lens has been an ongoing preoccupation in the history of photography for over 150 years. Starting with the emergence of phantasmagoric visual entertainments (ca. 1800), this course reviews this rich and fascinating history in Europe and North America but also with a few non-Western cultural examples (e.g., Japan, Philippines) focusing on key case studies in spirit photographic practice. The course considers various reasons why people have wanted to believe in the veracity of these phenomena (e.g., followers of the religious movement of Spiritualism) as well as why others have wanted to debunk spirit photography as a hoax or fraud (e.g., Harry Houdini and P.T. Barnum). Exploring theories derived from deconstruction and psychoanalysis, we seek to understand the philosophical and psychological significance of spirit photography introducing constructs such as hauntology, spectrality, the uncanny, and the work of mourning. The course also reviews how contemporary artists (e.g., Oursler, Beloff) have incorporated motifs and themes related to spirit photography in their works.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or VCC101H5) and FAH291H5
Exclusions: FAH492H5 (Fall 2017)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH329H5 • Early Christian Art and Architecture

Examines art and architecture during the emergence of Christianity in the West until ca. 600, focusing primarily on Italy. Assesses the connections between polytheistic, imperial Roman art and new Christian traditions in a variety of media, including mosaics, metalwork, wall painting, and sculpture. Also considers the role of primary texts in the interpretation of Early Christian art.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH215H5 or FAH216H5) or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH332H5 • Studies in Baroque Painting

Thematically organized treatment of major figures (Caravaggio, Carracci, Poussin) in the context of art theory and viewer response.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH274H5 or FAH279H5)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH337H5 • Court Art and Patronage in the Middle Ages

Art and architecture of royal and imperial families from ca. 800 to 1400 in western Europe, including Norman, Capetian, Plantagenet, and Hohenstaufen dynasties. Topics include the role of courts in the development and diffusion of new styles, and monuments as expressions of piety, chivalry, and political propaganda. May be taken for credit for the Specialist/Major programs in Architecture (St. George).

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH216H5 or FAH217H5)
Exclusions: FAH316H1 or FAH327H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH338H5 • Multicultural Middle Ages

This course examines medieval works of art and architecture that challenge long-held ideas about the European Middle Ages as monocultural and exclusively Christian. It considers the mobility of people, objects, and ideas through migration, trade, diplomacy, conquest, and pilgrimage, and focuses on particular places where multiculturalism flourished, including Spain, Sicily, and Venice. It also evaluates multiculturalism from different eras, from the Middle Ages to the contemporary world, to better understand its different meanings and manifestations, as well as its impact on art history.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and (FAH215H5 or FAH216H5)
Recommended Preparation: At least 1.0 credits at the 200 level in FAH

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH343H5 • Pilgrimage

Examines the experience of pilgrimage from an interdisciplinary perspective, with focus on major Christian and Islamic shrines in the Middle Ages. Considers monuments associated with sites such as Santiago, Jerusalem, and Mecca, as well as objects collected by pilgrims. May be taken for credit for the Specialist/Major programs in Religion (U of T Mississauga), Christianity & Culture (St. George), and Architecture (St. George).

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and FAH216H5
Exclusions: FAH316H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH351H5 • Gothic Architecture

Study of origins, architecture and decoration of the Gothic Cathedral in the Ile-de-France, treating function and symbolism, intellectual and social contexts, and initial diffusion of the style to other countries. Considers post-medieval Gothic as well.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH216H5 or FAH217H5)
Exclusions: FAH328H1 or VPHC42

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH353H5 • The sculptor-architect GianLorenzo Bernini

Topics in the sculpture, architecture, methods and biographical legacy of the principal 17th-century artist of the Roman baroque, GianLorenzo Bernini. Focus of the course changes from year to year. May be taken for credit for the Specialist/Major programs in Religion (U of T Mississauga), Christianity & Culture (St. George), and Architecture (St. George).

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and (FAH274H5 or FAH279H5).
Exclusions: FAH352H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH356H5 • Colonial Latin American Art and Architecture

This lecture course will examine processes of cultural transfer and transformation in the planning of cities, churches, and viceregal palaces from the early days of contact through the Baroque in the Viceroyalties of Mexico and Peru and in Brasil. The persistence of indigenous beliefs and forms will be tracked in painting, sculpture, and architecture alongside the emergence of unique genres (i.e., castas, feather paintings), building types, and forms based on the particular makeup of a colonial society.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) or permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: FAH274H5 and FAH279H5 and HIS290H5 and LAS200Y1 and HIS291Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH360H5 • Art and Visual Culture of the Eighteenth Century

This course examines European painting, sculpture, architecture, landscape architecture, print culture, decorative arts, exhibition strategies, and art criticism of the eighteenth century. Key artists and writers to be studied from the age of enlightenment and revolution include Blake, Burke, David, Diderot, Fragonard, Girodet, Goya, Hogarth, Reynolds, Vigée-Lebrun, Watteau, Winckelmann, Boullée, Ledoux and Wright of Derby.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and at least 1.5 credits in FAH at the 200-level
Recommended Preparation: FAH279H5 and FAH287H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH362H5 • Modern Craft

This course examines ideas, practices, and politics of craft that have emerged in the modern period in response to the industrial and digital revolutions, and other significant social and political changes. Topics covered include the place of craft in modern and contemporary art; gendered, classed, and raced understandings of craft; craft’s relationship to the environment; and Indigenous perspectives and practices.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and (FAH287H5 or FAH288H5)
Exclusions: FAH392H5 (Craft - 20209)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH375H5 • All Our Relations: Indigenous Land Stewardship and Art

This class embraces land- and earth-based skills as tools in the production and maintenance of revitalization efforts in Indigenous culture and knowledge. Throughout the course students will lead the development, production and maintenance of a Community Medicine Garden initiative to be located in the heart of the UTM campus. Topics include environmental liberation, food sovereignty, kinship, gardening as resistance, matriarchy, land stewardship, landscaping with regional indigenous plants, Indigenous feminisms, place-based knowledge and knowledge sharing. Activities will include: film screenings, community feasts, public readings, drumming circles, and guests speakers with Traditional Indigenous knowledge carriers, artists, environmental activists, and local grassroots community-based partners.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and FAH275H5

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH380H5 • New Genres in Contemporary Art

A study of artistic genres in contemporary art, including: video, performance, installation, site-specificity and digital media. Such new genres will be studied as alternative modes of artistic practice collaborative, ephemeral, institutionally critical, and discursive, and as a means to address questions and issues such as public space, community, networks of information, and global capitalism and activism.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH288H5 or FAH289H5)
Recommended Preparation: FAH289H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH382H5 • Artists and Craftsmen from the Muslim World

What do we know about the pre-modern artists of the Muslim world? This course explores the lives or artist from the Muslim world and what we know about their education, status, styles, techniques and influences. The course includes examples of a calligrapher, a painter, a metalworker, a ceramicist, and an architect.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and FAH281H5 or FAH282H5
Exclusions: FAH395H5 - Topics course: Artists and Craftsmen from the Muslim World

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH383H5 • Cities in the Early modern Muslim World: Istanbul, Isfahan, and Delhi

This course explores the three major cities of the pre-modern Muslim empires: Istanbul under the Ottomans, Isfahan under the Safavids, and Delhi under the Mughals. The course addresses the urban formation, architectural style, and visual symbolism of these cities.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and (FAH281H5 or FAH282H5)
Exclusions: FAH395H5 Topics course: Cities in the Early modern Muslim World: Istanbul, Isfahan, and Delhi

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH385H5 • Modern and Contemporary Art of India

This course traces a chronology of South Asian art from its genealogies in late colonial image-making traditions from the 1850s to the present, situating modernist 'high' art in terms of its conversation with the broader field of cultural practice in modern India: cinema, vernacular bazaar prints, rural and tribal craft traditions, practices of popular devotion, and 'classical' artistic traditions. It investigates the theoretical and political concerns animating South Asian cultural practices and their criticism (nationalism, Marxism, secularism, anti-fundamentalism, Islam, feminism, postcolonialism, issues of diaspora and globalization), and addresses the key question of how to approach practices of modernism and postmodernism in the postcolony.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and VCC201H5 and (FAH288H5 or FAH289H5) or permission of instructor
Exclusions: FAH364H1 or FAH365H1 or FAH392H5 - Topic: Contemporary South Asian Art
Recommended Preparation: VCC302H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH388H5 • Theory in Art History

Investigates the historical development of the Western discipline of art history through the theories that have shaped it; topics covered include formalism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, the social history of art, feminism, post-colonialism, queer studies and deconstruction.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and at least 1.0 credits in FAH/VCC
Exclusions: FAH351H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH390H5 • Topics in Modern Art and Architecture

An examination of a topic in modern art and or architecture. Topics vary from year to year; the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. This will be a lecture course for approximately 30 students.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and FAH287H5 or (FAH288H5 or FAH289H5) or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH392H5 • Topics in Modern Art/Architecture

An examination of a topic in modern art and or architecture. Topics vary from year to year; the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. This will be a lecture course for approximately 30 students.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH287 or FAH288H5 or FAH289H5) or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH393H5 • Topics in Ancient Greco-Roman Art

An examination of a topic in the art and architecture of classical antiquity. Topics vary from year to year; the area of study and content in any given year depends upon the instructor. This will be a lecture course for approximately 30 students.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH203H5 or FAH204H5 or FAH205H5) or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH394H5 • Topics in Early Modern Art and Architecture

An in-depth examination of a topic in early modern (Renaissance and/or Baroque) art and/or architecture. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. A seminar course limited to approx. 30 students.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and (FAH287 or FAH288H5 or FAH289H5) or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH395H5 • Topics in Islamic Art and Architecture

An examination of a topic in Islamic art and or architecture. Topics vary from year to year; the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. This will be a lecture course for approximately 30 students.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH287 or FAH288H5 or FAH289H5) or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH396H5 • Topics in Medieval Art and Architecture

An examination of a topic in medieval art and or architecture. Topics vary from year to year; the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. This will be a lecture course for approximately 30 students.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and (FAH215H5 or FAH216H5) or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program (ROP)

This course provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their third year or beyond to work on the research project of a professor in art history/theory in return for 399Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, enhance their research skills, and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter session on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Exclusions: FAH299Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH415H5 • Theory and Criticism of Photography

Introduces a variety of approaches for interpreting, criticizing, evaluating, and theorizing photographs and photography in general. Examines how the thinking of photography is revisioned via major theoretical models.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and (FAH291H5 or FAH391H5) and a minimum of 0.5 at the 300/400 level in FAH

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH423H5 • Topics in the Art of the Medieval Mediterranean

Examines the art and architecture of the Mediterranean basin, including Western Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, and Jewish art, from the first century through the fifteenth. Considers their points of convergence as well as their distinct differences and priorities. Organized around key works of scholarship that have defined the emerging field of Mediterranean studies, along with primary sources. Considers works in all media, from monumental arts to textiles, metalwork, manuscripts, and ceramics. Also makes use of local museum holdings.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and FAH216H5 and at least 1.0 credit in FAH/VCC at the 300/400 level.
Recommended Preparation: FAH105H5 and FAH267H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH424H5 • Medieval Collecting and Display

This course examines collections of medieval art assembled during the Middle Ages and today. It considers the formation of collections within religious and secular institutions of the Middle Ages (treasuries), and the ways in which objects entered such collections through diplomacy, war, dowries, wills, and new commissions. It examines how the collections expressed historical memory, family ties, religious ideas, and political ideologies, and how the objects were displayed. The course also examines collections of medieval art in the GTA, including those at the Aga Khan Museum, Art Gallery of Ontario, Royal Ontario Museum, and University of Toronto Art Centre. A variety of methodologies will be explored, including Digital Humanities.

Prerequisites: FAH215H5 or FAH216H5 and at least 1.0 credit in FAH/VCC at the 300/400 level.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH434H5 • Art and Architecture of Medieval Rome

This seminar examines the art and architecture of Rome from the first century CE through the fourteenth. It focuses on the city's art and image in the wake of Christianization and its often ambivalent attitudes toward its classical past. Works in all media, from large-scale churches, wall paintings, and icons will be considered, along with liturgical arts and manuscripts. Medieval texts will figure prominently as well.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH216H5 or FAH217H5 or FAH205H5) and 0.5 at the 300/400 level in Medieval Art or permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: FAH267H5 or FAH343H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH435H5 • Women and Art in the Middle Ages

An interdisciplinary study, including feminist analysis, of the roles of women in the Middle Ages, their representation in medieval art, and their impact on varying aspects of the art as subject, object, patron or artist.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH216H5 or FAH217H5) and at least 0.5 FAH at the 300/400 level.
Exclusions: FAH425H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH451H5 • Curating Now: Turning Concepts into Curatorial Projects

Students will research and develop a curatorial project proposal in the form of an exhibition, a public installation, a public event, a performance, a website, etc., as the culminating assignment for the course. The emphasis of the course will be on the application of knowledge gained in FAH310H5 and consideration of the multi-level preparatory stages entailed in the mounting of a curatorial project, placing particular emphasis on conceptualization and methodology, and on the premise that curatorial practice is an intellectual endeavour that manifests its ideas in form. Students will learn how to turn a concept into a project proposal and become equipped to develop innovative solutions to future challenges in curatorial practice.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and FAH310H5
Exclusions: FAH480H5 or VIS320H5

Enrolment Limits: Intended for advanced students with high standing in the Art History or Art & Art History Program.
Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 36S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH453H5 • The Archive and the Formless

This course is a study of twentieth-century and contemporary art history that draws upon philosophies of the archive (as the formalization of knowledge in terms of origins and ends) and the formless (as a deconstructive force of these very same knowledge formations). Through close readings of key texts by Georges Bataille, Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, Jacques Derrida, and Giorgio Agamben, an understanding of the complex interrelations between the archive and the formless, and their bearing upon twentieth-century and contemporary art history is developed.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH288H5 or FAH289H5) and 1.0 credit in FAH/VCC at the 300-400 level or permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: FAH388H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH454H5 • Contemporary Jewish Art

This course examines the significance of the visual arts for the study of contemporary Jewish culture, for the construction of Jewish identities, and as an example of Jewish secularization. It does so through a survey of contemporary Jewish artistic production and visual expression with numerous and comparative examples drawn from producers in North America, Europe, and Israel. In addition, the course is attuned to the social and political dimensions and implications of contemporary Jewish art making. It will be organized thematically and cover a range of topics from the challenges faced by visual artists grappling with the Second Commandment and its prohibition of images to the continuing impact of the idea of diaspora on contemporary Jewish artists. The course will also situate its subject matter in relation to larger debates about the emergence of postmodern subjectivities and the place (or displacement) of religion and religious themes in contemporary art in general.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and FAH288H5 and FAH289H5, and at least 1.0 credit in FAH or VCC at the 300/400 level.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH455H5 • Photography and Humour

What makes a photograph funny? What are the ways in which photography as a visual and narrative medium induces laughter and provides amusement? This course explores such questions by focusing on major photographic genres and humorists (e.g., Weegee, Parr, Heartfield, Fontcuberta) and by analyzing key historical and contemporary images that mock conventional assumptions about the nature of photography and its claims to truth, identity, and reference. The course will be structured as a seminar featuring directed discussion and class presentations.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or VCC101H5) and (FAH291H5 or FAH391H5) and 1.0 credit in FAH or VCC at the 300/400 level or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH457H5 • Exile and Modern Art

Investigates the role of exile, expatriation, and alienation in art of the late 19th and 20th centuries. Considering the idea of psychological and/or physical displacement as key to the condition of modernity and the formation of artistic modernisms, the course analyzes artistic strategies of representing, coping with, and/or enacting displacement and alienation (of the artist, the viewer, the object) in the work of Gauguin, Dada artists, Pollock, Morimura, Hatoum, Wodiczko, Whiteread, and others.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH287H5 or FAH288H5) and 0.5 credit in FAH/VCC at the 300-level or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH460H5 • Art and Animation

This seminar examines the age-old dream of creating animate art, from lifelike paintings and moving statues to automata and androids. In addition to tracing historical shifts in the way Western culture has imagined its artificial counterparts through works of literature, fine arts, and film, a major focus of the course will be the effect these creations have on conceptions of the human. Readings include Castle, Dick, Freud, Hawthorne, Hoffman, Shelley, Stafford, Ovid, and Villiers de I'lsle-Adam.

Prerequisites: Must be a third- or fourth-year student currently enrolled in one of the following programs: Art History, Art & Art History, Visual Culture and Communication, or literature studies (English, French, Italian, German). Preference will be given to students in Art History, Art & Art History, and Visual Culture and Communication.
Recommended Preparation: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH287H5 or FAH288H5)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH462H5 • Islamic Art and the Museum

This course explores how museum displays construct cultural narratives for the consumption of the viewer. It focuses on Islamic art. By examining recent (21st-century) Islamic art museums and gallery installations in North America and Europe, the course addresses the topics of art collecting, orientalism, the colonial gaze, Islamophobia, and the current visual narratives of Islam and Muslims through the arts. In the first part of the course students are introduced to Islamic art through the collections of some of the main international museums including the British Museum (BM) in the UK, the Louvre in France, the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Canada, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art (MET) in New York. Students will explore the ways in which Islamic art galleries and exhibitions have evolved to reflect academic approaches including post-colonial and object studies. Students will then use the skills acquired in the course and on-line museum collections to develop and propose an Islamic art exhibition thus experiencing the process of developing an object-based narrative, writing it, presenting it, as well as responding to peer review.


Prerequisites: [FAH101H5 and (FAH281H5 or FAH282H5) and at least 1.0 credit in FAH/VCC at the 300/400 level] or permission of instructor.
Exclusions: FAH486H1 (20201) or FAH495H5 (20189) or FAH495H5 (20201) or FAH495H5 (20211).

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH465H5 • Icon, Artwork, Fetish

This seminar explores the conceptual categories of icon, artwork and fetish in order to think about the frames of value, desire and power within which images circulate, and the ongoing relationships between art, religion, and commerce. Readings drawn from critical theory, art history, anthropology, religious studies, film studies and psychoanalysis will prepare students to research case studies on the transcultural and transdisciplinary careers of particular objects/images of their choosing.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH288H5 or FAH289H5) and 1.0 credit in FAH or VCC at the 300/400 level or permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: (VCC302H5 or VCC304H5) and FAH388H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH470H5 • The History of Art History

An introduction for advanced students in art history to the historiography and institutional history of the discipline of art history. This reading-intensive course will focus on major figures and key texts from the 19th century to the present, including Burckhardt, Wölfflin, Riegl, Warburg, Panofsky, Hauser, Baxandall, Schapiro, Alpers, Clarke, Nochlin, and others.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and 1.5 in FAH at the 200-level and at least 1.0 in FAH/VCC at the 300 level or permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: FAH388H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH472H5 • Early Modern Mobile Objects

This course concerns the global circulation of objects or things in the early modern world (ca. 1500-1700) when new trade routes brought about an unprecedented mobilization of artifacts of visual culture, foodstuffs and other goods. We will be concerned with the manifold appearances of uprooted objects, new arrangements, and the invisible layers of skill, materials, and manufacture that resulted from heightened exchange. Objects of study will range broadly: porcelain, tableware and foodstuffs, screens and silver, naturalia and their elaborate mounts, miniatures, prints and books, paintings (Dutch Still Life, Las Meninas) which put the world of things on display.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 and FAH274H5) or FAH279H5 and 1.0 credit in FAH/VCC at the 300/400 level or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH473H5 • The Nature of Landscape

This seminar takes a historical and comparative view of"landscape" as the representation of land, situating it within European ideas about "nature" and its relationship to ideas about who we are as humans. It compares Western landscape painting traditions with visual forms from other traditions that could be seen as "landscapes," but might be based on very different ideas. These include Indigenous art from Canada, as well as East and South Asian forms.Understanding these multiple traditions equips students fora more globally oriented, historically informed, and critical approach to modern and contemporary art concerned with the environment and our existence in the geological age lately dubbed the Anthropocene. The seminar readings provide the basis for final research papers pertaining to the broad theme of landscape or eco-aesthetics in modern or contemporary art, as well as in other image practices across a range of global traditions.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and (FAH287H5 or FAH288H5)and 1.0 credit in FAH/VCC at the 300/400 level.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH475H5 • Topics in Contemporary Indigenous Art

A senior research and creation seminar exploring topics that advance conversations in Contemporary Indigenous art. This course will look at a selection of influential Canadian and International Indigenous Art projects by living artists as case studies. Topic will vary with faculty research interests; the course may cover such matters as environmental justice, accountability in accomplice-building between Indigenous and non-indigenous artists, and the influence of social movements in shaping local and international conversations on Indigenous Art and culture from Alcatraz and Idle No More to Standing Rock. May include a practical workshop component. May include a research, curatorial or art project.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and FAH275H5 and FAH375H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH479H5 • Studies in Curatorial Practice

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Not more than two half-courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Prerequisites: Six FAH credits including FAH310H and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH480H5 • Studies in Ancient Art

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Note:
Not more than two half-credit courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year.

Prerequisites: (FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and 3.0 credits of FAH including 0.5 credit at the 300+ level and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH481H5 • Studies in Ancient Art

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Note:
Not more than two half-credit courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year.

Prerequisites: 3.0 credits in FAH including 0.5 credit at the 300 or 400-level and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH482H5 • Studies in Medieval Art

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Not more than two half-courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Prerequisites: Six FAH courses including a 300+ level half course and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH483H5 • Studies in Medieval Art

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Not more than two half-courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Prerequisites: 3.0 credits in FAH including 0.5 at the 300 or 400-level and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH484H5 • Studies in Renaissance Art

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Not more than two half-courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Prerequisites: Six FAH courses including a 300+ level half course and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH485H5 • Studies in Renaissance Art

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Note:
Not more than two half-credit courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year.

Prerequisites: 3.0 credits in FAH including 0.5 at the 300 or 400-level and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH486H5 • Studies in Baroque Art

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Note:
Not more than two half-credit courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year.

Prerequisites: 3.0 credits in FAH including 0.5 credit at the 300 or 400-level and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH487H5 • Studies in Baroque Art

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Not more than two half-courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Prerequisites: Six FAH courses including a 300+ level half course and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH488H5 • Studies in Modern Art

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Note:
Not more than two half-credit courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year.

Prerequisites: 3.0 credits in FAH including 0.5 credit at the 300 or 400-level and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH489H5 • Studies in Modern Art

Students who have demonstrated unusual ability in earlier years will be encouraged to undertake, under the supervision of one or more staff members, special research projects culminating in a major research paper. Not more than two half-courses in Independent Studies may be taken in a single year. Students must have written consent of their faculty supervisor(s) and the undergraduate counsellor before registering.

Prerequisites: Six FAH courses including a 300+ level half course and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH490H5 • Topics in Ancient Art and Architecture

An in-depth examination of a topic in ancient art and/or architecture. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. A seminar course limited to 20 students.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH203H5 or FAH204H5 or FAH205H5) and 1.0 credits in FAH/VCC at the 300/400 level

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH491H5 • Topics in Medieval Art and Architecture

An in-depth examination of a topic in Medieval art and or architecture. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. A seminar course limited to 20 students.

Prerequisites: FAH101H5 and (FAH215H5 or FAH216H5) and 1.0 credit in FAH or VCC at the 300 or 400 level

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH492H5 • Topics in Modern Art and Architecture

An in-depth examination of a topic in modern art and/or architecture. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. A seminar course limited to 20 students.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH287H5 or FAH288H5) and at least 1.0 in FAH/VCC at the 300/400 level, or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH493H5 • Topics in Early Modern Art and Architecture

An in-depth examination of a topic in early modern (Renaissance and/or Baroque) art and/or architecture. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. A seminar course limited to 20 students.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH274H5 or FAH279H5) and 1.0 credits in FAH/VCC at the 300/400 level

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH494H5 • Topics in Contemporary Art and Theory

An in-depth examination of a topic in contemporary art and/or theory. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. A seminar course limited to 20 students.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH288H5 or FAH289H5) and 1.0 credits in FAH or VCC at the 300/400 level
Recommended Preparation: FAH288H5 and FAH289H5 and FAH388H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH495H5 • Topics in Islamic Art and Architecture

An examination of a topic in Islamic art and or architecture. Topics vary from year to year; the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. This will be a lecture course for approximately 20 students.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH287H5 or FAH288H5) and at least 1.0 in FAH/VCC at the 300/400 level, or permission of instructor
Exclusions: FAH486H1 Case Studies at the Royal Ontario Museum: Exhibiting Islamic Art and Material Culture

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH496H5 • Topics in Modern Art and Architecture

An in-depth examination of a topic in modern art and/or architecture. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. A seminar course limited to 20 students.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and (FAH287H5 or FAH288H5) and at least 1.0 in FAH/VCC at the 300/400 level, or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAH498H5 • Topics in Curatorial Studies

An in-depth examination of a topic in Curatorial Studies. Topics vary from year to year, and the content in any given year depends upon the instructor. A seminar course limited to 20 students. FAH498H5 may be counted toward the Curatorial Studies Certificate.

Prerequisites: (FAH101H5 or FAH105H5 or FAH202H5) and FAH289H5 and FAH310H5 and 0.5 additional credit in FAH/VCC
Recommended Preparation: FAH288H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS143H5 • Drawing I

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students explore the use of drawing to investigate contemporary approaches to the production of artwork. Students experiment with a variety of traditional and unconventional materials to investigate figurative drawing, observational drawing, conceptual drawing, and methods of rendering illusionistic space.

Exclusions: VIS205H1 or VPSA70

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS145H5 • Painting I

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students explore techniques and subject matter of 20th-century painting in relation to contemporary painting practices. Students apply both observational and conceptual approaches through experimentation with painting's formal elements, traditional and non-traditional painting materials, collage, and abstraction.

Exclusions: FAS230Y1 or VIS201H1 or VPSA61

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS147H5 • Photography I

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students build skills using a manual-operation camera, processing B&W film, creating silver-based photographic prints in the darkroom, and in acquiring basic digital processing and printing techniques in colour photography. Students apply their use of photography as a tool for artistic expression and as a medium for communication through discussion, analysis and interpretation.

Exclusions: VIS217H1 or VIS218H or VPSB67

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS232H5 • Print Media I

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students learn relief and intaglio processes by exploring and experimenting with the materials and techniques demonstrated in class, and integrating them with formal and contextual concerns.

Exclusions: VIS203H1 or VIS303H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS234H5 • Print Media II

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students explore the basics of screen printing using hand-drawn and cut stencil imagery. Students are encouraged to link ideas with screen printing methods most suited to their goals. Students integrate digital and photo-based imagery using software, digital photos, and scans. Focus is placed upon individual development through exploration and production.

Corequisites: FAS232H5 or permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS206H1 or VIS207H1 or VIS309H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS236H5 • Design I

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students develop an awareness of applied design thinking and theories. Students use design techniques and tools to address a range of design issues through a variety of approaches and media. Students broaden their conception of design and its application in other design and art-related disciplines through creative experimentation. The fundamental principles of design and concept development are explored by students through projects involving typography, images, colour, layout and design software for print and the Web.

Exclusions: FAS146H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS243H5 • Drawing II

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students explore the use of drawing to investigate contemporary approaches to the production of artwork. Students experiment with a variety of traditional and experimental materials to investigate figurative drawing, zines, and independent studio research.

Prerequisites: FAS143H5 or permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS205H1 or VIS211H1 or VIS305H1 or VPSB74

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS245H5 • Painting II

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students complete problem-based paintings, each over a three-week period, in response to illustrated discussion/lectures on Canadian and international contemporary painting practices. Students write visiting artist reviews and are introduced to in-depth peer critiques, a range of painting media and techniques, and portfolio documentation.

Prerequisites: FAS145H5 or permission of instructor
Exclusions: FAS230Y1 or VIS201H1 or VIS301H1 or VPSB62

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS246H5 • Design II

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students continue to develop their investigation of design thinking, theories, techniques and tools. Students study different design strategies and problem solving with practical assignments. Diverse assignments encourage students to articulate a critical awareness of the values associated with their choice of imagery, formal elements and methods of construction.

Prerequisites: FAS146H5 or FAS236H5 or permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS247H5 • Photography II

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students explore historical and contemporary uses of the medium that emphasize technical, aesthetic and conceptual considerations. Students utilize a variety of printing methods, including fibre-based printing, sequencing and other techniques that further develop the creative aspects of the medium. Use of the video camera and basic video editing are also introduced.

Prerequisites: FAS147H5 or permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS318H1 or VPSB75

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS248H5 • Sculpture I

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students delve into basic sculptural processes such as casting, mold-making and construction in both traditional and non-traditional materials. Students explore formal and conceptual concerns relative to contemporary sculpture practices that include considerations of representation, abstraction, form and space, scale and installation.

Exclusions: VIS204H1 or VIS306H1 or VPSA71

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS258H5 • Sculpture II

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students create a strong individualized methodology for developing ideas from initial research, sketches and models, through material and process exploration to a final artwork. Students begin by building an armature and modelling from life with clay in order to develop their powers of observation and hand-skills. Using mold making and woodworking techniques, students apply the sculptural aspects of space and time at the scale of the human body.

Prerequisites: FAS248H5
Exclusions: VIS204H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS330Y5 • Experimentation in Past and Present Techniques

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) This course is a practical investigation of techniques in art that have both historical precedents and contemporary applications. Media covered may include some of the following: mosaic, bas-relief in wood, encaustic, metalpoint drawing, and fresco. Students collaborate to create a mural for a public site.

Prerequisites: Any FAS200 level course and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS334Y5 • Print Media III

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students use lithography, digital printing, screen printing, relief printing and etching to establish a personalized approach to print media. Students conduct independent research and technical explorations leading to sophisticated and resolved work. Students present a biographical overview of contemporary and historical print makers to further contextualize their own work, and to become aware of how the medium of print is evolving.

Prerequisites: FAS234H5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS309H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS343Y5 • Drawing III

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students explore the use of drawing to investigate contemporary approaches to the production of artwork. Students work with a variety of traditional and unconventional drawing materials and processes to develop a portfolio of artworks.

Prerequisites: FAS243H5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS305H1 or VPSC55

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS345Y5 • Painting III

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students develop independent research habits to support self-directed projects in painting that are discussed in a peer critique setting. Students compose an artist statement of their intentions and procedures, write gallery and visiting artist reviews, prepare a contemporary Canadian or international artist presentation, and document their artwork.

Prerequisites: FAS245H5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS305H1 or VPSC54

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS346Y5 • Design III

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students develop the skills necessary to create real-world art and design-related projects. Students create full or partial design mockups, work in teams, and submit proposals to design competitions within or outside the school. Students explore contemporary art and design via simulated workplace assignments, visual presentation, field trips, guest critics, discussion and critique.

Prerequisites: FAS246H5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS347Y5 • Photography III

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students develop a critically informed photography practice by integrating the history and theory of photography with their production of original work in either an analogue or digital format. Students work with digital imaging technologies, production of digital prints, video, as well as the use of strobe lighting.

Prerequisites: FAS247H5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS318H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS348Y5 • Sculpture III

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students develop independent research habits to support self-directed projects in sculpture that are discussed in a peer critique setting. Students compose an artist statement of their intentions and procedures, write visiting artist reviews and responses to assigned readings, prepare a contemporary Canadian or international artist presentation, and document their artwork.

Prerequisites: FAS258H5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS306H or VPSB63

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS349Y5 • Video, Sound and Performance

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) This studio-based course investigates issues of identity, gender, activism, and the body within public and private space. Fieldwork will be emphasized: the locus of the classroom becomes part of a critical inquiry of everyday life or specific public events. Assignments take into consideration the temporal nature of performance, video, sound, and interactivity. Students are exposed to a range of interdisciplinary and trans-media approaches such as digital video production and projection, multi-track sound editing, installations and interventions, and online interactivity. Through readings, presentations, discussions, workshops, topical assignments, and critiques, students develop a body of work that investigates experimental time-based processes.

Prerequisites: FAS143H5 and FAS145H5 and FAS147H5 and FAS232H5 and FAS236H5 and FAS248H5, and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC/VST and permission of instructor

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS359Y5 • Video and Sound

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students explore the use of sound and video to investigate contemporary approaches to the production of time-based artwork. Students work with analogue and digital editing processes, live sound performance, site-specific soundworks, single-channel video, video installation, and will develop a professional portfolio website.

Prerequisites: FAS143H5 and FAS145H5 and FAS147H5 and FAS232H5 and FAS236H5 and FAS248H5, and an additional 0.5 credit in FAS at the 200-level and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC/VST and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS302H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS369Y5 • Performance-Based Art

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students integrate history, theory and production to develop critically informed performance practices with documentation in video and still photography.

Prerequisites: FAS143H5 and FAS145H5 and FAS147H5 and FAS232H5 and FAS236H5 and FAS248H5, and an additional 0.5 credit in FAS at the 200-level, and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC/VST and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS303H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS434Y5 • Individual Investigations in Print Media

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students conduct independent research and develop a body of work using print medium(s) of their choice. Students present information on their educational and professional goals after graduation, write an artist's statement about their work, review and discuss articles and videos, and mount a group exhibition of their work.

Prerequisites: FAS334Y5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS311H1 or VIS401H1 or VIS402H1 or VIS403H1 or VIS404H1

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS443Y5 • Individual Investigations in Drawing

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students explore the use of drawing to investigate contemporary approaches to the production of artwork. Students work with a variety of traditional and unconventional drawing materials and processes to develop a professional website portfolio. Students participate in peer critiques, and write reflective essays and artist statements.

Prerequisites: (FAS343Y5 or FAS349Y5 or FAS359Y5 or FAS369Y5) and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS305H1

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS445Y5 • Individual Investigations in Painting

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students develop independent research habits to support self-directed projects in painting that are discussed in a peer critique setting. Students write an artist statement of their intentions and procedures, prepare a Canadian and international MFA program presentation, and document their artwork.

Prerequisites: FAS345Y5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS401H1 or VIS402H1 or VIS403H1 or VIS404H1

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS446Y5 • Individual Investigations in Design

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students learn to integrate professional art and design strategies, and to research, coordinate and fully realize their own long-term projects. Students work collaboratively on large projects as well as work on mandatory and optional assignments from a range of possible assignments.

Prerequisites: FAS346Y5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS447Y5 • Individual Investigations in Photography

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students develop a critically informed photography practice by integrating the history and theory of photography with their production of original work in either an analogue or digital format. Students prepare a presentation comparing two Canadian and/or international MFA programs, in addition to preparing responses to readings and technical assignments.

Prerequisites: (FAS347Y5 or FAS349Y5 or FAS359Y5 or FAS369Y5) and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS401H1 or VIS402H1 or VIS403H1 or VIS404H1

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS448Y5 • Individual Investigations in Sculpture

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students produce a coherent body of self-directed artwork based on independent research and written proposals. In-progress and completed artworks are discussed in a peer critique setting. Students write an artist statement of their intentions and procedures, prepare a Canadian and international MFA program presentation, and document their artwork.

Prerequisites: FAS348Y5 or FAS349Y5 or FAS359Y5 or FAS369Y5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of instructor
Exclusions: VIS401H1 or VIS402H1 or VIS403H1 or VIS404H1

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS450Y5 • Advanced Project

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) In this directed study, students undertake two semesters of independent research under the mentorship of a full-time Art and Art History studio faculty member. Students develop and present a body of artwork and a written and illustrated thesis for discussion, evaluation and critique. Advanced Project students must have a B+ standing in a completed fourth-year studio. A written proposal must be submitted to, and approved by, the department before registration.

Prerequisites: 1.0 FAS 400-level course and FAS451H5 and FAS452H5 and 1.5 credits in FAH/VCC and permission of the Department.
Exclusions: VIS311H1 or VIS401H1 or VIS402H1 or VIS403H1 or VIS404H1

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 144P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS451H5 • Advanced Project

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) In this directed study, students undertake a semester-long period of independent research under the mentorship of a full-time Art and Art History studio faculty member. Students develop and present a body of artwork and a written and illustrated thesis for discussion, evaluation and critique. Advanced Project students must have a B+ standing in a completed fourth-year studio. A written proposal must be submitted to, and approved by, the department before registration.

Corequisites: 1.0 FAS 400-level credits and Permission of the Department
Exclusions: VIS311H1 or VIS401H1 or VIS402H1 or VIS403H1 or VIS404H1

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS452H5 • Advanced Project

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) In this directed study, students undertake a semester-long period of independent research under the mentorship of a full-time Art and Art History studio faculty member. Students develop and present a body of artwork and a written and illustrated thesis for discussion, evaluation and critique. Advanced Project students must have a B+ standing in a completed fourth-year studio. A written proposal must be submitted to, and approved by, the department before registration.

Corequisites: 1.0 FAS 400-level credits and Permission of the Department
Exclusions: VIS311H1 or VIS401H1 or VIS402H1 or VIS403H1 or VIS404H1

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 72P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS453H5 • Art Education Practice

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students investigate the principles of educational theory and practice for teaching the visual arts to learners including children, adolescents and adults, within a variety of educational settings.

Prerequisites: For Art and Art History majors/specialists: 4.0 FAS credits and 1.5 FAH/VCC credits, Permission of the Department. For Art History majors/specialists: 1.0 credits in FAH at the 300/400 level and Permission of the Department.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 12P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS454H5 • Professional Practice

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) Students explore the requirements of establishing a career as a practicing visual artist. Topics covered include portfolio development, finding and securing artist residency and exhibition opportunities, ways to support yourself as an artist, grant writing, photo documentation, peer group support, marketing and bookkeeping.

Prerequisites: For Art and Art History Majors/Specialists: 4.0 FAS credits and 1.5 FAH/VCC credits and permission of the department. For Art History Majors/Specialists: 1.0 credits in FAH at the 300/400 level and permission of the department.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 12P/24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FAS455H5 • Teaching Art in the School and Community

Campus: Sheridan
(Offered at Sheridan College) In this practicum course, students gain hands-on teaching experience in a setting of their choice and interact with administrators, teachers, and community leaders.

Prerequisites: For Art and Art History majors/specialists: 4.0 FAS credits, 1.5 FAH/VCC credits and Permission of the Department. For Art History majors/specialists: 1.0 credits in FAH at the 300/400 level and Permission of the Department.
Recommended Preparation: FAS453H5

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24P/15S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE180H5 • French Language Skills and Learning Strategies for University Study

This course provides students with a solid grounding in the French language skills and language learning strategies required for successful completion of a French Major or Specialist program. Students will discover vocabulary and grammatical structures in a variety of authentic written and spoken texts, connect form to meaning, participate in spoken and written interactions, and complete tasks on topics centered on student life in Montreal. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.

Prerequisites: FSL205Y5 or the equivalent as determined by the department's French Placement Test. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.
Exclusions: FSL221Y1 and FSL305Y5. Not open to native speakers of French and high school graduates of Extended French or French Immersion programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE181H5 • Introduction to French Studies

This course provides an introduction to French studies with a focus on expanding students’ French language proficiency. It also introduces basic notions in French linguistics, literary & cultural studies, and language teaching & learning. Students will practise processing authentic texts in a variety of written and spoken formats through the guided discovery of new vocabulary and through the consolidation of grammatical structures. They will learn to connect form to meaning and to develop their spoken and written skills via an investigation of global French-speaking cultures. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.

Prerequisites: FRE180H5 or the equivalent as determined by the department's French Placement Test. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.
Exclusions: FSL221Y1 or FSL305Y5. Not open to native speakers of French and high school graduates of Extended French or French Immersion programs.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE227H5 • Teaching and Learning a Second/Foreign Language

This course provides an introduction to second language pedagogy with a particular focus on French. Students will learn key concepts in pedagogy and compare the teaching and learning processes and experiences of first and second language learners as well as the roles of classroom teachers and learners via the creation of linguistic portraits and pedagogical materials.

Prerequisites: FRE181H5
Exclusions: FRE225Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE240H5 • Interpreting French Narratives

This course provides an introduction to French & Francophone literary and cultural studies, providing students with a set of interpretive tools that they can use to analyze narrative texts and movies in French classes and beyond. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing attentive and critical reading skills about and through narrative texts and movies, and on deploying these skills accurately in written and oral productions and discussions.

Prerequisites: FRE181H5
Exclusions: FRE240Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE272H5 • A Linguistic Introduction to the French Language

This course provides a linguistic introduction to the French language and French-language phenomena. Students will learn to analyze meaning, word, sound, and sentence structure; describe linguistic phenomena including first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, and creoles; and identify the linguistic variation observed among French speakers and speech communities.

Prerequisites: FRE181H5
Exclusions: FRE272Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE280Y5 • Language Practice: Written

This course develops writing skills at an intermediate level in the areas of vocabulary, grammar and style. Emphasis will be put on practice and error correction. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.

Prerequisites: FRE181H5 or equivalent as determined by the department's French Placement Test. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.
Exclusions: FSL321Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 48L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE282H5 • Intermediate Language Practice: Written French

This course develops writing skills at an intermediate level in the areas of vocabulary, grammar, and style. Students will acquire practical tools for understanding and producing French written texts for their university studies and beyond. Emphasis will be placed on developing descriptive, narrative, and argumentative writing skills. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.

Prerequisites: FRE181H5 or FSL305Y5 or equivalent as determined by the department's French Placement Test. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.
Exclusions: FRE280Y5 or FSL321Y1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE283H5 • Intermediate Language Practice: Spoken French

This course provides students with intensive practice in listening and spoken French at the intermediate level. Students will acquire the skills and vocabulary necessary for daily conversations and understanding of Francophone culture through exposure to various media and authentic documents such as songs, storytelling, videos, games, and interviews and other media. Particular attention is paid to spontaneous speech, formal and informal interactions, as well as presentation skills. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.

Prerequisites: FRE181H5 or FSL305Y5 or or the equivalent as determined by the department's French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/).
Exclusions: Not open to native or near native speakers of French.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE299Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall/winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.


Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE312H5 • Modernity, Tradition, and Resistance in Quebec Literature

This course explores the tension between modernity and tradition in a range of fiction and non-fiction written in Quebec from the 19th century to the present day. Students will apply previous knowledge in literature, and their oral and written competences in French to the study of multiple literary genres including the novel, short story, essay and journalistic texts. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive reading skills as ways of reflecting on texts and their relationship to gender, freedom, identity, space and history.


Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5
Exclusions: FRE310Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE316H5 • Comedy and Tragedy in Quebec Theatre

This course explores topics in Quebec theatre, from the 19th century to the present day. Students will apply previous knowledge in literature, and their oral and written competences in French to the study of a variety of plays. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive reading skills as ways of reflecting on dramatic texts and their relationship to space, language, and society.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE325H5 • Talking like a child: language acquisition of French

We might not remember how we learned our first language(s) but we know it/them so well… Or do we? We take the child’s perspective in language learning, focusing on the following topics: the acquisition of grammar, the development of communicative skills, the development of a language in a multilingual environment (as a majority language versus a heritage language), the differences and similarities between simultaneous and successive language acquisition.

Prerequisites: ((FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE342H5 • History of Quebec and French Canada

This course examines the history of French Canada, focusing in particular on the period from the 1830s to the present. It explores questions of culture, political community, language, and geography, looking to these aspects of historical experience to situate Quebec and French Canada with respect to North America's English-speaking majority as well as to the French-speaking nations of Europe, Africa, and elsewhere in the Americas. The course is taught in English but students will work with French-language material and will be required to write all tests and assignments in French. This course is taught in conjunction with HIS342H5.

Prerequisites: FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5
Exclusions: HIS342H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE343H5 • Indigenous Literatures in Quebec and Francophone Canada

The course explores Indigenous literatures in Francophone Canada including Indigenous texts and authors from Quebec. The works discussed engage with issues of sovereignty, anti-racism, Native identity and gender, and span multiple genres including fiction, theatre, poetry and essay.

Prerequisites: [FRE240Y5 or (FRE240H5 and FRE241H5)] and (FRE280Y5 or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE352H5 • Teaching French Grammar

This course examines practical and theoretical issues surrounding grammar in the language curriculum such as various approaches to the implementation of grammar in language curricula, such as in grammar-translation or task-based learning; the role and limitations of descriptive grammar, including pedagogical grammar; form focus versus meaning focus; interference and error analysis; feedback on errors. Students will be asked to critique and create teaching materials.

Prerequisites: (FRE227H5 and (FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and [FRE280Y or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE354H5 • Teaching French in a Plurilingual Context

This course allows students to explore innovative pedagogical approaches such as the Action Oriented and Plurilingual & Pluricultural Approaches, building on knowledge and skills acquired in FRE227H5 Teaching and Learning a Second/Foreign Language. This is accomplished through the examination of the linguistic and cultural diversity observed in French Language classes today, and the discovery of innovative and current teaching approaches followed by the creation of pedagogical materials. Particular emphasis is placed on students’ abilities to transfer knowledge into practice.

Prerequisites: FRE227H5 or FRE272Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE355H5 • Psycholinguistics: multilingual learners in action

This course provides an introduction to real-time language interaction in multilingual comprehension and production. A primary focus will be on language development, spoken and written language processing, the organisation of multilingual memory, and the main experimental methods in psycholinguistics.

Prerequisites: ((FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE356H5 • Versailles and the Classical Age

This course explores topics in 17th century French culture and Versailles as the expression of the major cultural achievements of this period. Students will apply their oral and written competences in French to the study of a variety of texts, art forms, and media. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive interpretive skills as ways to reflect on the development of 17th century classical taste and its relationship to its political, social, and artistic context.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE363H5 • Love and Pain in French Literature

This course explores the tension between love and pain in a range of French literary works from 1800 to the contemporary era. Students will apply their previous knowledge in literature, and oral and written competences in French, to the study of multiple autobiographical and literary genres. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive reading skills as ways of reflecting on first- and third-person writing and its relationship to love, social context and expectations, and gender.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE364H5 • Society through the French Novel

This course explores the representation of social issues in French literature, from the 19th century to the contemporary era. Students will apply previous knowledge in literature, and their oral and written competences in French to the study of social exclusion and marginality, class consciousness, and social identities as literary themes. Particular emphasis will be on extending attentive reading skills as ways of thinking about storytelling and its relationship to character, the interplay between documentary and fictional genres, and commitment through authorship.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5
Exclusions: FRE364Y5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE367H5 • French Fiction of the 20th Century

This course allows students to explore French fiction of the 20th Century. Students apply previous knowledge in literature and cultural studies, and their oral and written competences in French to the study of works. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive reading skills as ways of reflecting on memory and the telling of war experiences, the lives of women, and crime and guilt in the French context.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5
Exclusions: FRE467H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE369H5 • The French Novel Today

This course explores contemporary French literature. Students will apply previous knowledge in literature, and their oral and written competences in French to the study of key trends in contemporary fiction and autobiography. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive reading skills as ways of reflecting on storytelling and its relationship to critical social commentary, the creative power of language, and testimony.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE370H5 • Voices from No-Man's Land: Diaspora Writings in the 21st Century Francophone Literature

Contemporary literature written in the French language offers a rich and fertile ground for writers of various origins, cultures and languages who are united by several common factors: exile, immigration, transculturation, identity and alterity, and relationship with French, among others. This course explores these topics while relating them to literary and cultural contexts as well as students' real life through extensive reading and analysis of ultra contemporary novels and short stories by authors such as Dany Laferrière, Ying Chen, Aki Shimazaki, Kim Thúy, Marco Micone, Abla Farhoud, Sergio Kokis, Agota Kristof, Dai Sijie, or Nancy Huston.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE376H5 • French Phonology and Phonetics

A study of the phonological system of modern French based on actual samples of speech taken from different regional varieties and socio-economic groups.

Prerequisites: ((FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5
Exclusions: FRE376H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE377H5 • Phonetics & Phonology of French Foreign Accent

This course explores the phonetic and phonological properties of second language French learners' speech. Particular emphasis is placed on students' ability to summarize typical characteristics and phenomena of second language speech learning, identify segmental and prosodic features of non-native French including inter-learner variability, and conduct acoustic analyses of real learner speech.

Prerequisites: ((FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE378H5 • French syntax and the multilingual speaker

This course explores the sentential structure of French through the lens of language learners. The focus is first and foremost on the learning of French grammar including relative clauses, negation, pronominals and the agreement system.

Prerequisites: ((FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5
Exclusions: FRE378H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE380H5 • Plurilingual Theatre : Developing Writing and Oral Skills in French

The use of drama or theatre-based activities is a proven way to motivate and support learners in a foreign language classroom. Through observation, active participation, and reflection on the processes involved when learning French language and culture, students will use their knowledge of French, and other languages, to enhance communicative skills through drama (ranging from improvisation to full-length plays).

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE382H5 • Advanced Language Practice: Written French

This course develops writing skills at an advanced level in the areas of vocabulary, grammar and style. Emphasis will be put on practice and error correction. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.

Prerequisites: FRE282H5 or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5 or the equivalent as determined by the department's French Language Placement Test.
Exclusions: Not normally open to francophones and/or holders of the French baccalaureat but contingent on the results of the French Language Placement Test.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE383H5 • Advanced Language Practice: Spoken French

This course provides students with intensive practice in listening and spoken French at the advanced level. Students will acquire competences and vocabulary necessary for authentic academic and professional settings. Formal and informal interactions, projects and tasks are designed to enhance various types of oral communication skills. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.

Prerequisites: FRE283H5 or FSL406H5.
Exclusions: Not open to native speakers of French and holders of the French baccalaureat.

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12P
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE385H5 • Decoding French Language Games

This course explores the phonological properties of French language games such as Verlan and Loucherbem. Adopting a comparative approach with standard French, particular emphasis will be placed on students' ability to identify and model phonological patterns of segmental and syllable structure modification using both descriptive and theoretical phonological tools.

Prerequisites: (FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5]

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE386H5 • French Semantics

Various approaches to the notion of meaning; its functioning at all levels of representation.

Prerequisites: [(FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)] or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5 or equivalent.
Exclusions: FRE386H1

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE387H5 • French Morphology

A study of the morphological system of modern French, its relationship to syntax and phonology; theoretical notions derived from the analysis of specific data. Special attention will be given to the methods of analysis and classification, as well as selected morphological categories (verbs, nouns, etc.).

Prerequisites: [(FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)] or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5 or equivalent.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE389H5 • Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition

This course examines the effects of cognitive (e.g., aptitude, working memory) and affective differences (e.g., motivation, L2 anxiety) on second language acquisition. Students will come to understand the nature of these differences via empirical studies on learners of French and the use of assessment instruments including questionnaires and on-line tests. Particular emphasis is placed on students' ability to discuss between-learner differences in comprehension and production, identify relevant individual differences capable of explaining such variability, and conduct their own individual differences research.

Prerequisites: ((FRE225Y or FRE227H or FRE272H5 or FRE272Y5) and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE391H5 • Women and LGBTQ+ Writers and Filmmakers of the Francophone World

This course invites students to explore women and LGBTQ+ writers and filmmakers from France and the Francophone world. Students will apply their previous knowledge in literature and cultural studies, and their oral and written competences in French to the study of works by French, Quebecois, Caribbean and African authors and directors. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive reading skills as ways of thinking about gender representation, feminism, and identity in fiction, non-fiction, and films.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE393H5 • French Society through Film

This course explores the representation of social issues in French cinema, from the Sixties to the contemporary era. Students will develop knowledge in cultural studies, and their oral and written competences in French, through the study of social exclusion and marginality, class conflict, and social identities as cinematographic themes. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive interpretive skills as ways of reflecting on storytelling and its relationship to the cinematic medium, the interplay between documentary and fictional genres, and authorship.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE395H5 • Francophone Media and Global Culture

This course explores media and culture in the Francophone world through textual, graphic, musical and cinematographic content. Students will apply previously acquired knowledge in cultural studies, and their oral and written competences in French to the study of multiple cultural and mediatic forms including movies, graphic novels and songs. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive reading skills as ways of thinking about texts, images and music, and on deploying these skills to better understand the relationship between different Francophone cultures within our contemporary world.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE397H5 • Francophone African and Caribbean Cinema

This course provides an introduction to Francophone African and Caribbean cinema studies, tracing its origins and emergence to the present day. Students will apply previous knowledge in cultural studies, and their oral and written competences in French to the study of works by North-African, Sub-Saharan African, and Caribbean male and female directors. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive reading skills as ways of thinking about colonialism, gender, space, and identity in narrative movies and documentaries.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE398H5 • The Culture of Paris

This course explores the city of Paris as it developed into a cultural beacon of excellence in French culture throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will expand and apply previous knowledge in cultural studies, and their oral and written competences in French, to the study of the events that have shaped the Paris of today. Particular emphasis will be placed on extending attentive interpretive skills to the impact of historical events, city planning and promotion, and artistic celebration, and on deploying these skills to think critically about heritage in the French context. As part of this course, students have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process.

Prerequisites: (FRE240H5 and [FRE280Y5 or (FRE282H5 and FRE283H5)]) or a minimum grade of 77% in FSL406H5

International Component: International - Optional
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE399Y5 • Research Opportunity Program

This course provides senior undergraduate students who have developed some knowledge of research methods used in the discipline of French studies to work in the research project of a U of T Mississauga professor for course credit. Enrolled students have the opportunity to become involved in original research, develop their research skills, and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Project descriptions for participating faculty members for the following summer and fall/winter sessions are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.

Prerequisites: FRE227H5 and (FRE240H5 or FRE272H5)

Course Experience: University-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE400H5 • French Studies Internship

Students enrolled in a French Studies program of study will have the opportunity, through work placement, to apply the knowledge and expertise gained throughout their studies in French. The work placement will take place in corporations, local media or community organizations. Application deadline is February 28th. Students will be required to include a letter of interest highlighting their qualifications as suitable candidates for an internship opportunity. Applicants who meet minimum criteria (must be in 4th year of studies, number of courses completed in FRE and CGPA) will be selected for an interview. Final decisions will be based on a combination of academic qualifications, experience, and the interview.

Prerequisites: FRE382H5 and FRE383H5 and an additional 1.0 credit at the 300 level in FRE

Course Experience: Partnership-Based Experience
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE440H5 • Francophone Periodical Studies

This advanced research course provides students a theoretical and practical background in periodical studies, exploring the interaction of literature and journalism from the beginning of the 19th century to the present day in France and Quebec. Students work under the supervision of the instructor to prepare, collect, and analyze data from periodicals, newspapers and magazines, and to present findings in the form of a research report.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit from among 300-level French and Francophone Literary & Cultural studies courses category.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE442H5 • Advanced Language Practice IV: Written

Consolidation of writing skills in the areas of vocabulary, grammar and style. This writing intensive course focuses on improving persuasiveness in writing, in part by reading and analyzing a variety of texts to learn to recognize strategies that work in written communications. All students are REQUIRED to complete the French Placement Test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/) before enrolling in ANY FSL or FRE language course for the FIRST time.

Prerequisites: FRE382H5 or permission of the instructor. Also open to francophones and/or holders of the French or international baccalauéat but contingent on the results of the Online French language placement test (https://frenchpt.utm.utoronto.ca/).

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/24T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE445H5 • Special Topics in French & Francophone Literary and Cultural Studies I

A study of fiction, non-fiction or theoretical approaches in French and Francophone literature and culture.

Prerequisites: (0.5 credit at the 300-level from the French & Francophone Literary and Cultural Studies category) and (0.5 credit of FRE at the 300-level, determined annually contingent on course content)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE446H5 • Special Topics in Literature II

A study of fiction, non-fiction or theoretical approaches in French & Francophone literature and culture.

Prerequisites: (0.5 credit from the 300-level French and Francophone Literary & Cultural Studies category) and (0.5 credit of FRE at the 300-level, determined annually contingent on course content)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE453H5 • Teaching French Culture

This advanced research course deepens students’ theoretical and practical background in language pedagogy, exploring research questions related to issues surrounding the integration of culture in the language curriculum including the relationship between authentic language and culture, and the role of linguistic and cultural diversity in education. Students will learn to critique and create teaching materials and undertake an independent research project.

Prerequisites: FRE354H5 and 0.5 credit at the 300-level from among the FRE Language Teaching and Learning courses.
Exclusions: FRE353H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE482H5 • Creative Writing

This course allows students to develop their French writing skills with a variety of short imaginative and first-person genres. Students will extend their knowledge of language creativity and written competences in French to the production of a range of creative texts based on examples and using generative techniques. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing precision and a diversity of expressive skills, especially varied vocabulary and standard idiomatic turns. 

Prerequisites: FRE382H5
Exclusions: FSL482H5

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 12L/12T
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE487H5 • Advanced Topics in Experimental French Linguistics

An advanced study (or in-depth examination) of a specific topic in experimental French linguistics. Content in any given year depends on the instructor. Contact the department for details.

Prerequisites: 0.5 credit from the French Linguistics category plus 0.5 FRE 300-level credit determined annually contingent on course content.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE488H5 • Advanced Topics in Theoretical French Linguistics

An advanced study (or in-depth examination) of a specific topic in theoretical French linguistics. Content in any given year depends on the instructor. Contact the department for details.

Prerequisites: 0.5 credit from the French Linguistics category plus 0.5 FRE 300-level credit determined annually contingent on course content.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24S
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE489H5 • The Structure of the Syllable in Romance Languages

A comparative approach to the study of various phonological processes of contemporary Romance languages. Current issues on the representation of syllable structure and problems of syllabification in reference to phenomena such as liaison, elision, definite and indefinite article selection et cetera.

Prerequisites: FRE376H5 and FRE377H5 and (FRE385H5 or LIN229H5) and any 0.5 credit of FRE Linguistics or LIN at the 300-level

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Total Instructional Hours: 24L
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE490Y5 • Senior Essay

An independent research paper on either a literary or linguistic topic to be proposed by the student and supervised by an instructor, culminating in a major research paper. For Specialists who wish to fulfill the requirements for their fourth year Literature courses. A maximum of 1.0 credit can be taken in both Senior Essay (FRE490Y5) and Independent Study (FRE491H5, FRE492H5)

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit of FRE at the 300-level relevant to the topic of study

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE491H5 • Independent Study

A scholarly project supervised by a Faculty member on a literary or linguistic topic of common interest, including readings, discussions and papers.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit of FRE at the 300-level relevant to the topic of study

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class

FRE492H5 • Independent Study

A scholarly project supervised by a Faculty member on a literary or linguistic topic of common interest, including readings, discussions and papers.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit of FRE at the 300-level relevant to the topic of study

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Mode of Delivery: In Class